School vs Work, or something...

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I former co-worker of mine did a good job putting his finger on something that I've felt for a long time:

 

I’m watching my way through [an online iOS programming class.]

 

Unfortunately the nature of the beast is that the further you get from programmers who not only write code but have to support it long term, the more naive the code gets.

They set little traps that are going to bite them in the ass six months from now.

On the plus side it does have the same anticipatory thrill as watching a horror movie: ”No foolish non-main character! Don’t go down the darkened stairs into the basement! Bob never came up from there!"

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I believe the ancient Romans made their bridge builders cross the newly-completed bridge first.  And I've heard that the directors of some European explosives factories were required to live on the premises.  Both good exercises in focusing the mind.

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This seems to somewhat apply to PCB layout too...do a rush job & let the next guy clean up the mess.   Partly driven by the "we need to ship it!" mentality.

You have the proto almost complete.  Never been powered up, not all code has been created.  No product testing or eval has even been done at all.  Once the proto barely starts to sputter to life, it seems all these things often get swept away by a tsunami of "lets get ready to ship in 2 weeks!".  The next 6 months are going to be the longest 2 weeks of your life. 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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it is said you can't teach experience! Most of us have been in the situation where the project is not working at the 11th hour. Having an unhappy boss, customer etc is a feeling we all want to avoid. I'm training a young engineer at the moment and I'm trying to pass on what not to do. Even this week, he rushed out to the local electronics shop to buy some enclosures. Then he's back at the office figuring out how to plug a hole with a grommet. Being the grumpy old man, I said "you didn't think too hard about this up front?". I then suggested he go back and buy some more expensive enclosures and some compression glands. He did this and assembled the items. After he was done, I said "that was much easier and the result looks much better". I keep on pitchin' it, but he's not hittin' it!

 

 

Some of my sayings: - 

1. Check the obvious

2. It takes three steps to a f*#kup

3. Don't be too hasty to make a mistake

4. Once you add a fudge, you'll need a fudge to fix that, and a fudge to fix that. Ad infinitum. Do it right in the first instance.

 

And friend of mine has the mantra: "The long way is the short way!"

 

If only I followed what I preach!

 

Be it code, system design, building a house etc - there's a process to follow. Break that process and be prepared for the outcome.

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First three lines of my .sig.

 

And the last line ;-)

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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As an old programmer, I find myself in the "test department" for a larger than it should be project. The code is written by younger programmers. I use C# and "selenium" to exercise the program and see if it works. I write some complex C# code because I want to be sure to run the same tests on upcoming "sprints."

 

I find strange things like, "If you include a space in the name, it enters the name with 2 spaces." or "This fails if you put a capital letter in the string."

 

The young programmers wonder, "How could you possibly have found this?"

 

I sometimes wonder, "How could you possibly have coded this?"

 

They like that instead of saying, "this doesn't work," that I do some digging to find what doesn't work about it. But then I have to turn it back to them as I'm not allowed to see the source. "No, no. You don't have to fix it, just find it."

 

It's being kindof fun and I really appreciate income being above expenses. Something that hasn't happened in a few years.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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How about punctuation marks in the names... but allow for O'Brien... cheeky

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Thank you for what you do (testing roosts)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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but allow for O'Brien... cheeky

self-destruct command detected, sequence initiated!!

 

 

Menu systems often have hidden flaws that are fun to find, especially when illegal combos are not detected.

Order your hamburger with extra pepperoni!!   Change your selection from steak to ice cream & it arrives well-done.

 

 

  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!