Power distribution box with relays instead of trip switches

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#1
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Hi

 

I had created a post about a week ago, about relay and enclosures.

 

But i would like to know is there a commercially ready power distribution box, that can have relays(latching) plugged in so that i can control the power to a certain device?

 

I would like to avoid creating a new PCB , with may be 10 relays etc , if such type of boxes are available.

 

I thinking of something similar to trip switch box, but with relays switches instead.

 

All i need to do then is connect my 2 control wires to the desired relay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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what about something like this...there are plenty of relay board available (some in boxes, or use your own)

 

https://alexnld.com/product/bestep-8-channel-3-3v-relay-module-optocoupler-driver-relay-control-board-low-level-for-arduino/

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Are you looking to control Mains Voltage, or low voltage?

 

For example:

https://www.altronix.com/product...

 

 

I use these a lot in the access control work I do

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

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Din Rail mounting is commonly used for power switching, with the rail mounted in an electrical panel box.

 

Jim

 

 

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HI

 

I have seen that before, but i need latching relays.

 

I would prefer there to be one power input and then let is be distributed among the relays.

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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jgmdesign wrote:

Are you looking to control Mains Voltage, or low voltage?

 

For example:

https://www.altronix.com/product...

 

 

I use these a lot in the access control work I do

 

JIm

 

It has to mains 250v, 

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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ki0bk wrote:

 

Din Rail mounting is commonly used for power switching, with the rail mounted in an electrical panel box.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Great, can any relay get plugged into such mounts?

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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djoshi wrote:
Great, can any relay get plugged into such mounts?

Yes, pick your relay and the base that match!   Check the catalogs of industrial supply houses, Granger, Automation Direct, etc.

 

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274
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Great, i will check with my local electrical supplier, which is RS electronics.

 

 

 

 

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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Your run of the mill 'fuse' boards can have latching relays fitted instead of MCBs.

 

 

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Great, i think this will be good. This way i can expand as we need more power slots.

 

Thanks

 

 

 

Thanks

Regards

DJ

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Is the term ‘trip switches’ common in the UK?
Over here, RS components is the place to go to if you want it quickly, but you pay for the privilege. Local automation and electrical supply houses are usually significantly cheaper.

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Kartman wrote:

Is the term ‘trip switches’ common in the UK?

 

Yes, it's probably the colloquial term that most non-technical people use.

 

The technical terms over here are...

MCB = Miniature Circuit Breaker. Trips on excess load current only, and the similar looking...

RCBO = Residual Current, Breaker Overload. Trips on either excess load current OR excess line/neutral current imbalance

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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djoshi wrote:

Great, i think this will be good. This way i can expand as we need more power slots.

 

Have a look at stuff made by Schneider Electric.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Sometimes Facebook provides something worthwhile....

 

While I was being 'social' This add popped up in my feed:

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072M4...

 

I might have to order a few of these to see if I can use them in place of some of the Crestron stuff I use currently.

 

THought it might be of use to you.

 

Right Side Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Devices with a bunch of relays and an Ethernet connection have been sold as commercial products for years.

They are used to remotely power cycle computers.

 

In the PLC world there is also all kind of stuff with the name "remote I/O".

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com