A new scope

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#1
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Hi Guys,

I am seriously considering replacing my existing DSO with a Tek 2024B DPO, 4 channel, 200MHz. Anybody have experience with one? Comments positive or negative?

Jim Lake

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I've got a 2022B and I think it's great. However, the 2000 series is a DSO, not a DPO.

Cheers,

Tom

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Hello Jim,
i got a TDS2024B last october and i think that it is a great scope. I use the TDS2024A at work and the new model has some nice improvements( USB port, better menues and better probes).
It is really great for microcontroler work to have four channels
even though this is not a scope specific feature. Another nice thing is the small amount of desk space the TDS2024 occupies. What might be a drawback is the small memory (2.5k) compared with other scopes.

Florian

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I too use the 2024b at work and I've been searching one for myself but can't find a price below 2200. . .it's definitely a handy scope

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The price I got(from Valuetronics) was 2290, new in the box. I do not know what the year of manufacture is. Anyone know?
I could get a 4 channel 3000 series scope, new, for 4300, but that is out of the budget, and I am not sure it would bring anything significant additional over the 2024B. Has anyone done business with these guys? Are they on the up and up?

Jim Lake

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The 3000 series and 4 channels has some improvement over a 2-channel 2000 series scope. Typically, 2 channels are enough except for logic analyzer purposes. Most of the time, I use only one channel on my digital scope, sometimes two. I have an older Tektronix 400MHz analog 4-channel scope that I haven't used for a few years since I bought the digital scope and a logic analyzer.

One option you might want to consider is purchasing a 2-channel scope and as well as a low-cost PC-based logic analyzer. At least, that's the route I took and I've been pleased (Scopemeter 199C and Lantronix LogicPort). The logic analyzer, besides have dozens of channels, also has protocol decoding so you can see the RS-232, I2C, or SPI byte values of signals.

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I bought that scope for home/work use about 6 months ago. Great bit of kit. Im really glad I got a 4 channel scope as its VERY useful. The size is compact, user interface is fantastic, functions and feature set great, and extra PC and memory stick interfacing is excellant (software arrives with it for screen captures and realtime PC operation).

The only things Ive noticed so far is: the screen contrast is effected by temperature (TBH I was a little dissapointed by the screen quality - a little bit too much cost saving IMO for the money paid out). The second thing is the onboard processor slows a little if your controlling it by PC (well - more likely to be the USB interface...etc).

Overall a great scope and Im glad i bought it over the alternatives.

BTW: MATLAB also has a interface program for the 2024...

BTW: you guys arnt talking about GBP? I bought mine for £1600 (ouch :oops:) after searching everywhere for a cheaper alternative.

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No, no GBIB on the scope I am looking at. It comes with four probes and some software for communication with the PC as standard accessories.

I am curious about the DPO, however. Initially, I thought that this was a DPO (Digital Phosphor), it is not. It is a DSO. Having never used one, I am a bit curious about the DPO. As I understand it, DPO allows the screen intensity to vary with the signal intensity. Is that right? Sort of giving you a third dimension on the signal? Is it worth while?

Thanks for the feedback.

Jim Lake

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Quote:
I am curious about the DPO, however. Initially, I thought that this was a DPO (Digital Phosphor), it is not. It is a DSO. Having never used one, I am a bit curious about the DPO. As I understand it, DPO allows the screen intensity to vary with the signal intensity. Is that right? Sort of giving you a third dimension on the signal? Is it worth while?

IMHO it depends on your point of reference....having used analog scope for many many years before acquiring a digital scope I found the 3000 series more comforting...but depending on the app I think the newer 2000B series would get the job done for most people at a more affordable price point...have you looked on Teks Refurb link...Factory refurbs can save you a few bucks if you need to and the source is reliable..the other good advice Kevin R provided you was the inexpensive logic analyser..the combination of this and the 2000B series would still be less than a 3000B series and it would provide you with the ability to track down most any errant electron!!
I am currently drooling over a Tek MSO4000 series but not sure I could part with that many sheep so I could afford it...

I am curious how Kevin likes his Scopemeter 199C..I just bought a Tek THS7xx so I could do isolated line voltage tests without frying my ass so easily......

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Bluegoo, I like the Scopemeter 199C quite fine. Isolation and portability are the main reasons I choose the 199C (and probably the reason you bought the THS7xx). I ended up choosing the 199C over a Tek 3000B series scope with isolation and portability beating the extra features and user-interface of a 3000B. I also considered a THS7xx, but the color screen of the 199C appealed to me. As a mild bonus, the 199C also has a third set of isolated leads with multimeter functionality.

My decision was somewhat biased because I had just fried my PicoScope USB 100MHz scope and nearly fried my laptop due to incorrect ground placement of the leads. Thus, the fully isolated 199C (along with its optoisolated USB cable) was quite appealing.

I'm further biased because I already have an older, heavy, analog Tek 400MHz 4-channel scope for bench use. So, purchasing a hand-held, isolated scope (along with the LogicPort) was a useful addition for my needs.

Obviously, portable digital scopes don't have the intuitive, rapid access of dials and switches that bench scopes have. But, I'm finding the 199C to be a nice complement for my needs.

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Quote:
I also considered a THS7xx, but the color screen of the 199C appealed to me.

yes I considered the Scopemeter 199C ..that color is nice like I have on my Tek 3xxxB....and yes the isolation was the big "I WANT IT".. but I ran across a deal that was the decision maker $ and saved me a lot of beers...the Tek THS7XX has a feature so that everytime it is powered up it increments a count in the flash memory..so you know how many times it has been used so to speak...since they run about $3000 new like the Scopemeter 199C I went looking for a seldom used one...I found one that like many expensive items someone buys and never really uses..I got one in mint condition and new battery for a total of $730..it had been powered up only 47 times! Now I can check out those line voltage transients and power controls without frying my ass..well almost..a little ass frying at my age every now and then keeps me sort of perky!!! :)

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Bluegoo, That's a heck of a deal on the THS7xx. Is that for the 100Mhz or 200MHz model? In either case, it's quite a good deal. I'd be tempted by that as well as compared to the large price I paid for the 199C.

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Quote:
That's a heck of a deal on the THS7xx. Is that for the 100Mhz or 200MHz model?

THS720A ...100mhz plenty fast for my needs chasing electrons on the line voltage...own faster scopes and logic analyzers for chasing electrons on drugs!

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bluegoo, makes sense!