Switch Ac wave to mosfet

Go To Last Post
48 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Hello Guys 

 

I am New to work onto the mosfet.

 

Please guide me or suggest me the How Can I switch the Ac wave to mosfet at different- different levels.

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 10, 2018 - 06:30 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

seggi wrote:
I am New to work onto the mosfet.

So what basic study/research have you done to understand the operation and usage of MOSFETs?

 

Do you already have an understanding of electronics in general?

 

seggi wrote:
switch the Ac wave to mosfet at different- different levels

I'm sorry, I have no idea what you mean by that.

 

Perhaps you could provide a diagram (or diagrams) to illustrate what you wish to achieve?

See Tip #1 for how to post images.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Seggi---

 

You need to be much more clear on your question, please take your time.

 

Generally you DO NOT USE MOSFET FOR AC switching  (without having much complexity) , A TRIAC IS really preferred.   Or in simple cases you may have a much easier time using a relay.  In some high-power cases, look at IGBT.

 

If you are making an amplifier...then a pair of mosfets may be used to generate the "AC" output.

 

How much power to you need to handle  1watt?  10 watts?  1000Watts?  5Volts?  500Volts?  Please give details on what you are needing.

 

 

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

avrcandies wrote:
Please give details on what you are needing

Indeed. Describe the goal - not (just) the step: http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/sma...

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Fri. Aug 10, 2018 - 09:31 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Are you looking for a simple mosfet amplifier circuit like this:

Image result for mosfet amplifier circuit diagram

 

Jim

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early!

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274

 

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

If you need more power (current) out, then you want a push-pull stage...this is NOT for simple on/off control (DC output is blocked)

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Is this just a guessing game - post every possible MOSFET application until someone hits what the OP is actually after ?!

 

That could take a while ...

 

frown

 

perhaps (s)he's trying to make an analogue switch:

http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/es154/lectures/lecture_4/mosfet/mos_circuits/cmos_gate/maxim/maxim.html

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

If you're new to mosfets, you should start with spending some time studying them.

Wikipedia is a good place for the theory of MOSfets, lots of example's and tutorials on the 'net.

 

MOSfet's always have a parasitic diode in them.

In old designs this was more of a nuisance than usefull, but in more modern designs the properties of those diodes are enhanced (switching speed, current handling capability) to be usefull as freewheel diodes.

If you want to switch AC with a MOSfet, then this diode gets in the way though.

The easiest way around it is to use 2 MOSfets and tie the Sources (or was it drains, I always mix up those 2 without seeing the schematic) together. Put them in "anti" series, so one of the diodes always blocks the AC.

Then you can tie the gates together, and treat the combo  as a single MOSfet.

Gossen uses this in some of their multimeters, where it is used to select different shunt resistors for current measurement.

 

There are also devices called "photomos", which are optocouplers with 2 anti-series mosfets instead of a bipolar transistor on the output, and these can also switch AC but current is usually limited to 100mA or so.

These devices are often used in the triggered output on oscilloscopes (usually on the back side of an oscilloscope. This is not the external trigger input on the front.).

 

 

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

MOSfet's always have a parasitic diode in them.

FYI--there are actually some that don't, but they are extremely rare.  They require specialized processing steps to prevent the intrinsic parasitic diode from appearing.  Of course I put the datasheet aside in case I ever needed it, somewhere!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello guys,

 

Sorry for late reply.

 

now i am explaining in a details..

 

Actually i am trying to do is

My input side is Ac Wave or mains This will goes to the tapped transformer. 

and Transformer Secondary side the Is tapped i.e now i am trying to do is Tapped transformer is many tapped or some levels are there to take the output of sine wave but for tapping of this output level is controlled by switch and for this switch i am placing the mosfet to switching or handling the output  of ac wave .

 

i hope so you guys are much more clear on my Question now..

 

So guys now tell me the how can i do this ?

 

Thank you so much guys to looking your interest in this and answering me the suggestion.

 

Best Regards,

Seggi.  

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks for giving me such a helpfull advice..

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

seggi wrote:
i hope so you guys are much more clear on my Question now.

Note really.

 

It is never great trying to describe circuit details in words - especially in a foreign language.

 

This is exactly why we have circuit diagrams - aka, "schematics" - it is a far clearer and more effective way to describe stuff like this.

 

So, as requested in #2,  please provide a diagram (or diagrams) to illustrate what you wish to achieve.

See Tip #1 for how to post images.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

seggi wrote:

This is the example circuit of controlling the ac wave but it doesnt controlled anything yet.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That does not correspond to what you wrote in #10 - where is the transformer?

 

please crop the picture!

 

EDIT

 

You say you are unfamiliar with MOSFETs. 

 

Therefore, rather than try to draw a schematic with MOSFETs, just put a box where you want the "switch" to go.

Or just draw a switch!

 

Then people can advise you

  1. Whether a MOSFET is appropriate for such an application;
  2. If it is, how to do it;
  3. If it isn't, what the alternatives are.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Mon. Aug 13, 2018 - 10:40 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Actually Transformer is also giving me the sine wave output thats the reason is this i am not putting the transformer now in a simulation in place of putting ac power source.

This was also giving me the sine wave.

and i was studied  the operation of mosfet for mosfet giving the gate voltage mosfet is on and giving output.

That's the reason is this for making the circuit .

 

my goal for this circuit is whenever i am not giving the gate voltage or i am not turning on the mosfet i will not take the sine wave but whenever i am giving the gate voltage or mosfet turn on then i will the sine wave output.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ST har et bra schema for this but fungerer ikke if you want 100% power out.. 

 

Attachment(s): 

Thierry Pottier

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

So why do you specifically want to use (a) MOSFET(s) ?

 

As noted in #3, a TRIAC would be a more obvious / usual choice.

 

Or even a relay - maybe a solid-state relay.

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

So are you trying to switch the input to the primary (A), or the output(s) from one or more of the secondaries (1,2,3), or both, or what?

 

See how much clearer & easier that is to explain with a diagram?

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Please don't tell us you are trying to build one of these:

 

Tap Changer

 

My last encounter with these (in solid state form with Gould controller) was back in the mid 80's and to say they were reliable would be a complete lie. So - so offten would the test room at Marconi Instruments be filled with smoke; someone shouting "Oh Shit"; and the smell of roasted torridal transformer filling our lungs. Oh they were the days.

 

Last Edited: Tue. Aug 14, 2018 - 09:24 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Again, are you talking 1Watt, 10W, 10000W?...looks like you are using regular 110Vac line.

 

I'd seriously consider using a relay on each tap & be done with it.  You won't change the tap very often, probably rarely.

 

Why do you need all of these taps in the first place?

 

 

and the smell of roasted torridal transformer

Ah, chef Gauss used to work at your place too!

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

Last Edited: Mon. Aug 13, 2018 - 03:44 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

avrcandies wrote:
You won't change the tap very often, probably rarely.

We don't know that - seggi's description remains far too vague!

 

frown

 

Why do you need all of these taps in the first place?

A very good question!

 

@seggi  - you still haven't told us what you are actually trying to achieve!

 

You are too focussed on the step (using a MOSFET) you need to describe the goal (what your system will actually do) - see: http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/sma...

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Your schematic is drawn incorrect.

The negative pole of your  battery should be connected to both sources of your MOSfet's.

The Gate voltage of a MOSfet should always be referenced to the voltage on the Source.

Itt is called Ugs for a reason.

 

My PNG skills are not the best, but I think this should be clear:

 

Edit:

The gates of MOSfets are very high impedance voltage controlled devices. You should at least add a resistor between the gates and the sources of the fets to discharge the gate capacitance to turn the FET's off.

But for PWM-ming or high voltage controll a push pull stage would be better.

 

Since you seem to be switching mains voltage:

In light dimmers sometimes a MOSfet is used with a bridge rectifier.

You put AC into the rectifier, and a single MOSfet switches the rectified DC current.

 

Rectifiers are cheaper than (High voltage) MOSfets.

 

Edit 2:

You have also drawn the MOSfets "upside down".

You have connected the drains of the MOSfet's together instead of the Sources.

If this was only a simulation, you can re-use the same MOSfets.

If this is build in real hardware, then Q3 (and maybe also Q2) will have died because Ugs has a very limited maximum (Usually 20V, sometimes higher or even lower).

The gates of MOSfets are pretty fragile, and not able to withstand 120Vac_rms.

 

Edit 3:

Q2 is drawn correct for switching a DC load. Your error is adding Q3 on top of that.

Q3 should have been added mirrored on the "GND" line for the negative part of the sinewave.

 

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Tue. Aug 14, 2018 - 02:34 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello ,Yes i am trying to switch 1,2,3 secondary output.

and these can be switched to the mosfet or igbt Can be Possible.

 

Reason For using of mosfet and igbt is the my switching time is having on the microseconds that's is the reason foe using the mosfet or igbt's that's the reason i am not preferabally using the triac and ralay.

Last Edited: Tue. Aug 14, 2018 - 03:45 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 2

Triacs turn off/on in microseconds. You’ve still not told us basic things like how much current or what you’re wanting to achieve.

Last Edited: Tue. Aug 14, 2018 - 05:39 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

seggi wrote:
Reason For using of mosfet and igbt is the my switching time is having on the microseconds

 

Do you need to switch on or off at any time, or can you do it at AC zero crossing?

 

Is your load inductive or capacitive?

 

What is the load?

 

Why microseconds for switching 60Hz?

 

Beware, mosfet gates are capacitive, fast switching may require several amps to charge or discharge the gate. Mosfet gates are only high impedance when not switched. Fast switching often requires a dedicated driver.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 2

 

@seggi  - you still haven't told us what you are actually trying to achieve!

 

You are too focussed on the step (using a MOSFET) you need to describe the goal (what your system will actually do) - see: http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/sma...

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Upvoted Awneil #27

What are you trying to build?

Is it a light dimmer?

seggi wrote:
Hello ,Yes i am trying to switch 1,2,3 secondary output.

Is it going to be some 3-phase control circuit?

 

If the goal is to experiment with MOSfet's, then start with DC circuits.

 

Also:

Re-read my #23, I added 2 comments on your circuit.

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Tue. Aug 14, 2018 - 03:03 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Seggi, you might wish to consider using solid-state relays (SSRs).  These can be based on MOSFETs, TRiACs, etc.  Many provide optical isolation between the control circuitry and the high-power switching circuitry.  Isolating the MCU from the high-voltage AC is almost always a good thing.  Another feature available in SSRs is zero-voltage switching, which avoids switching during the active portion of the AC half-wave.  To drive an SSR, they typically 'look' like an LED - very simple.

 

Altazi

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 2

I am going to give the OP two more posts to explain this project before I lock the thread as there is NOTHING of value other than post counts increasing going on.

 

Lets have it Seggi.  Post some information of what you are trying to do, and why you need microsecond switching time for a 50hz/60hz AC signal, and why you seem to want to ignore a lot of very good advice.

 

Jim - Moderator

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello,

 my Goal is to be making the Light dimming Project and i want to do it with mosfet switching and mosfet is controlled to the  controller signal and i am also trying to experimenting with igbt's also. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

seggi wrote:

Hello,

 my Goal is to be making the Light dimming Project and i want to do it with mosfet switching and mosfet is controlled to the  controller signal and i am also trying to experimenting with igbt's also. 

 

Then  you sure as heck do not need microsecond switching time for that as common incandescent lamps react too slow to show the switching.  Fluorescent lamps as well.  LED lighting MIGHT show something based on teh power supply driver, but if they do, they are poorly designed.

 

as already said numerous times MOSFETS are not a good idea for this.  You do not need MOSFETS in order to control dimming with a microcontroller.

 

Can you supply some specifications on your lamps you want to dim with this method?  The load is important.  Keep in mind that triac, and other far safer dimming methods are available for doing this.

 

Can you supply a part number for this transformer you intend on using?

 

 

In the 30+ years I have been drawing a paycheck I have only worked ONCE with using a multi tap transformer to dim lights.  It was for Denver International Airport.  The Runway lighting levels were set using a multi tap transformer.  500vac primary, 3.5Kv secondary with 7 taps on it.  the output of the secondary fed the lamps on the sides, and embedded in the runway itself.  The Lamps were 120vac, so there was a step-down transformer on every lamp.  The tap selection was not done with any solid state device back then.  It was a super duty set of break-before-make relays that did the tap selection in a concrete lighting vault.  The switching time was measured in the milliseconds and you never saw the lights go dark during the transition.  There was also a control line to each lamp and a lamp on sense line return.  Both of these lines fed Modicon PLC's which in turn communicated back to the control tower via Fibre Optic Modems that I helped design.

 

Point I am trying to make is that this is not something that is commonplace and for good reasons why.  If this is purely for your own education, so be it, but I can think of far better starter projects than this.  Safer one too wink

 

So, your next assignment is to provide specifications on your lamp(s) and your transformer so everyone has a better idea of what you have, and what you have to work with.  Also what controller are you thinking of using for this device?

 

JIm

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello,

 

I Have one query in a mind.

in a AC Switching Can We control the mosfet or gate to the controller?

 

i Was done it the switching of Ac and dc Both But they can work to the individual manner.

i.e. in a ac switching only ac supply is there to produce or contol the output and same manner dc only dc supply is there to be control the mosfet or as well as the the mosfet output.

 

But i am not sure about the the mosfet or gate controls via the controller or the dc supply .

and output is the ac signal it can be happen or not?

 

Thanks in advance. 

Last Edited: Wed. Aug 15, 2018 - 05:49 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello Jim ,

 

Right now nothing has be fixed. 

 

Right now i am only followed or want to complete this step or task as well as .

After Completion of this step i am going into the next step but right now my only focused on to the this step .

 

Thanks for Your Valueable advice for me.smiley

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Seegi---

 

You need to do a lot more of your own research, to at least understand the very basics of what you are asking....have you gone to any electronics websites and tutorials to learn about these things?  Dimmer maker tutorials?

Fill your head with at least the basic knowledge, otherwise we will get nowhere quickly (as we have already with 33 posts).  For example, it took 30+ posts for you to tell us you want to make a dimmer. Since your language is not English, this will lead to a much faster result for you, with fewer costly mistakes.  Then you can show us actual designs of what you are planning to make, NOT a spice drawing.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

Last Edited: Wed. Aug 15, 2018 - 04:50 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

jgmdesign wrote:
  you sure as heck do not need microsecond switching time for that

Indeed.

 

LED lighting MIGHT show something

Even though the LEDs themselves may respond in microseconds, the human eye can't see it!

 

Most people don't even notice the flicker at just 100 Hz !

 

as already said numerous times MOSFETS are not a good idea for thisYou do not need MOSFETS in order to control dimming with a microcontroller.

@seggi: Why do you keep ignoring this? Why do you specifically want to use MOSFETs ??

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

awneil wrote:
Why do you specifically want to use MOSFETs ??
A man with a boxful of MOSFETs with no useful home to go to perhaps? cheeky

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

laugh

 

Even then, as others have noted, there would be far better ways to play with a box full of surplus MOSFETs !

 

Especially as the OP her/himself says she/he has no knowledge of nor experience with MOSFETs, there's a whole load of standard, basic setups & experiments she/he should be doing first to gain sufficient experience to be able to tackle such as "oddball" project.

 

 

"To a person with only a hammer, every problem is a nail"

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Wed. Aug 15, 2018 - 09:15 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

awneil wrote:
"To a person with only a hammer, every problem is a nail"
Coincidence. When I typed #37 I initially typed a second paragraph to say "Bet OP is a man who knocks in screws with a hammer because he OWNS a hammer" but then I thought better of it and deleted it!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Also:

When one hardly has any knowledge of electronics nor electronic components, one should not be messin' with mains powered circuits yet.

Start by learning the basics on some low voltage isolated circuit.

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

To be fair, in #24, seggi wrote:
i am trying to switch 1,2,3 secondary output.

So (s)he's not switching the mains side.

 

However, I don't think the secondary voltage(s) has/have been specified.

 

#13 and #14 suggest that they may still be "high" voltage ...

 

surprise

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

To answer the OPs question...yes, you can switch AC using MOSFETs.

 

For example...

 

 

...or I use something like this on a number of products...

 

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello Guys,

 

 

Can i Switch Ac Wave to the Mosfet?

 

Please Tell Me once It is Possible or not?

 

If Yes Please Tell Me How Can i Do.

 

Till start to Yet i was trying everything but i don't Got the Any Solution.

 

And i Clearly said About the some Websites and blogs relates to my Question They are Totally For Purpose of Misguiding us.

 

i am Sticking to the step because some Reason behind of it.

 

Thank you so much Everyone for Spent Some your Valuable time for me.

 

i fill very glad for it.

 

Best Regards,

Seggi.

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Seggi.

I send you a pdf from ST some har a dimmer with mosfet,

see and use it!

or Yes you can use mosfet but no it is not easy and not good for high power. you will have minimum 0,7V + ron serie . 

and not forget 230Vac can be dangerous! 

Thierry Pottier

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

seggi wrote:
Please Tell Me once It is Possible or not?

Just because something is possible does not make it sensible or advisable or appropriate or ...

 

 

i am Sticking to the step because some Reason behind of it.

So tell us: what reason ??

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 3

Ok, I guess its time to be a hard liner................

 

Seggi, you have NOT answered any of the questions presented to you completely.  YOu have told us that you know next to nothing about MOSFETS, yet you want to control AC power with them which is not a trivial task for the experienced, much less a beginner.

 

Lets look at your last post #43:

 

seggi wrote:

Hello Guys,

 

 

Can i Switch Ac Wave to the Mosfet?

Already answered MANY TIMES.

 

Please Tell Me once It is Possible or not?

Already answered quite clearly MANY TIMES.

 

If Yes Please Tell Me How Can i Do.

Already done SEVERAL TIMES.  And why do we have to do your work?

 

Till start to Yet i was trying everything but i don't Got the Any Solution.

WTH?  YOu have shown NOTHING as to what you have actually done

 

And i Clearly said About the some Websites and blogs relates to my Question They are Totally For Purpose of Misguiding us.

YOu posted NO links to these websites so this is nonsense.

 

i am Sticking to the step because some Reason behind of it.

Yet you refuse to explain WHY. Which leads some of to believe that this is either a school project, or a commercial project.

 

Thank you so much Everyone for Spent Some your Valuable time for me.

WASTED time is more accurate.

 

i fill very glad for it.

YOu should be.  Anywhere else you would have been flamed for this nonsense

 

Best Regards,

Seggi.

 

 

So, here it is.  we are at over 45 posts and nothing has been accomplished.  If the following information is not provide the thread gets locked as this is looking like trolling.

 

1) What are the secondary voltages of your transformer?

2) What is the load you are looking to control?

3) How much power does this load require?

4) Commercial, or School project.

5) post a schematic of what your circuit actually looks like....not the ones you have posted so far.

6) post a link to the specifications of the transformer you are going to use.

 

Time for you to start working with us.  We have been more than patient

 

Jim - Moderator.

 

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 17, 2018 - 12:56 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

No solution?

I gave you 2 schematics in post #42.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Blah blah blah,

Blah bluh bla bla.

 

Reminds me of "fallen art".

Which is actually worth watching.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46QaOikFYhM

 

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Sat. Aug 18, 2018 - 12:36 AM