LCD labelled 12864A help requested

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#1
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hello guys

i've got an lcd with 12864A written on its back & no more details is available 

so how to know what kind of LCD is tht to start work with it ?

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 28, 2018 - 09:26 AM
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What's the controller chip got written on it?

What connections does it have?

Photo?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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johnny22 wrote:
to start work

So what is the goal here:

  • To get some work done?
  • To play around - possibly for a significant time - reverse-engineering this unknown product?

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As Brian says the key thing is the controller. A lot of the cheap and cheerful ones on ebay are KS0108 based. If so there is some polish software I've used in the past that seems quite good:

 

http://en.radzio.dxp.pl/ks0108/

 

But you do need to identify the controller chip to know if this is relevant

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Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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Unfortunately there are just too many things out there labelled "12864A". As almost all LCD of this aspect ratio are 128x64 resolution then the "12864" bit is inevitable, so only "A" is really a differentiator, but it's too widely used too. If the module has chip-on-board ICs under anonymous black blobs (as in that picture) then trying to determine the controller type could prove "fun"! But even if you do you still probably need the datasheet for the "module" as well as the "controller" simply to know the pin out on the edge connector.

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I have used several 12864 modules over the years and although many use the same number of pins (20), the pinouts can vary significantly.

Several years ago I had to design a module to allow use of some of those devices and found the following signal possibilities (not exhaustive):

Note the different power pinouts as well as signal placement...

 

 

 

David

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only 12864A is written on it & here is the picture of it

& the connection it has is as follow:BLK-BLA-VOUT-RST-CS2-CS1-DB7-DB6-DB5-DB4-DB3-DB2-DB1-DB0-E-R/W-D/I-VO-VDD-VSS

 

I guess as frog_jr Suggested its  KS0108

would you check plz?

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 28, 2018 - 02:02 PM
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Well, the images are certainly very similar, though not quite the same:

 

Perhaps try a Google Image Search on your photo - in various rotations ... ?

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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sure i want to use it for a project

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awneil wrote:
So what is the goal here:

  • To get some work done?
  • To play around - possibly for a significant time - reverse-engineering this unknown product?

 

johnny22 wrote:
would you check plz?

 

So maybe there should be a third option in the list:

 

  • Get someone else to reverse-engineer it for you

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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awneil wrote:

awneil wrote:
So what is the goal here:

  • To get some work done?
  • To play around - possibly for a significant time - reverse-engineering this unknown product?

 

johnny22 wrote:
would you check plz?

 

So maybe there should be a third option in the list:

 

  • Get someone else to reverse-engineer it for you

im just using this LCD for first time & any help will be appriciated

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Go on.   It is 99.9% obvious that you have a regular KS0108 display.

 

Try it for yourself.  Report back with the result(s).

 

David.

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johnny22 wrote:
im just using this LCD for first time 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

EDIT

 

So you've tried to save yourself a few quid by buying an unidentified, undocumented, unsupported module - that's a risk.

 

As David says, you're just going to have to take a risk and try it ...

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Wed. Mar 28, 2018 - 04:32 PM
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Looks like it has the Adafruit 188 pinout, with the KS0108 controller.

You should be able to connect it and use the appropriate library without too much difficulty...

(famous last words! wink)

David

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johnny22 wrote:
sure i want to use it for a project

1)  How much time have you spent on this quest of using an unknown LCD?

1a)  Do you even know if it works?

1b)  ...if not, how will you know when it is not working?

2)  How much does a known-quantity 128x64 monochrome display cost?  A new one with known provenance and excellent chance of being operational?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/12864B-...

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Yes - that was exactly my point in #3 !

 

EDIT

 

I don't see any mention at https://www.ebay.com/itm/12864B-... of what controller is used.

Nor any sample code, tutorials, etc.

 

As opposed to, say, https://www.adafruit.com/product... - for the extra $20, you get it mounted on a breadboard-friendly PCB with documentation, support, and examples

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Wed. Mar 28, 2018 - 07:00 PM
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awneil wrote:
for the extra $20, you get it mounted on a breadboard-friendly PCB with documentation, support, and examples

If it were not: OUT OF STOCK

 

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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awneil wrote:
I don't see any mention at https://www.ebay.com/itm/12864B-... of what controller is used. Nor any sample code, tutorials, etc.

Ummm--in some part, that was intentional to elicit responses from OP that are the same as yours...

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Go on.   KS0108 displays are pretty straightforward.   They have multiple CS pins e.g. CS1, CS2 for a 128x64.   CS1, CS2, CS3 for a 192x64.

 

Normally the CS are active-high.    Sometimes they are active-low e.g. /CS1

 

The pcb side should have the right number of components and blobs as a typical KS0108.

If the terminal pins are marked e.g. DB3, CS2, ... you can compare the wiring too.

 

David.

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was the KS0108 not also more or less standardized? Like the HD44780. a lot of different controllers around, but they can all be addressed as being a HD44780 and they will just behave like one if you stay inside the more standard commands.

so giving it a try using a KS0108 driver will not destroy it. what you could do is first find out what the supply pins are ( Not fully read all the comments) these you then can connect. then add 1K series resistors on all the other lines. that should keep ins from being destroyed by accidental shorts.

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In the past I think I've paid something like $5 for a 128x64 from  a known source with documentation. That might actually be the easiest answer!