Behold . . . new dip adapters are born...

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So yes, I love making/putting AVR's on DIP adapters...  The top is MEGA64A I plan to use for I/O with a Z80 and the bottom is TINY1614 so I can get down to playing with uPDI.

 

 

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No decoupling caps?

No Ground plane?

 

Are those vias tented? How do you get pins into them?

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com

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Paulvdh wrote:
How do you get pins into them?

Proto Advantage - SOIC-14 to DIP-14 SMT Adapter (1.27 mm pitch, 150/200 mil body)

http://www.proto-advantage.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=2200003

...

Bottom side of PCB has pads for two single row surface mount vertical headers.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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They are DIP adapters from proto-advantage.  It probably would be a good idea to put some caps on them, but they keep them generic not knowing what IC you plan to use.  I put them on the breadboard after I plug these in.

 

They have machined round pins on the bottom of them - you can't see it in the picture though...

 

EDIT - I think you can get some of proto-advantages products from Digikey, but they come with the square pin header.  I prefer the machined round pins to be kinder to my breadboards, so I end up ordering from them directly.  Their shipping is cheap at $4 though.

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 24, 2018 - 05:21 AM
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alank2 wrote:
It probably would be a good idea to put some caps on them, but they keep them generic not knowing what IC you plan to use.
BusBoard's adapter has pads for such :

BusBoard Prototype Systems​

AB-SOIC32+SSOP

Adapter Board for SOIC and SSOP ICs, Up to 32 Pins
http://busboard.com/AB-SOIC32-SSOP

 

or, could put all on a BusBoard thin (31mil, 0.8mm) SMT protoboard and scissor cut to fit.

BusBoard Prototype Systems

Surface Mount Prototyping PCBs

http://busboard.com/surfacemountpcbs

(search for thin)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Schmartboard's take :

Schmartboard

Schmartboard|ez 1.27mm Pitch SOIC to DIP adapter (204-0004-01)

http://schmartboard.com/schmartboard-ez-1-27mm-pitch-soic-to-dip-adapter-204-0004-01/

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Alan, PCBs look great.

 

How did you solder the Mega 64 Chip?

 

Why are the Chip's pads black in color?

 

JC

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Thanks DocJC - soldered by hand using thin solder, flux pen, and stereo microscope.

 

On the black, do you mean the tiny?  I think it is the lighting - they are silver.

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For the AVR adapters, do you place bypass caps close under chip, and pads for crystal and load caps? Oops, I read mention of not. On some generic adapters, I have installed 0304 smt caps close to chip by scraping solder mask, and placing cap.

It all starts with a mental vision.

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 25, 2018 - 12:42 AM
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I just put 100nF through hole caps on the breadboard.  When I do a crystal for it, it often works even without caps (capacitance from the breadboard?) but most of the time I put crystal caps too.  Always seems to work.

 

Now...I was having some very odd issues with my ATMEGA64A until I figured out they shipped it with the mega103 compatibility fuse turned on...

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On my computer the color of the pads looks black, hence the question.

I wanted to know if you were doing something interesting to your boards I wasn't familiar with!

 

Your soldering, by the way, looks waaaaay better than mine.

 

Good luck with your project!

 

JC

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Hi DocJC!!  It does - I noticed that after you pointed it out.  I'd love to say I was using some high tech laser CNC that heats solde paste, but it is good ole solder wire with a water soluble flux pen.  It would look much worse if I didn't have a stereo microscope mounted to my soldering desk.  I love using water soluble flux because I can water rinse it / blast it with compressed air and it always looks clean.

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alank2 wrote:
it is good ole solder wire with a water soluble flux pen. It would look much worse if I didn't have a stereo microscope mounted to my soldering desk. I love using water soluble flux because I can water rinse it / blast it with compressed air and it always looks clean.

 

That's how I learned to do it as well, so much better then solder paste/hot plates, at least for any thing but bga's which I leave for others to do.

 

Jim

 

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And two more!!!!

 

One is a 512K SRAM and the other is an RTC with a built in crystal (M41T93RMY6F).

 

You can see the pins on the bottom now!