ATTiny1616....My new goto AVR for "tiny' applications?

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I've got several 1617 and 1614's here.  The 1614 comes in a SOIC so it's very easy to solder by hand. Worst case you could solder small wires to the legs and mount it on a 100 mil breadboard - ugly be effective. Don't ask me how I know this...  Though, it's almost 2018, the death knell for DIP has long ago rung. Probably a good idea to lay in a supply of SOIC and QFN adapters.

 

In addition to all the peripherals, I love that these chips run with a 16 or 20 mhz intosc.  Plus I'm starting appreciate UPDI though I did splurge on an Atmel ICE. I do not miss debugWire.  It's too bad they didn't also support SPI for those that don't want go the ICE route.

 

The 161x series is quickly displacing other AVRs in my projects. No more Tiny85s for this guy.

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So far, nothing earth-shattering.

But, that doesn't really matter!

The hardware bus and tie ins to the other hardware modules are their in case you wish to use them.

 

I can't recall the last time I use an Analog Comparator built with the micro, or A.C.'s with adjustable thresholds, (Xmega), but its there if I ever want it.

 

The internal programmable logic module that first appeared in the Xmega E5 is certainly a nifty addition, albeit not used for anything important yet, or to save a chip from a design.

 

Having increased capability available is a great thing.

 

It is up to the designer to see how it might best be put to good use.

 

JC

 

 

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philba wrote:
Worst case you could solder small wires to the legs and mount it on a 100 mil breadboard - ugly be effective.
or solder SOIC onto 50mil protoboard or adapter.

philba wrote:
Though, it's almost 2018, the death knell for DIP has long ago rung.
Not for PIC

 


http://www.busboard.com/surfacemountpcbs#50

http://www.busboard.com/surfacemountpcbs#adapter

Microchip Technology Inc

Microchip

Press Release

Improve Response Time to Critical System Events on CAN Networks with New 8-Bit MCU with Core Independent Peripherals

The PIC18 K83 family makes CAN-based designs simpler and more cost effective

Chandler, Arizona, Nov. 13, 2017

https://www.microchip.com/pressreleasepage/improve-response-time-to-critical-system-events-on-can-networks

...

Each of these parts is available in 28-pin SPDIP, SOIC, ...

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

philba wrote:
Though, it's almost 2018, the death knell for DIP has long ago rung.
Not for PIC

That's about par for the course.

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philba wrote:
  Though, it's almost 2018, the death knell for DIP has long ago rung. Probably a good idea to lay in a supply of SOIC and QFN adapters

 

Chips keep getting smaller - my fat fingers remain the same size.  And my paws shake a bit these days.  S.

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  Though, it's almost 2018, the death knell for DIP has long ago rung. Probably a good idea to lay in a supply of SOIC and QFN adapters

 

8-bit micros will be extinct by 2019. Sadly, that's only one year away!  Very few 8-bitters will be available after the market shifts to the larger, more favored, more useful, more beautiful devices.

I've already thrown out hundreds of old chips & all of my development tools, waiting for announcements of the heralded replacements. 

I read about this 8-bit extinction several times during the last 20 years, so I've had time to get ready.  This is not like Y2K--this extinction has been discussed extensively every year and is right around the corner.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Denied.

 

There are lots of things that 8-bit microcontrollers do just fine, and they will persist.  Might become hobbyists devices, the same way that riding a horse used to be an essential skill and is now the province of hobbyists, but it's not going away.

 

See also the internal combustion engine.  Or the external combustion engine, if you really want to get esoteric.  Steam engines are heap good fun.

 

I have not thrown out my massive kit of drawers of various TTL chips.  That Mr. (Ms) avrcandies has does not reflect upon the rest of us.

 

And newer is never necessarily better.  Larger isn't always better.  More favoured isn't always better (Mr. Trump, anyone?).  And there is beauty to be found in simplicity.

 

S.

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 8-bit microcontrollers do just fine and they will persist

Here is an example statement excerpted from 1999:
Like a supernova that gradually fades to dwarf-star status, the market for 8-bit microcontrollers is slowly sliding into history. Dollar sales and average selling prices for 8-bit MCUs are both down as larger systems-on-silicon subsume the chips' programmable control functions.

What more proof do you need to get ready?  It's been 20 more years, man! That's a lot of nanoseconds!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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The sales of 8-bitters has continued  to grow, steadily, over those last 20 years. Market share has decreased, to be sure, but the value of the share it has, has grown as have the number of devices shipped. The prediction of the imminent demise of 8-bit micros is significantly overblown.

 

On the other hand, a number of microcontroller technologies have disappeared. Anyone remember bit-slice? Transputers? 4-bit micros? All gone. 

 

I argue that all of this shows only one thing and one thing only. Predicting the future of any particular microcontroller technology is nearly impossible. You are welcome to try, of course, only so long as you are prepared to be wrong.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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The sales of 8-bitters has continued  to grow, steadily, over those last 20 years

Yep, I always laugh when I read one of those many articles about 8-bitters going away.  I remember reading one around the time microchip was just getting the PIC off the ground (resurrected from an old gaming processor) & it was doom and gloom then for 8 bitters.  

By the way, 4-bitters might actually be around in large quantities in toasters, coffeemakers, etc....(though my info might be dated).

 

I just saw a crockpot on sale at Walmart with a web app so you can control /monitor from you phone via wifi (or maybe bluetooth).

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sun. Dec 24, 2017 - 06:05 AM
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Today I put together a single button debounce on an ATtiny1616 by using the event system and configurable custom logic as an RS latch.  Interesting that it turned out to be the same 70 bytes in length as snigelen's ex2.c single button debounce program.

 

The benefit of this debounce method is that there is no ISR or polling involved at all!  Push the button and you get a nice clean bounce free signal every single time.

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

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