Temperature Display

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I am a software developer looking to learn more about developing embedded systems. I know software development pretty well but lack EE knowledge. I may need some advice on how to go through this small project.

 

First I would like a simple micro controller. 

 

I was thinking about ordering this one

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDe...

 

I am not sure what I would need to order to install compiled code onto this micro controller or where to get the IDE or debugging tools? 

 

Then I think I can figure out how to power it and order the sensor and interface with the micro controller and display it on a few 7 segment displays.

Shane

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 17, 2018 - 02:06 AM
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Maybe you should start by reading this (3rd sticky from the top) wink  https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/p...

 

I'll move the thread.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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No stock and Obsolete.

 

Many of us would suggest an Arduino... a few dollars delivered free from China. It includes the crystal, voltage regulator, printed circuit board, interface to your PC's usb and the Arduino world includes an IDE, zillions of proven code interfacing every sensor you could imagine.

 

But if you really have your heart set on an obsolete chip... be my guest. cheeky

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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As already noted, Arduino must be the obvious answer here:

 

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction

 

If you really want to be a bit "closer to the metal", then get an Atmel Microchip XPlained board with the built-in debugger/programmer:

 

Xplained Pro: http://www.microchip.com/develop...

eg,

ATmega324PB Xplained Pro

 

Xplained Mini: http://www.microchip.com/develop...

ATmega328P Xplained Mini

 

Xplained Nano: http://www.microchip.com/develop...

ATtiny416 Xplained Nano

 

  

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

These will be recognised by Atmel Studio, and it will give you a whole set of ready-to-go examples specifically for the connected board.

 

 

 

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

 

#ArduinoXPlained

 

 

EDIT

 

Typo

 

EDIT 2

 

To clarify, XPlained Pro, Mini, and Nano are the ones the built-in debugger/programmer - other (earlier) versions don't have it.

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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Last Edited: Tue. Sep 4, 2018 - 12:06 PM
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chiefshane wrote:
I am a software developer

Might be helpful to expand on that - what kind of "software"? what kind of environment(s) are you familiar with? what languages, etc ...

 

 

For some basic electronics tips, see: https://electronicsclub.info/

 

Companies like Sparkfun and Adafruit have loads of good tutorials, and produce lots of easy-to-use modules with sensors and stuff ...

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Welcome to the Forum.

 

As noted above, an Arduino type, (there is a family of choices), would be a great starting point.

This will let you focus on interfacing the display and sensors, and you won't have to worry about the power connections, by-pass caps, Reset\ circuit, programming headers, power supply, etc.

 

Next:  As a general rule, start big.

That means don't start a project off with a small AVR Tiny type chip.

When you run out of pins or memory, your stuck.

 

Since an Arduino Uno with a Mega328P is only a couple of bucks, you can't possibly do better cost wise.

 

Getting a 7-segment LED display up and running is a great project, but not trivial is you are just starting out.

You might wish to consider getting a 2x16 Character LCD display also, as it is significantly easier to work with, and will get you up and running faster.

Then save the 7-Seg display as an additional project.

 

If you are just starting out you might also consider one of the Sensor Kits from Banggood Electronics.

They currently have a 45 sensor kit for $20 USD, (~ 50% off).

This will give you lots of sensors to tinker with at a give-away price.

 

JC

 

 

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DocJC wrote:
don't start a project off with a small AVR Tiny type chip.

+10

 

Cramming code into a severely-constrained chip is an art in itself:  this should be regarded as an advanced topic - not a starting point.

 

As   a "software developer", you should be aware of the saying, "premature optimisation is a root of all kinds of evil" ...

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...