How to understand AT32UC3A0512C and then coding

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#1
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Hello, 

I am new to AVR Microcontrollers. I want to write some specific code in any 32 bit AVR Microcontroller. I choose AT32UC3A0512C. For that, i want to understand how to enable GPIO, Timers, external interrupts. I watched many videos to understand 8-bit avr but I didn't find any video lecture of 32-bit avr. I can't be able to understand the date sheet. Plz, help me how can I start my work .. Thankyou

NAUREEN_SHAUKAT

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Do you realise the AVR32 is a dead end product? Whilst it was a fine product, it was never very popular. I'd suggest you start with something that has a bit more support.

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Actually, i just want the assembly of the code I have to write. My supervisor asks me to write a specific c code in 32-bit AVR Microcontroller. Plz, suggest me any website or lecture that explain 32-bit AVR Microcontrollers and their programming. 

NAUREEN_SHAUKAT

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NAUREEN SHAUKAT wrote:
My supervisor asks me

So go to your supervisor and ask for the necessary reference materials!

 

 I didn't find any video lecture of 32-bit avr.

As already noted, that is always going to be a fundamental problem with AVR32 - because it is a little-used product with, apparently, no future.

 

But maybe your supervisor knows this, and has chosen it deliberately so that you will have to think for yourself - rather than just copying online tutorials... ?

 

 I can't be able to understand the date sheet

Well, that is a fundamental skill for any microcontroller - in fact, for any electronic device.

 

If you really can't do that, then that is something that you urgently need to discuss with your supervisor!

 

If you want help with that, then you're going to have to say where, exactly, you are stuck?

 

 

My supervisor asks me to write a specific c code in 32-bit AVR Microcontroller

If your supervisor asks that, then (s)he thinks that you should be capable of doing it.

If (s)he's wrong about that, then you need to be discussing that with her/him ...

 

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Last Edited: Mon. Jan 1, 2018 - 11:22 AM
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Atmel Studio still supports the AVR32 methinks. Load that and the examples. That should get you started. You’ve got a bit of a learning curve ahead.

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Googling AT32UC3A0512C gives almost no hits, but "AT32UC3A" gives quite a few - did you try that?

 

Googling "AVR32" gets you the main family page: http://www.atmel.com/products/microcontrollers/avr/32-bitavruc3.aspx

 

Note that Microchip are going to shut down the Atmel domain very soon,  so I suggest you get over there ASAP and download everything you can find - before it's gone!

 

The 'Documents' tab has datasheets & Reference Manuals, etc.

 

The 'Overview' tab has a list of devices; each one is link to a device Product Page - so, from there, you can get to the Product Page for the AT32UC3A0512:

 

http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/AT32UC3A0512

 

In the 'Documentation' section, there is a long list - a couple of pages - of Application Notes.

 

Atmel Studio still supports AVR32 - so it will have example projects - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/c...

 

 

Learning to navigate supplier's websites is another key skill ... 

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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Kartman wrote:
You’ve got a bit of a learning curve ahead

I don't think it's actually any steeper than any other comparable processor (say, SAM-D).

 

There just isn't the wealth of support out there, so the student is actually going to have to do all the legwork and think for his/her self from first principles - rather than just copying from the interwebs.

 

Maybe this is why the teacher has chosen AVR32 ... ?

 

Or maybe the teacher is just out-of-touch.

 

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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awneil wrote:
Or maybe the teacher is just out-of-touch.

That gets my vote.
.
Or to put it another way, about 5..10 years ago the college poured $10,000's into buying those AVR32 dev boards and they are now going to flog them to death until they've amortised every last cent out of them!

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well, at least they're not still flogging the 8051 boards with the UV-EPROMs ...

 

cheeky

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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My money is on vindictive teachers.   They found it difficult when they were at University.    After all,   the Internet did not exist.   Software and hardware tools were crude.

 

So they want to inflict their pain onto their students.

 

Yes,   it might be that they want to amortise some old AVR32 dev boards.

But if they asked Microchip/Atmel,   the University would probably get some free replacements e.g. for ARM (or current products)

 

I am sure that AVR32 (UC32) has many virtues.    But young engineers want to enter employment with knowledge and experience of current chips.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
young engineers want to enter employment with knowledge and experience of current chips.

and the schools, too, should want to be able to demonstrate they they are preparing their students for the current work environment.

 

Perhaps the OP should point their supervisor - maybe also head of department - to this thread ... ?

 

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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david.prentice wrote:
But young engineers want to enter employment with knowledge and experience of current chips.
To a certain extent, I'm not sure that is valid. Technology moves so quickly, I have always given more credence to an applicant's methodology over specific knowledge. Schools should be focused more on teaching how to learn.

 

How many times are we pointing new arrivals to threads on "How to ask a question" or asking them to break a project into small manageable chunks (rather than trying to do everything at once)?

 

These are concepts that are applicable to most all aspects of life; however, it would seem all too often that students are too focused on getting to a result rather than the methods to obtain the (best) result...

David (aka frog_jr)

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frog_jr wrote:
Schools should be focused more on teaching how to learn.

Absolutely.

 

It has been said that the mark of a good education is not what you know, but that you know how to find out!

 

How many times are we pointing new arrivals to threads on "How to ask a question" or asking them to break a project into small manageable chunks

Or even just to read the datasheet, look at the resources on the Product Page, etc ?

 

 

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Yes,   I understand your point.

 

At the same time,   I feel that if a student is making progress during her studies it provides confidence.

If she can take advantage of all the modern tools at her disposal,   the new employee is more productive.

 

I am horrified by electrical students that do not understand Ohm's or Kirchoff's Laws.

 

A student who knows how to search for information and read the documentation / datasheets is far more useful than one who can write an ASM program but has no idea what it does.

 

There was a time when Calculators were frowned on.    I admire the youngsters that are familiar with CAD tools.    I might be able to do some ASM, C, ... but have no experience with CAD.

I know who would make a better employee.

 

David.

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also, it does not speak well for the educational institution if they are giving their students an inaccurate/outdated view of what the Real World is like...

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Atmel Studio 7 (Version: 7.0.1652) on Windows 10

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

 

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There are still ASF example project for the UC3A:

Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Atmel Studio 7 (Version: 7.0.1652) on Windows 10

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

 

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Lest this degenerate into a debate about the relative merits of different university education styles, I would like to suggest that (employable) students need a mix of real world practice and theory. This may sound easy but has big challenges:

 

A. How to proportion that mix

B. What constitutes "real world". Mega-size logic arrays vs 8-bit, 16-bit, or 32-bit micros vs gate level logic? Assembler vs C vs some bleeding edge environment?

C. And which theoretical stuff? Do you require electo-magnetic waves of all engineering students including Computer Engineering students? Materials science? Circuit design? 

D. How much math? How much "humanities" and "life sciences"?

 

Every institution has its answer and every teaching staff member has his or her own answer (not always in agreement). And, all of this is overlaid by finite number of class hours and finite student time. 

 

I am mentoring a group of Senior ECE students on a design project at Oregon State University (where I am now an "affiliate" - aka "retired"). One female, two males. None of them have had any industrial experience, yet. The project involves a mix of digital (including some mild DSP), and analog. Frankly, I am pretty impressed. They work together, well. Their experience is a bit short on the practical, but that is why this project exists. But, they seem to have a pretty good sense of what is practical and what is not. All this is combined with what appears to be pretty good theoretical knowledge. Personally, I am fairly impressed. I does give me more than a bit of hope.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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There was/is a whole series of AVR projects from Cornell University.

 

Very impressive from a design, technical and practical point of view.   But most importantly,  they wrote good documentation too.

 

I am guessing that the "well known" projects were from the top of the class students.

 

I suspect that the average student was of a lower quality.   And the "less able" students were a lot lower.

My main point was that students will work better with "meaningful" projects e.g. something they might find useful.

 

Achieving something that "works" gives confidence to the students.

 

My housemate from many years ago spent seven years attempting to propagate Coconut Palms by root tip cuttings - without success.

The following year,   his work with Cocoa plant propagation was successful.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
There was/is a whole series of AVR projects from Cornell University.
fyi, Bruce Land updated the lecture videos beginning at

#1 Course Introduction

by Bruce Land

Published on Dec 18, 2017

https://www.youtube.com/user/ece4760/videos

david.prentice wrote:
I suspect that the average student was of a lower quality.
Relative and subjective?

IIRC, a "gentleman C" student at Princeton University created one of the world's largest civil engineering firms.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Is that AVR 8 or 32 ?

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Bruce Land switched Cornell ECE4760 from mega644 to PIC32 (I don't recall the part number)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
fyi, Bruce Land updated the lecture videos beginning at #1 Course Introduction by Bruce Land Published on Dec 18, 2017 https://www.youtube.com/user/ece...

 

Lecture #1:

Third lab will be a video game. [..] The interesting thing here is that the way we're grading this is by the number of balls you can animate.

 

[Adjective use of verb denoting sexual intercourse] brilliant!

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