Is the XMega going End of Life (EOL) ???

Go To Last Post
28 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi and Seasons Greetings,

I was just looking to start some new projects using the bigger XMega chips ie ATXMega128 or 256 and I notice on the Microchip website that the only XMegas that are listed are the XMega16 and XMega32.

 

Neil.

Kind Regards,

Neil Wrightson.

Last Edited: Mon. Dec 25, 2017 - 12:02 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Please click "Show ALL Products" on that page.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Jan 4, 2018 - 04:16 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

http://www.microchip.com/docs/default-source/announcements-documents/newyear-2018-letter-from-steve-and-ganesh.pdf

January 3, 2018

...

We at Microchip have a 25-year practice of letting you, our clients, decide when we discontinue a product: We call it client-driven obsolescence. Until you decide you no longer need a product, we will continue to supply it, year in and year out.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

gchapman wrote:

We at Microchip have a 25-year practice of letting you, our clients, decide when we discontinue a product: We call it client-driven obsolescence. Until you decide you no longer need a product, we will continue to supply it, year in and year out.

...

That is quite a reassuring sales pitch, especially this paragraph;

 

If your current supplier is causing you to bear the cost and disruption of redesigning your products because they are no longer making theirs, we urge you to consider Microchip as a replacement to that supplier.  We won’t let you down, and we’ll help you make the transition.

 

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

How's beautiful Newcastle Neil? hmmm he must be on holidays.....

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

js wrote:

How's beautiful Newcastle Neil? hmmm he must be on holidays.....

Yep... school principals get holidays also.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 Until you decide you no longer need a product, we will continue to supply it, year in and year out

Hmm ... and how is that decision communicated from the client to Microchip?

 

Presumably, by sales numbers?

 

But I might still need a product even when I haven't actually placed an order for it lately; I might have stock "for now", but need to re-order when that's gone.

 

So how would microchip know this ?

 

EDIT

 

And, presumably, they're not going to keep a product going just for one customer taking a few chips a year ... ?

 

In other words: there must, surely, be some caveats on that ?

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Thu. Jan 4, 2018 - 12:58 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

awneil wrote:

In other words: there must, surely, be some caveats on that ?

 

I'm not an expert on Microchip but I've often seen it written, and not disputed, that there's only a handful of chips in the PIC line that have been discontinued and that was because the process became unsupportable. And for those chips a direct drop-in replacement exists.

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

awneil wrote:

And, presumably, they're not going to keep a product going just for one customer taking a few chips a year ... ?

 

In other words: there must, surely, be some caveats on that ?

 

I don't know about Microchip, but Linear claimed they still (can) make all the chips they have ever sold. Linear started in 1981. They have a process using the same starting point and can produce rather small patches. I don't know if that  is still valid after Analog Devices bought them. In Linear's case there is a minimum order (few hundred pieces typically) for rare parts not stocked.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The main problems with Microchip at the moment are them doubling prices and having supply issues.

 

Even basic stuff you need to get started like the AtmelICE doubled in price as soon as they took over, and the parts themselves have been going up too.

 

It doesn't help if they keep making parts but charge you so much for them that the product isn't viable any more.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Adding my 2 cents...

 

I have a new product designed that uses the ATxmega256A3U, fully implemented with a TON of code. I wanted to check the online datasheet for something, and like the OP, I found that that micro isn't even listed.

 

As to the response above about "Please click 'Show ALL Products' on that page.", there is no such link or option. Even when using Full Parametrics, again, only the ATxmega16 and ATxmega32 show.

 

I checked Mouser: they have about 4000 in two different part numbers. The factory lead shows 12 weeks; the "View Delivery Dates" link for the ATxmega256A3U doesn't do anything. They have 720 on order.

 

Is it just me, or does the "Until you decide you no longer need a product, we will continue to supply it, year in and year out ..." seem odd against the backdrop of the fact that the chip is not listed in the front end of the site? I have to say that I'm growing uncomfortable with the situation. Moreover, I don't really like being forced to start over again with PIC. (I'm not here implying the PIC is either better or worse than the AVR; I am saying that I don't relish the thought of a brand new learning curve. And, does Atmel Studio support the PIC, or do I have to learn a new IDE as well? Arrgghhh...)

 

BTW: Just  in case, even though the ATxmega256 has only a single 16-bit instruction (or so...), I checked that it was not listed in the 16-bit group; it wasn't.

 

I know that "business" sometimes defies logic, but ATMEL: WHY DID YOU SELL TO MICRCHIP?

 

The SiliconHacker  Plano, TX  www.siliconhacker.com

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 19, 2018 - 10:13 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I get the impression that Microchip isn't interested in Atmel's 8 bit stuff, they just wanted the ARM portfolio and to get rid of some competition that was driving down prices.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

David (aka frog_jr)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Phoenix710 wrote:
The factory lead shows 12 weeks; ...
12w may be correct.

microchipDIRECT shows exceptional stock except for 105C and low stock for QFP in reels.

Phoenix710 wrote:
Is it just me, or does the "Until you decide you no longer need a product, we will continue to supply it, year in and year out ..." seem odd against the backdrop of the fact that the chip is not listed in the front end of the site?
Not odd as the effort to close atmel.com had glitches.

Phoenix710 wrote:
And, does Atmel Studio support the PIC
No

Phoenix710 wrote:
... or do I have to learn a new IDE as well?
Eventually yes (MPLAB X); that might be good as, IIRC, you're a dual operator (Atmel Studio, Visual Studio)

I'd be surprised if Atmel Studio Visual Studio Isolated Shell is updated from 2015 to 2017.

Am glad that some Atmel Studio defects are corrected and the part packs are maintained.

Might consider Microsoft Visual Studio as an alternate as AVR can be added to it (that's definite by third party though by extension would be better for debugger integration)

Phoenix710 wrote:
... ATMEL: WHY DID YOU SELL TO MICRCHIP?
A moot question? wink


http://new.microchipdirect.com/product/search/all/ATxmega256A3U

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/come-join-us-mplab-now-supports-avrs?page=1#comment-2369976

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

mojo-chan wrote:
I get the impression that Microchip isn't interested in Atmel's 8 bit stuff, ...
There is interest in tiny and mega with XMEGA as "in maintenance".

I'd be surprised by new XMEGA models or by new features in existing XMEGA; some surprise would be by a die revision.

 

XMEGA (by memory) from Microchip PCN :

XMEGA A1U in 0.8mm pitch BGA - additional assembly site, PdCu bond wire

XMEGA B3 - new tape for reels

XMEGA C3 - new tape for reels (except XMEGA384C3)

XMEGA D3 - new tape for reels 

XMEGA E5 - additional assembly site

 

http://www.microchip.com/pcn (Notification, pull-down menu, CPN, enter part, Search)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I hope they keep the Atmel tools going. The Microchip debuggers, the ICD range, are total crap.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I've been a long-time supporter of Microsoft Visual Studio (~1995), from which the Atmel Studio IDE is built. The Visual Studio/Atmel Studio IDE is a very tough act to follow. The features, editor and stability are superb.

 

I typically debug my products using the JTAG interface thru the Dragon; it works pretty well and has been mostly stable. And, the IDE/JTAG debug process moves seamlessly between C++ and AVR assembly depending on the view I choose. It's been powerful and effective.

 

Is the Microchip ICD not stable? Not integrated well with single-stepping thru code (either high-level or assembly)?

 

As you've experienced, what are the issues with it? (I'm asking because I may, in fact, be forced to support some PIC micros in the near future.) Thanks.

The SiliconHacker  Plano, TX  www.siliconhacker.com

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The ICDs are not all that reliable, and they are very expensive. In use they seem to have problems programming targets on some boards. They are overly complex, needed a hefty firmware download whenever you change MCU family. Sometimes this download fails, and on a good day it takes minutes to apply.

 

They are in no way comparable to the AtmelICE, which is reliable and fast.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

mojo-chan wrote:

The main problems with Microchip at the moment are them doubling prices and having supply issues.

 

Even basic stuff you need to get started like the AtmelICE doubled in price as soon as they took over, and the parts themselves have been going up too.

 

It doesn't help if they keep making parts but charge you so much for them that the product isn't viable any more.

 

Which parts have had supply issues and prices going up? I have bought ATXMEGA64D4-AU at 100 pcs from Digi Key and Mouser. 12/2013 I payed 1.56€, 12/2015 2.67€, 2/2017 2.88 € and now the price would be 2.66/2.63€. Both have it on stock. So the price for this chip went up 12/2013->12/2015 way before Microchip and has since then been quite constant.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The A3U range seems to have gone up. I think the E5 as well, but I can't be bothered to check the data.

 

The price of tools like the AtmelICE and some of the evaluation boards doubled overnight after Microchip took over. It's like they resent Atmel having good, cheap tools when their own ones are expensive crap.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Remember that prices are often determined by global exchange rates over which manufacturers have no control.

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

mojo-chan wrote:
... and on a good day it takes minutes to apply.
Is download to ICD 4 faster than ICD 3?

 

Microchip Technology Inc

Microchip

DV164045 - MPLAB ICD 4 In-Circuit Debugger

http://www.microchip.com/developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DV164045

http://microchipdeveloper.com/icd4:start

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I don't know, I have not tried the ICD4 yet. It's very expensive and I don't have any reason to buy one right now.

 

Mike of Mike's Electric Stuff reviewed one, didn't see very impressed by it. Hopefully the programming voltage boost circuit is more reliable than the ICD3, but I see to recall he was not impressed by it.

 

Also, Microchip programming headers need more pins than Atmel ones. Atmel are pretty good with getting the number of pins needed down to 1 or 2.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

mojo-chan wrote:

Atmel are pretty good with getting the number of pins needed down to 1 or 2.

 

Yes, but it's taken them 6 (or is it 7?) attempts.

 

10-pin ISP

6-pin ISP

debugwire

PDI

TPI

uPDI

HVPP

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Debugwire is 1 pin. PDI is 2 pins. In fact I think they are all 1 or 2 pins apart from ISP and HVPP.

 

We don't count the ground and power because they don't eat up I/O pins and don't usually require special routing. Having said that I wish Atmel would offer better 1.27mm pitch connectors.

 

The other issue with Microchip ones is that they are a bugger to integrate into automated test gear.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

As noted in https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... the XMega256/192/128/64 datasheet is still the Atmel version - it has (so far) escaped the Microchipification of the documents.

 

I wonder if that says something about Microchip's intentions for it ... ?

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...