Disconnect the programmer wire

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Hi, my English is not so good.
Please help me connect the programmer's wires.

For example:

a=1 

b=3

c=2

Thanks

 

 

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 15, 2017 - 01:59 AM
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There is not enough facts given to answer your question.

 

What board is this? Do you have a manual in in electronic format that we can see? Do you have a schematic diagram in electronic format that we can see?

 

Is there any facts about the board in a web page in English?

 

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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I did not find this delegation on the Internet at all

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If you expect anyone to help you then you will have to post photos that do not show the PCB hidden by wires and that do not have glare on them.

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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ahmadsaibar wrote:
I did not find this delegation on the Internet at all

Where did you get this board?

Did it come with any documentation at all?

Is there any marking ob the board itself that suggests maker and possibly model?

 

The chances might be slim for us to give any meaningful answer.

 

The markings by the empty socket suggests that this board is designed for quite old ACVR models. If you tell us what you actually want to do then we might suggest cheap alternatives, available on web-shops. There are modern, ready-to-use AVR development boards available for a few US$ (US$ 5-10 or so?). Some sellers offer free shipping with the drawback that it might take a month or so before it arrives at your end.

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
 you will have to post photos that do not show the PCB hidden by wires and that do not have glare on them.

and show the entire board!

 

EDIT

 

Note that sometimes it is possible to get a good image of  board by placing it on a scanner.

 

It depends on the scanner.

 

Worth a try ...

 

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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Last Edited: Thu. Dec 14, 2017 - 08:19 PM
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The chip we can't see is a microcontroller. Which is likely to mean that the flying lead is a serial port. Which might mean that the board needs software to drive it. Or, IIRC, there is an Atmel apps note with a simple programmer and this might be a clone of that.

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
... likely to mean ... might mean ... might be a ...

 

Reminds me of a boss of mine once heard to say, "So - we have a clear way forward based on three unknowns..."

 

laugh surprise

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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I'll put money on it being an AVR910 programmer. The circuit looks very close.

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?" - Me

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I'm going to assume that this is an AVR device programmer from about 15 years ago when AVRs were mostly dual-in-line pin packages.  There are four wires shown that connect this device programmer to (most likely) a serial port on a PC.   These wires are connected to a telephone jack and use standard (for year 2000) telephone cable to connect between the PC and this device programmer.   These wires are MOSI, MISO, SCK, and ground.  

 

Serial ports from this era were in 9-pin D-connectors (because the connector shell was shaped like an English letter capital 'D').  The PC put out serial signals that were +9v for logic LOW and -9 volts for logic HIGH  (called RS232 hardware signal format).  The transistors and discrete components on this device programmer ​convert this RS232 to +5v logic HIGH and 0v logic LOW, which is what the AVR expects for its programming voltage.  This device programmer ​uses a program on the PC to send the MOSI/MISO/SCK signals out of the serial port's modem control pins, like DTR(data terminal ready) and CTS (clear-to-send).   Most likely, the AVRdude.exe program can be used to send the assembled/compiled hex file to this device programmer.

 

To use this device programmer, you need to trace out the circuit schematic to determine which modem signals are being used for MOSI/MISO/SCK.  While it is possible to use this programmer, it will be a challenge to get it working again.  If you can receive eBay shipments from China in your country, then I suggest that you get an USBasp programmer for a few dollars/euros from China.  It will be easier to use with stand-alone AVR ICs.  I would recommend that you get several Arduino Nano module boards for a few dollars/euros each from eBay China.  This is the easiest way in the entire world to get an AVR hardware system functioning so that you can concentrate on programming your application rather than trying to get 20-year-old microprocessor development kits working again.   Seriously, you could get this board working, but it wouldn't be worth the time and effort.

 

 

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Simonetta wrote:
These wires are MOSI, MISO, SCK, and ground.  

Then how do you assert the /RESET with four lines?

 

I would think that the telephone cable is the RS-232 connection to the PC.  Possibly the Micro under the Wire wrapped around the board interfaces with the PC, and uses its SPI to program the other AVR, with a GPIO used for /RESET control?

 

Simonetta wrote:
t will be easier to use with stand-alone AVR ICs.  I would recommend that you get several Arduino Nano module boards for a few dollars/euros each from eBay China.  This is the easiest way in the entire world to get an AVR hardware system functioning so that you can concentrate on programming your application rather than trying to get 20-year-old microprocessor development kits working again.   Seriously, you could get this board working, but it wouldn't be worth the time and effort.

+1

 

Jim

 

EDIT: Moved to the DEbugger/programmers forum

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Last Edited: Fri. Dec 15, 2017 - 02:00 AM