cheapest AVR programmer

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Hi Guys,
Anyone knows of a cheap AVR programmer? I am not looking for ISP or ICE just a programmer that I can use to program the flash of my AVR with my program outside my app.
Thanks.

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If you have time on your side, checkout the link in my signature.

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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great site, Plans. I will definitely read it. Just to cut to the chase so to speak, I have a laptop with only a USB port. Will this programmer work with a USB port?

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I was looking for something in which you can put the chip in (like one of those old EEPROM programmers), burn the flash and then use it in your app.

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Quote:
Will this programmer work with a USB port?

No. That note is also on that page ;)

I googled with the keywords "usb avr programmer", and the first page shows lots of low-cost USB programmers.

Quote:
I was looking for something in which you can put the chip in (like one of those old EEPROM programmers), burn the flash and then use it in your app.

Consider a Dragon: $50 You can add a ZIF-socket, and use jumper-wires to connect the correct pins to the ISP-header.

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Thanks for your patience, Plans.

I also saw this link:
[url]
http://www.ladyada.net/make/usbt...
[/url]

So can I use this and connect the MISO,MOSI,etc. pins to a header as attached?
Is that all I will need?

Attachment(s): 

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Ladyada's USB programmer should work fine.

If you have a look at this ATMEL Application Note, AVR042, Section 4, Connecting ISP Lines, it illustrates an AVR 6-Pin Header and 10-Pin Header layout which is used by many Atmel and compatible devices. (Atmel Standard ?). It can be found Here .

The illustration is a top down view, by the way.

The 6-Pin and 10-Pin cables which are part of Ladyada's USB programmer are designed to simply connect to the above 6 or 10 pin layouts.

You certainly may use your own ISP Header configuration, but then you will need a configuration / jumper cable to convert the Atmel Standard to your own design.

If you are just starting out use the 6-Pin version, and stick with it for all of your work.

JC

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"cheapest" always boils down to a question of how much you value your own time. Let's say you put your value at $10/hour. Do you think you can build and debug a homebrew programmer in the 3hours 24 minutes that you could have saved up the $34 that an AVRISPmkII costs or the 5 hours that a Dragon (including ICE) costs? Or if on a real budget, just save 2 hours and get a Butterfly and put a copy of Dean's "Buttload" into it. All these make for pretty reliable, no-nosense programming solutions that simply work, no mess, no fuss.

Or you can spend several days + sleepless nights and lose a lot of hair battling with something that might just work with a bit of a following wind if you are lucky.

If you value your spare time at more than $10/hour (personally I do) then the commercial solution looks even more attractive for a stress free life.

YMMV

Cliff

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Thanks, guys.
Cliff, I am in a quandary here. Like I mentioned in another post, I am trying to get this project (clock + thermometer) completed. I am battling low cost and speed(time) here both of which I know are difficult to satisfy simultaneously.
So for now, I am planning to buy the Ladyada programmer and build the micro part on a breadboard. This way (if it works and I know Cliff, I will send you a pic. of my hair before I start working on it and after I am done) I will have some flexibility to program multiple micros as well.

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Quote:

I will have some flexibility to program multiple micros as well.

You get the same flexibility (possibly more so?) with Atmel solutions too - and they just work

Cliff

PS OK, there's some question about the Dragon unless you are "gentle" with it.

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well.. *the* cheapest programmer I've ever used was five wires crammed into a parallel port (using avrdude), but lappys don't have those, and rarely have rs-232 ports either.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
-- Douglas Adams

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ok guys, I got my ladyada kit. Looks good so far.I am populating the board now. Will let you know how it works out.

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Ok I am done assembling my USB programmer from ladyada. I connected it to the USB port and saw the green LED glow (woohoo!). I am planning to use a breadboard with a 6 pin header but I am stuck on the AVR side. I am planning to provide separate power to my M48 micro and have not connected the jumper on the ladyada kit. I have also installed the USB drivers from the Ladyada website.

What are the steps I have to follow to program my M48?

What do I have to select in AVRstudio when the programming screen pops up?

If I just connect the ladyada 6 pin connector to the 6 pin header on my breadboard and try to program my M48 with AVRStudio with 5V power, will it work?
Thanks again for your help.

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Hi Guys, any suggestions on this? Thanks.

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Most of us use Atmel programmers that just simply work with Studio, no questions asked. I guess you need to try and track down someone else who's actually using this Ladyada design but are you sure it operates using a protocol supported by Studio (Avrprog, STK500v2, etc) otherwise you'll have to use avrdude to drive it.

(by the way I presume it came with a manual to say what software to use to drive it?)

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Thanks for your feedback,Cliff. Maybe I should have stuck with the proven solutions like you suggested earlier. But now that I bought this, I need to make it work.

No, it did not come with a manual. But from the ladyada website, it seems like the path to get it working is this:

PC Serial Port --> COM bridge ---> makes 2 virtual COM ports (one for AVRISP and another for AVRStudio) --> program chip using AVRISP in AVRStudio

I have a laptop and don't have serial ports.How can I do this with a USB port?

Is this even do-able?

What would the process be if I used AVRDude?

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I think you need to do some more reading on LadyAda's site: you are missing the clue: theprogrammer is connected via USB, and the SW on your PC (LadyAda's drivers) will make that USB-device pop-up on your PC as a COM-port. Gottit now ?

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Ok that makes sense.Which means the simple 6 pin ISP header should work with a M48 on a breadboard and a separate power supply. In AVRStudio, I will try using AVRISP. I am going to try this and see what happens.
Thanks for your patience. I am total newbie at this and going through the "steep" learning curve.

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LOL--I think I'm missing something here. When you got the "kit", was the AVR already programmed?

If not, you had better start a thread on "cheapest AVR programmer" to get a device to program it.

If it >>is<< already programmed, is there a great benefit to this kit vs. ATAVRISP2? And it will do everything that the ATAVRISP2 will do, such as varying target levels, and Xmegas, and Tiny10s, and ... ?

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Is your usbTinyIsp working already?
I'm just curious because I recommended that project to a friend of mine.

I also noticed that you were working on a project for a clock and a thermometer. I just did both those projects.
Just have a look at:
http://members.ziggo.nl/paulvdh/

I also noticed you said you're "just" a beginner. Maybe my projects are a little bit to big for you.
Why are you in a hurry?

Have Fun, Paul.

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com

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FWIW, I did not buy the kit, but built the USBTiny programmer using the provided schematic and a tiny2313 programmed for it using a serial port programmer.

It has worked very well. To program with avrdude in Linux, I use the command:

avrdude -p PART_NAME -c usbtiny -v -U flash:w:FILENAME

where PART_NAME is the name of the microcontroller as recognized by avrdude (e.g., tn261 for a Tiny261--see the avrdude manual for the full list) and FILENAME is the name of the hex file to be uploaded to flash. I believe the command would be the same for other operating systems.

I find that the first time I plug it into the USB port and run avrdude, it sometimes won't recognize the chip. Unplugging and re-plugging it into the USB port solves the problem. HTH,

-Jim

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the cheapest programmer available for AVR is serial AVR programmer. goto below link for circuits and description

 

http://gadgetsfive.blogspot.com/...

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dineshkumar0611 wrote:

the cheapest programmer available for AVR is serial AVR programmer. goto below link for circuits and description

 

But what PC has a real serial port?  A usbasp is cheap and easy to use!

Sorry for updating an old post! 

 

Jim

 

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ki0bk wrote:
But what PC has a real serial port? A usbasp is cheap and easy to use!

Clicking through on the link, there are still a number of components.  Perhaps they are "free" from the junk box.  But you still have parts plus board plus connectors.  Then you have the time to build and test.  And in the end you have a slow programmer.  The USBASP is delivered to your door for a couple bucks.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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ki0bk wrote:

dineshkumar0611 wrote:

the cheapest programmer available for AVR is serial AVR programmer. goto below link for circuits and description

 

But what PC has a real serial port?  A usbasp is cheap and easy to use!

Sorry for updating an old post! 

 

Jim

 

Quite many PC's still actually have com port, the header is on the motherboard, but the connector is rarely found on the PC case.

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Still, the old serial programmers are slow and unreliable, while the usbasp is much faster and cheaper, but I repeat myself!

I'm done!

Jim

 

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But what PC has a real serial port?

I have 4 on mine. wink

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Hello,

   The best answer for the question "what's the best cheap AVR programmer?" for 2017 is to use a USBasp module as in this eBay listing:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-AVR-...

 

This module plugs into a PC's USB port on one side and the AVR's ISP pins (MOSI, MISO, SCK, reset, Vcc, Gnd) on the other side.  The operating software is avrdude.exe.  There are several good tutorials on this program's use.  There are many sellers of this device on eBay.  I suggest selecting one that includes the 6-pin-to-10-pin conversion dongle since it is often useful in AVR development.

 

You will need to load a driver for Windows.  In Win10, you also must "disable driver signature enforcement" before loading the driver that runs the USBasp module.  On my PC, this driver is libUSB. When this driver is correctly installed, the USBasp device programs all AVR devices well, along with reading/writing the AVR fuses and oscillator_calibration registers.

 

There is a response above that recommends an inexpensive JTAG interface/programmer.  I suggest avoiding this device because it only works on a few obsolete AVR models.  If your PC has a physical serial or parallel port (unlikely, but possible), then you could also use an old cheap parallel programmer and the software found at https://sbolt.home.xs4all.nl/e-s... I don't recommend this: I recommend using the USBasp for any modern ISP programming.

 

If you are using the Mega328P AVR device, by all means ignore everything written in this message and all the other messages above.  Get instead an Arduino Nano clone from eBay or BangGood.com for about $3.  This development board has a bootloader embedded in its flash and is MUCH easier to set up and use than any ISP programming device.  You will still need to install a driver for the CH340G IC that converts USB to serial on the Arduino.   This is the best place for any AVR beginner to start because any simple beginner's project has a much greater chance of actually working when launched from the Arduino IDE.  Professional embedded-systems engineers/developers loath the Arduino, but for Muggles, electronic technicians, and ordinary people trying to do simple straight-forward microcontroller application development, it is the best of all the options available.

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 7, 2017 - 10:39 PM
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ki0bk wrote:
But what PC has a real serial port?  A usbasp is cheap and easy to use!
IIRC a tinyAVR 1-series can be programmed via a USB CDC dongle.

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/cant-figure-out-how-program-attiny817#comment-2034271

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Future spammer attempting to lay a legitimate trail...?
 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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This is a Do It Yourself home made AVR Programmer kit, it is a combination of USBASP Programmer and Target Microcontroller in a single board. 

 

The programmer is a USBASP bootloaded Atmega 8, i also used Atmega 8 as a Target microcontroller because it is enough for projects i am going to do and it is cost efficient, but you can also use Atmega 328 as a Target if you wish.

 

Since i made it for study purpose. I break some design rules in this board. like i used the micro USB in the bottom of the board.

 

Parts:

Atmega 8 - 2 Nos

USB = Micro USB female port

D1-D3 = Zener diode 3.9v

Q1 = 12 MHz crystal oscillator

Q2 = 16 MHz crystal oscillator

R1, R2 = 680 ohms

R3, R4 = 4.7K ohms

C1-C9 = 100 nF Capacitor

C10 = 4.7 uF/63V capacitor

L1 = 100uH

SW1 = Reset switch

 

 

 

 

LEE - Learn Experiment and Enjoy

 

 

To know how to make PCB in home goto this link:  DO IT YOURSELF: HOME MADE PCB BOARDS

 

We are going to use only mobile data cable for power supply and programming. so i have removed rectification and regulator unit because the output of a USB is always 3.7v to 5v and it does not require any rectification further. And also you can use your mobile charger as power instead of buying AC Adapter.

 

 

 

I used Cadsoft Eagle for Designing PCBs.

Click Here to download: PCB Layout

 

 

 

Feel free to ask questions.

 

 

You may also like:

Loading USB ASP bootloader into Atmega 8
DO IT YOURSELF: HOME MADE PCB BOARDS
DO IT YOURSELF: HOME MADE POWER BANK

 

Home made mini UV exposure box

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So why build a programmer when you can purchase a USBasp from aliexpress or ebay for less then the cost of the M8, not counting the pcb and the other components?

This is his second post about this, it's beginning to sound like spam.

 

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274
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This is looking a lot like spam!

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