Atmel Studio does not recognize the UC3-A3 XPLAINED

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Hi,

I just received my board today. However, I connected the board through USB but Atmel Studio does not recognize it at all. I tried to look at the Tool section but no tools or no devices. ( I tried to install FLIP and successfully connected the board by holding the button then connect USB). 

Please anyone helps!

 

Thanks.

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Any particular reason for choosing this chip at this time?

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

Is Atmel Studio even supposed to recognise it? Don't you need an XPlained-Pro for that ... ?

 

http://www.atmel.com/tools/UC3-A...

 

Did you study the Getting Started Guide and/or the Hardware User Guide?

 

Look on the 'Documents' tab of the Product Page:

 

http://www.atmel.com/tools/UC3-A...

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I mean like, i created a new project, I put something simple into the code and then build. But, how can I put the code into the board itsefl ? That's what confused me :( I got the board from the school and I need to deal with it. 

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trongtriet wrote:
how can I put the code into the board itsefl ?

RTFM!

 

I got the board from the school and I need to deal with it. 

Then speak to your teachers for assistance!

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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First thing I'd check is whether it actually enumerates as a USB device in Windows and, if so, which one.

 

Get a copy of a tool such as usbdeview.exe and see if that can "see" the board at all. If even that fails then you have some pretty fundamental connection problem!

 

I just had a flick through the "Getting Started" guide that Andy linked to and two things strike me about it. First is that it tells you that you need a driver file from the associated .zip file for Windows to recognise it. But it also talks about using Studio 4 or AVR32 Studio. That suggests this is a very old, out dated board and I have NO IDEA why it even mentions Studio 4 - that has never provided AVR32 support?

 

In this day and age you will likely want to use Studio 7.

 

To program it the getting started guide says that you hold SW0 down while you power it up so that the chip goes into Bootloader mode. When you do that I don't think Studio 7 is going to "see" it. In bootloader mode it acts as USB-DFU device and Atmel's program for the other half of that dialog is a Java program called FLIP. As far as I know FLIP is not built into Studio. So you will need to run this as a separate thing alongside Studio. So you use studio to write and build C code and that generates a .hex file then you will switch across to FLIP and use that to send the .hex to the DFU bootloader which will burn the code into the chip.

 

EDIT: and now I just re-read post #1 and you said:

( I tried to install FLIP and successfully connected the board by holding the button then connect USB). 

so I'm not entirely sure I understand what you think is wrong? You can connect to and program the board - what more do you require? Is it that you were thinking FLIP functionality would be built into Studio? It isn't. So you will create with Studio and program with FLIP separately.

 

If you get a more modern "Xplained" board you will probably find it has an on-board USB debugger that is recognized and can be controlled directly by Studio - but this old dinosaur isn't one of those.

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 16, 2017 - 01:36 PM
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clawson wrote:
this is a very old, out dated board

Indeed - jut look at the dates on those documents!

 

This undoubtedly means that the school has had it for years, and it has been used by many previous generations of students.

 

Therefore the staff will be thoroughly familiar with it and how to support it - so, again, ask your teachers !!

 

Remember: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Thats right, this AVR32 MCU is not for beginners:

-complexity of this 32bit controller

-lacking documentation, support...

For start you should choose an 8bit AVR, XMEGA is fine.

Maybe those are the worst described parts in Atmel history ever. Some typical tasks can be solved with ASF, but as for programming from zero, it needs some (reasonable) effort.

But be aware, AVR32 is not death, and still beats some Cortex.

I hope Atmel/MC will support them till the end of world.
 

Teddy_CZ

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Well, this school has chosen AVR32 as appropriate to this course, and this board as appropriate to the assignment - so they must be assuming that students who are keeping up should, at this stage of the course, be able to cope with this stuff ...

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Hi,

Thank you very much for all of you guys help. I figure out now. I took a look at the documents but all of them are outdated. Therefore, I was confused before.

But now, I understand the process. I need the hex file and then use FLIP.

I will try to keep up.

 

Thanks.

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trongtriet wrote:
I took a look at the documents but all of them are outdated.

As was pointed out to you in the very first reply in this thread, the board itself is outdated - so you're going to have to use contemporary (ie, outdated) documentation with it!

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Ok. I figured out the problem. The JTAG cable came with the debugger kit was made in reverse ( and it's weird ). I just asked some helps to adjust the cable and then magically the program runs....