Split from LM75 through hole alternative

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Don't be afraid of SMD. The first time I tried it with my plain soldering iron, I decided to forget DIPs. Get yourself some small Solder braid.

 

Thread split from:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/l...

 

JGM - Moderator

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Last Edited: Fri. Dec 16, 2016 - 06:56 PM
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Some SMD packages are actually quite easy to solder. SOT23-3 is easiest, by far, because the pins are far apart. Other SOT23 are pretty easy, also. I tin one pad, then solder the pin to that pad to keep it from moving around, then solder the remaining ones. Don't pre-tin any of the other pads, just the first one. 

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Thu. Dec 15, 2016 - 08:20 PM
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A Wise Freak gave me a great tip on soldering SOIC and TQFP packages.

 

1)Tack two pins on opposite sides to the board.

 

2) Then run a 'bead' of solder across all the pins on one side, then do this for the other side(s)

 

3) go back to the first side and use solder wick and your iron to 'soak up' the solder - HINT: you will not get it all and thats ok.

 

4) repeat step 3 for all the other side(s)

 

5) inspect for solder shorts.  If done properly you should not have any.  the solder left behind is more than enough to make a good connection.

 

I have been doing this for a year or two now and I mo longer worry about ordering SMD parts.  After some practice it can be tough to tell a machine soldered part from this technique.

 

YMMV

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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And if you don't have a soldering iron, you can buy a USB soldering iron for less than $5

This device is much better than it seems, I have one. Check out the youtube reviews. Sure, it has low thermal mass, but for many SMD packages it doesn't matter anyway.

 

It's supposed to be 8W, so it will draw 1.6 A from the USB, obviously you will not connect it to a PC USB port, but to a charger that can handle the current. Actually, I use it with 2 chargers: one can handle the full power, but the iron overeats sometimes; the other can only supply 1A so the voltage drops a bit but the temperature is milder.

 

Here is some SMD I soldered to an adapter (LQFP with 0.5mm pitch) even managed to put decoupling caps, so don't be afraid of SMDs (well, the ones with leads, anyway). Just follow the soldering tips of previous posts, and use liberal amounts of flux.

 

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LightningWalrus wrote:

Howdy folks !

 

Is there any temperature sensor like LM75 but in a DIP package ? I came to a project in my book which teaches about I2C protocol and the project requires LM75 temperature sensor. All the LM75s i found were in SMD package and i don't have a soldering iron to solder it onto some interface board. Or is there something else that teaches about I2C protocol with another device which is easy to plug onto breadboard ?

 

 

Another DIP I2C device easily available is the DS1307 clock chip. https://www.maximintegrated.com/...

 

Yes you would need a 32KHz crystal but they are also easily available. The DS1307 also has 64 bytes of storage, so you could learn about reading and writing via I2C.

 

If you were around the corner I would give you a few to "play with."

 

Best of luck.

 

Ross

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Maybe it's time to get a soldering iron ? The easiest way to get one would be conrad.com for me. I would like to buy something that is not the cheapest but not the most expensive either. Something that would do its job well and work for quite some time. And don't go rusty. Thank you.

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Hi Walrus,

EEVblog just did a blog about setting up a hobby electronics lab for about usd300.

For soldering he advised a  Hakko ripoff and his arguments seemed sound & logical.

 

About temperature sensors:

Some years ago I bought a bag of MCP9701 in TO-92 housings.

They're  USD 0.25 from Futurlec.

These TO-92's are more easily clamped to something physical compared to smd.

 

A simple hack that "Velleman" (manufacturer of electronics kits) uses in  "VM100" ( 200W audio amplifier) is to dril a hole in (not through) a heatsink, put in a TO92 sensor with some thermal paste and then solder the wires of the sensor to the pcb. Stiffness of the wires is enough to keep it in the hole.

Sensor is in the top right in the picture from:

http://www.velleman.eu/products/...

 

 

Doing magic with a USD 7 Logic Analyser: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment/2421756#comment-2421756

Bunch of old projects with AVR's: http://www.hoevendesign.com

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Paulvdh wrote:

Hi Walrus,

EEVblog just did a blog about setting up a hobby electronics lab for about usd300.

For soldering he advised a  Hakko ripoff and his arguments seemed sound & logical.

 

About temperature sensors:

Some years ago I bought a bag of MCP9701 in TO-92 housings.

They're  USD 0.25 from Futurlec.

These TO-92's are more easily clamped to something physical compared to smd.

 

A simple hack that "Velleman" (manufacturer of electronics kits) uses in  "VM100" ( 200W audio amplifier) is to dril a hole in (not through) a heatsink, put in a TO92 sensor with some thermal paste and then solder the wires of the sensor to the pcb. Stiffness of the wires is enough to keep it in the hole.

Sensor is in the top right in the picture from:

http://www.velleman.eu/products/...

 

 

 

Thanks for the hint ! I wonder if it would be wise to buy a good soldering station like Weller WHS40 ? This one would last for quite a while.

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I still have the Weller I purchased in the 70's, it may still have the original tip (PTA7, or PTB7).   I have also used Hakko's, but the one I'm using now I picked up off Ebay has both an iron and hot air, and cost less then either the Weller or Hakko.    About $50 US.  

Like this one:

  http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-in-1-S...

 

 

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ki0bk wrote:

I still have the Weller I purchased in the 70's, it may still have the original tip (PTA7, or PTB7).   I have also used Hakko's, but the one I'm using now I picked up off Ebay has both an iron and hot air, and cost less then either the Weller or Hakko.    About $50 US.  

Like this one:

  http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-in-1-S...

 

 

 

Does your Weller still work ?

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LightningWalrus wrote:
Does your Weller still work ?

Mine just died after over 20 years of reliable service.  Many of us here have units even older.

 

Not sure what I am going to purchase next

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Yes it does!

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274
get $5 free gold/silver https://www.onegold.com/join/713...

 

 

 

 

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I've noticed how this topic derailed from discussing the LM75 to discussing a soldering iron.
 

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TBD

- John

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 16, 2016 - 07:31 PM
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LightningWalrus wrote:
I've noticed how this topic derailed from discussing the LM75 to discussing a soldering iron.

By your own hand:

LightningWalrus wrote:
All the LM75s i found were in SMD package and i don't have a soldering iron to solder it onto some interface board.

 

What many are trying to tell you is not to shy away from a part because of the package...

 

For breadboarding I used these quite extensively in the past:

 

http://www.proto-advantage.com/s...

 

A little pricey, but they work great and come with the pins you need. 

 

As far as getting back on topic, you could also look at the LM34

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink...

 

and LM35

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink...

 

Which come in TO-92 packages and work well in a breadboard.

 

Then there is Maxim

https://www.maximintegrated.com/...

 

https://www.maximintegrated.com/...

 

https://www.maximintegrated.com/...

 

https://www.maximintegrated.com/...

 

I have used the DS1621 and it works well.  Used the LM34 and LM 35 as well.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
What many are trying to tell you is not to shy away from a part because of the package...
I don't "shy away" from a SMD package. Using it without soldering it to an adapter would be quite a tedious task.

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Ok, hope the links I provided help your situation at least.

 

Cheers,

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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El Tangas wrote:

And if you don't have a soldering iron, you can buy a USB soldering iron for less than $5

This device is much better than it seems, I have one. Check out the youtube reviews. Sure, it has low thermal mass, but for many SMD packages it doesn't matter anyway.

 

It's supposed to be 8W, so it will draw 1.6 A from the USB, obviously you will not connect it to a PC USB port, but to a charger that can handle the current. Actually, I use it with 2 chargers: one can handle the full power, but the iron overeats sometimes; the other can only supply 1A so the voltage drops a bit but the temperature is milder.

 

Here is some SMD I soldered to an adapter (LQFP with 0.5mm pitch) even managed to put decoupling caps, so don't be afraid of SMDs (well, the ones with leads, anyway). Just follow the soldering tips of previous posts, and use liberal amounts of flux.

 

 

I would NEVER have gotten that capacitor on there right.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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For soldering teeny tiny parts like that smd cap, a pen knife or even a sewing needle can be handy to hold the part in place while applying or reflowing the solder.

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

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