Isolator cover on PCB ?

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Guys,

What's the name of isolator cover on PCB ?
the green color paint ?
Can I buy it from bunning ?
Can it resist heat ?
I can see it as an isolator paint with green /blue /red color for PCB ...
Where can I buy it ?

Thanks for the info mates

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I gather you're referring to the soldermask. I doubt Bunnings ( home depot equiv) would sell a specialised epoxy coating like this. Is it heat resistant? Of course - how else would you solder a pcb?
Where can you buy it? It would be cheaper to have your pcbs manufactured with the soldermask already done methinks.

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bianchi77 wrote:
Guys,

What's the name of isolator cover on PCB ?
the green color paint ?
Can I buy it from bunning ?
Can it resist heat ?
I can see it as an isolator paint with green /blue /red color for PCB ...
Where can I buy it ?

Thanks for the info mates


As Kartman wrote, it is the soldermask.

If you are looking for a spray-on/brush-on insulator for PCBs, consider conformal coatings which come in both spay and liquid. They are designed to insulate and protect the PCB after components are attached.

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Kartman wrote:
I gather you're referring to the soldermask. I doubt Bunnings ( home depot equiv) would sell a specialised epoxy coating like this. Is it heat resistant? Of course - how else would you solder a pcb?
Where can you buy it? It would be cheaper to have your pcbs manufactured with the soldermask already done methinks.

Yea, it's cheaper, only I'm thinking if I want to do a fast prototyping, I need the PCB quickly before my idea is forgotten because of waiting for PCB arrived, and I forgot already and missed some files I need...hehehe

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Is there any cheaper way to do it ? with transparent paint who can stand up to 200 or 300 degree celcius ? a lot of transparent paint out there, may be I can use one for covering the track, don't have to be perfect, but enough for prototyping

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bianchi77 wrote:
Is there any cheaper way to do it ? with transparent paint who can stand up to 200 or 300 degree celcius ? a lot of transparent paint out there, may be I can use one for covering the track, don't have to be perfect, but enough for prototyping

If you apply the "paint" (solder mask) before soldering the parts - which is whole point of a solder mask - you would need to mask off the solder pads and SMD lands so that they would not be covered. How are you planning to to that?

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There is "paint on solder mask". I have some in the form of a pen. Got it from one of the major industrial electronic distributors or on-line, Several years ago, so I don't remember the details. But, I still have it.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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http://au.element14.com/jsp/leve...

Incidently, Google shows this link above the link to this question.

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First, what do you want to do with it exactly? It's already been said that for insulation, what you want is conformal coating, and you apply it AFTER soldering. With that said, if you will solder by hand, you could mask solder points with masking tape strips, and apply a silicone based conformal coating. It can usually resist up to about 200C, probably more if its momentary. If you will solder in an oven, or through solder bath, then you should really just get the board professionally done.

Something like this should work... Make sure to read the technical data, this is NOT paint.

Also, conformal coating is kind of final. Make sure to mask any areas that might need rework, or you will also have to buy very expensive solvent to remove the conformal coating, which is resistant to traditional solvents once cured.

http://www.electrolube.com/docs/...

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Solder mask is not considered an electrical insulator when designing for electrical isolation requirements.

It all starts with a mental vision.

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Chuck99 wrote:
bianchi77 wrote:
Is there any cheaper way to do it ? with transparent paint who can stand up to 200 or 300 degree celcius ? a lot of transparent paint out there, may be I can use one for covering the track, don't have to be perfect, but enough for prototyping

If you apply the "paint" (solder mask) before soldering the parts - which is whole point of a solder mask - you would need to mask off the solder pads and SMD lands so that they would not be covered. How are you planning to to that?

I can put permanent ink into the pad while I'm putting the "paint" and after the paint is drying, just clean up the permanent ink from the pad....simple

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Solder mask is typically a two part epoxy compound.
It can be sprayed on, flow coated or screen printed.

It can also be rolled on but may leave a textured surface.

It is photo sensitive and is typically applied wet,allowed to cure in an oven for say 8 to 10 min and is then when tack dry exposed under a photo too; ( film) .
After exposure it is developed in an alkaline solution, rinsed, dried off and finally baked to become the solder mask we expect it to be.

There are dry film variants which are applied by applying heat and pressure ( usually hot rollers ) followed by photographic process.

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For home made, one off stuff, bare copper is fairly easy to solder and quite durable.

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There is also this stuff on ebay.

http://goo.gl/avwHcL

But you need to expose it to UV through a mask. Seems like a lot of extra work for something that is going to be mostly cosmetic.

I just stick to the bare copper on my prototypes.

-carl

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Hello KitCarlson; I agree with you 100%, but I have been looking for a text from IPC, UL or any other official entity that would state what you say; "Solder mask is not considered an electrical insulator when designing for electrical isolation requirements. " or it is not recommended, etc. Do you know where I can find this?   Thanks and have a good day

Arturosbaja

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I think you might find by googling, or in agency approval specs UL, IEC.

Here is about HV pcb fabrication, it suggests single layer solder mask has pores.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.magazines007.com/pdf/High-Voltage-PCDesign.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwiM_dDvod_OAhVBHx4KHVMeDNEQFggyMAc&usg=AFQjCNFw-A4hOD9Fmhb1nwa37fH3Jedl6w&sig2=5yAiL78ipsgfZ0Eov0UhCw

It all starts with a mental vision.

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 26, 2016 - 03:11 PM
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KitCarlson wrote:
Here is about HV pcb fabrication, ir suggest single layer solder mask has pores.

Very nice on-topic link, with opinions/facts from someone with experience.

 

But no explicit UL or other certification mention with respect to solder mask.

 

 

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I did not know, I worked closely with a power supply designer, that also worked the agency approvals. I must have infered that it was for agency approvals. He would say it counted as zero for insulation. That made sense.

We typically used milled gaps in pcb, to provide spacing and avoid pollution layer on pcb.

It all starts with a mental vision.

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I have used a green paint pen(enamel or lacquer based IIRC )  I got it from the hobby store, but in a pinch I have used green finger nail polish to do touch up!   

 

smiley

 

 

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Here is a link to one of the big companies that make solder mask....

 

https://www.chemtronics.com/c-25...

 

Turns out you can purchase the material in small quantities online for reasonable prices

 

Jim

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Yah know, we really don't know what OP or the later responder wants/needs to do.

 

What voltage levels are of concern?  "Normal" PC board levels, from a 5V power source?  From a 24VDC power source?  From 24VAC power source?  Mains?  3-phase motor drive?

 

Generally we coat our production board with liquid HumiSeal.  Our board houses sometimes use a silicone-like conformal coating.  The application is after assembly and is mainly to protect the finished board from moisture and dirt.  Not for e.g. mains safety.

 

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.