What's the speed of a cd player's motor

Go To Last Post
14 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

HI,
I found a motor : rf-310T-11400, I try to search it in google, and found it may be used for cd play.

However, what's the speed of a cd player?

Thanks

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Anything between 1x for a really old player and 52x (or more for a new drive). So what rpm is 1x? Well, unlike old vinyl disk players that played the record with a constant rotational speed, CD players play audio CDs with constant linear speed. (Another way to look at it is that old vinyl records crammed more info per track length into the inner tracks than the outer tracks. CDs have a constant amount of data per a certain length of track). Thus the CD disk spins faster for tracks near the center.

Conclusion: There is no specific fugire to quote for the "speed of a CD player".

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

HI,
The motor work at the 5.9V, I think this may be the safe "max speed", then Is there any data about this "max speed"?

Thanks.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

bigreat wrote:
However, what's the speed of a cd player?

Depends how fast you throw it.

JohanEkdahl wrote:
Conclusion: There is no specific fugire to quote for the "speed of a CD player".

No, but the upper and lower rpm limits can be determined or maybe even the specs describe them.

But seriously, yes, the motor speed varies depending on the played position. Music CDs are played with constant linear velocity (CLV), so when the first (innermost) track is played, the motor rotates faster and when the last (outermost) track is played the motor rotates slower. This is to get constant data rate. That data rate is achieved when rotating between 500 and 200 rpm.

But then again, you can also read yourself here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_disc

- Jani

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Ok, I knew it.
Thanks!!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

You should look around on airplane modeling forums, those guys love CD motors. They use them as they are or modified, a lot of info and step-by-step "tutorials" can be found there. I can't think of any particular place right now, but it must not be hard to find.

The Dark Boxes are coming.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

HI,
Thanks, I'm searching it.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I found one
http://www.rcgroups.com/
however, it seems that them more like to use CD-ROM motors not CD player's

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

They are avrers too.

Attachment(s): 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

This is my motor, it not a CD-ROM motor, it seems a constant-speed motor.

Attachment(s): 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That looks like a cassette capstan motor to me. I think they have a centrifugal speed switch/governor... when you try to make it faster by turning up the volts on the ps, it just keeps running at 2800rpm or whatever speed the tape is supposed to run at.

That avr 3 phase drive with 3 half bridges is pretty neat! I hear they are getting over 10K rpms with those things in ducted fan 'jets'

Imagecraft compiler user

Last Edited: Wed. Jul 19, 2006 - 01:26 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I'm an aero modeller who often disects CD ROM motors then uprates the magnets to something like N45s or N48s and rewinds the coils. The bottom line is that you can make a motor out of the bits for whatever perfomance you like. At the end of the day it's your brushless ESC that is going to determine how fast it spins (planes are much easier to fly with proportional motor control rather than on/off at a fixed speed!). rcgroups.com is undoubtedly the best resource on the internet for electric model aircraft but don't forget to stop in at www.gobrushless.com if you want the full skinny on making your own motors from CD parts (in fact they supply "standard" parts so you don't have to experiment with 10 different old CD motors to find a "good one".

Cliff

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Speaking of which.. I have a standard floorstanding fan, which is of course lacking leds on its wings and I'd love to fix that little design flaw. I've been thinking about two possibilities to provide electricity to the rotating part. Simpliest one, as it seems, is to attach a brush motor to the rotor and fix its rotor to the exterior cover. This will make a generator that can be used to power the leds. Another idea is of course mount the windings on the fan rotor itself and somehow put magnets very close to the windings, maybe on some spikes.. Maybe someone did similar things before, has experience to share? Maybe a brushless cd motor can be somehow converted for this purpose? I just guess that they can endure more abuse, but hardly usable as generators without modifications.

The Dark Boxes are coming.