Help for H/W basics

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Hello FREAKS,

 

I am new to embedded systems. I can do embedded C coding but my h/w knowledge is very poor. Honestly speaking, I really struggle with h/w basics. There are many books available for basic h/w. Also plenty of videos on youtube. But it confuses me to select/follow any particular single source to make my basics strong.

 

Is there any book or video link that will help me make my basics strong? 

 

Any help is truly appreciated.

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Very useful site on basic electronics: http://electronicsclub.info/

 

In particular, look at the 'Components' section for an introduction to how each of the common electronic components - resistors, LEDs, transistors, etc - works, and how to use them.

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Thanks, I will give it try. Better to start with working of each component.

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I wonder whatever happened to college or university courses. surprise

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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js wrote:

I wonder whatever happened to college or university courses. surprise

I learned most of the basic electronic before college from magazines like Popular Electronics, Byte and later, Circuit Cellar. I also remember how difficult it was just to get a TTL data book, or even, (and I can say this now) a Microchip databook that was about 2" thick. Times have changed.

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I was the alpha male in the EE101 labs in 70 and 71. I knew the resistor color code. Those were the heydays of build your own dynaco stereo amp, heathkits.

 

Imagecraft compiler user

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Someguy22 wrote:
 I also remember how difficult it was just to get a TTL data book, or even, (and I can say this now) a Microchip databook that was about 2" thick. Times have changed.

Indeed - and the kids o' today wonder why we give them a "hard time" (sic) about googling and downloading datasheets ...

 

Which, of course, is the cue for ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Sully give ME a hard time about googling things 

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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As a student, I studied IC data books.   Signetics had an entry for a Write-Only Memory chip.  I puzzled for a long time what possible use that this chip could have.  It turned out that this entry was a well-known practical joke and a parody of data sheets that was inside a real data book with all the other ICs.

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Yeah, those WOMs were as popular as the Read Once, Write Many RAMs.

David (aka frog_jr)

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Practical Electronics for Inventors by Paul Scherz is a very good book for beginners and reference for the rest.

Happy Trails,

Mike

JaxCoder.com

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Electronic circuits IS taught in most EE programs. However, it tends to be pretty theoretical, omitting things like transistor breakdown, maximum current limits, and such. These classes also tend to omit complex circuits like switch-mode power supplies. The schools I know rely on internships, senior projects, and such to teach the real hands-on stuff. I highly recommend "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz and Hill. It is getting a bit dated and it is more than a bit expensive, even used. But, for someone just cutting their teeth in the field, it is nearly worth its weight in gold.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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ka7ehk wrote:
It is getting a bit dated and it is more than a bit expensive, even used.
The student manual is dated; that may have been replaced this year with its companion book "Learning the Art of Electronics".

The popular distributors will have AofE at a significantly less price than the publisher; IIRC, my copy (corrected third edition, 2015) was via Amazon.

Cambridge University Press logo

Cambridge University Press

Electronics for physicists

http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/physics/electronics-physicists/

Some EE parts of engineering colleges will have two circuits courses; theory for EE students, practical for others (though might share the lab exercises).

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller