Split from: Help! Vibration sensors!

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Hi freaks..!!! I am using Atmega 16, anybody tell which Vibration Sensor module(either piezo eletric or Inductive method) is suitable for atmega 16 and show me which method is more reliable for future development project...

Last Edited: Wed. May 25, 2016 - 08:54 AM
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most accelerometers are capacitive these days. What vibration do you want to measure?

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nivash wrote:

Hi freaks..!!! I am using Atmega 16, anybody tell which Vibration Sensor module(either piezo eletric or Inductive method) is suitable for atmega 16 and show me which method is more reliable for future development project...

Google will get you direct answers, rather than posting utterly vague questions with no information about your application. The ability to do a search using google is the most important skill anyone learning electronics will need. 

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Hey, i am new for atmega IC's and I'm doing some basic level projects...My application is a theft protection system, and i want to implement the vibration sensor for alert the user while stranger 'll break the locker or any specific stuffs. Please suggest me any sensors available in market to fullfil my application.

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Maybe just some tilt switches like these.

 

http://www.miniinthebox.com/laco...

 

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Most "vibration" sensors have a frequency response from 100Hz (give or take a fair amount) to a few kiloHertz (again, give or take). They are designed to sense vibration of engines, machinery, vehicles, and such. Vibration sensors are typically 1 axis of sensing. Both piezo and inductive require significant signal processing to make them suitable for microcontroller input. These are really specialized accelerometers.

 

"Accelerometers" of the integrated type typically  work from a few hundred Hertz down to DC (that is, they WILL measure gravity, and thus tilt). Accelerometers come in 1, 2, and 3 axis versions. These come in analog and digital types. Analog requires (typically) one or more ADCs and often have poorer sensitivity than the digital ones; sensitivity is often limited by the number of ADC bits. Analog accelerometers often have a faster response speed than the digital ones. Digital ones have all of the ADC conversion built in and require SPI or I2C for interfacing. Many of the digital ones come with transient detection; these will sense an acceleration "anomaly" event and set a flag (and maybe an MCU interrupt) without any MCU intervention except for initialization. These features are often used for vehicle crash detection (eg - airbags) and drop detection (for your smartphone or laptop). 

 

Hope this helps

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Wed. May 25, 2016 - 04:53 PM