Hot Dog! A cool LED circuit to try.

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I always suspected that hot dogs did not contain just meat...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Too bad I'm not home this week, or might actually give it a try.

 

Although the photo might have been rigged, the underlying concept is sound.

 

First estimate say about 75 V across the hot dog would do the trick.

 

Sizzle, sizzle . . . and there was light!

 

JC

 

 

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I can remember cooking a hot dog in class like this, but I have my doubts about the LED's.

 

On the other side though, do they glow based on how well done the dog is?

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Put a DC voltage across the dog.

 

That means there is a voltage gradient from one end tot he other, ie X volts on the left end, 0 V on the right end.

 

Say the LED electrodes are 1/8" apart, and you want 1.5 V across the LED's two electrodes.

 

Say the hot dog is 6 inches long.

 

Assume the voltage gradient is uniform, (a reasonable assumption except along the skin and at the ends of the hot dog).

 

Assume there are 48 x 1/8" segments, and 1.5 V / segment, giving about 75 V to light up the LEDs,

 

This is the same concept as lighting a fluorescent tube bulb in the voltage field emitted by a Tesla coil.

 

JC

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Well if it is powered from DC maybe,

But from the picture generally the Brown, and Blue wires generally mean the power is coming from a mains line(110, 220).

 

I am tempted to try this tomorrow at lunchtime.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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A hot dog is relavatistic, so the laws of thermodynamics do not apply!

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I'd guess that the skin effect (in both senses) does not come into play (much) here, so it is going to be bulk resistance. The voltage will be more or less uniformly distributed between the tips of the forks until that is disturbed by the current flow of the LEDs. 

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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How very enlightening...

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Maybe #fake

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valusoft wrote:
I always suspected that hot dogs did not contain just meat...

 

True story: Maaaany years ago (think late 1980s) I held Excel courses. At one time I had only two guys as participants, both working at a subsidiary to a slaughters company (in lack of the correct term, big company, killing animals and cutting them up, packing for consumption in your everyday supermarket). They where some of the most hilariously funny people I have met. One day of constant laughing while learning Excel.

 

At one point I asked them what the subsidiary company was doing..

 


"We take care of all the stuff from the butchers that can not be packaged as a "raw meat" product. Bones, skin, assorted goo, you name it. We have this big machine with big funnel on the top. At the bottom are several "outlets" where separated basic stuff comes out. Plasma, bone meal, other goo.."

 

"So, what do you do with that?" I asked.

 

"We transport it to a factory we have in another city [500 km away]. In that factory we have a machine with a lot of funnels at the top. Into those we pour the plasma, bone meal, other goo.. And out the bottom comes hot dogs!"


 

As I said, this was in the 1980s. I'm sure things have changed. I still don't eat hot-dogs.

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Ditto...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Johan,

 

Nothing has changed.    You get what you pay for.

 

Traditional butchers will make sausages from real meat that is cut from the "less popular" parts of the carcase.

 

Industrialised factories will make sausages from anything that is cheap.   e.g. MRM (mechanically recovered meat) and other goo.

 

The finer the texture of the finished product,   the less obvious the "ingredients".    I believe that "Hot Dogs" are almost completely devoid of texture.

 

Mind you,   I am sure that they can reconstitute anything if there is money to be made.

I always understood that you worked in the Food business.    So you are well aware of some of the processes.

 

Yes,   I am very fond of sausages.   Both regular British "Bangers" and dry cured Salami.   If you can identify the meat fibres,  it probably is real meat.    (and I will be eating sausages for tea this evening)

 

David.

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David, totally agree .. except for what business I'm in ;-).

 

Still, I'm all for a good meal and a "real sausage" is a fine treat!

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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We used to joke about the floor sweepings going into sausages including the sawdust that traditional butcher shops used to have on their floors. I have very clear memories of the sawdust. Never did understand why it was on the customer's side of the counter though.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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JohanEkdahl wrote:

...Bones, skin, assorted goo, you name it...

Yummy!

Loaded with nutritious material.cheeky

JohanEkdahl wrote:

...

I still don't eat hot-dogs.

You maybe but as we can see there are big fans of these stuff(HotDog, bulgarian sausages, bla bla bla) in the world. still you think it's gross!?

 

Humph! I hate of some beans like lentil.

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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Rohalamin wrote:
Humph! I hate of some beans like lentil.

Mmmmmm.. Beans! :-)

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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BAH!
You do not know what a "real" hot dog it until you have a world famous NYC 'dirty water dog' with mustard, onions-n-sauce, sauerkraut, and chili(when available) on top. Served by one of the finest NYC street chefs.

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

Last Edited: Sun. Jan 17, 2016 - 01:49 PM
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it reminds me of how we dug earthworms up when I was a boy

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jgmdesign wrote:

BAH!
You do not know what a "real" hot dog it until you have a world famous NYC 'dirty water dog' with mustard, onions-n-sauce, sauerkraut, and chili(when available) on top. Served by one of the finest NYC street chefs.

Jim

GeartZZ!

How can I give you 100 star!?wink

Jim, shouldn't you say:

jgmdesign wrote:

BAH!
You do not know what a "real" hot dog IS until you ...

instead of:

jgmdesign wrote:

BAH!
You do not know what a "real" hot dog it until you ...

?

Pardon me for my insolence.

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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Yes, should have been "is", but it was a simple typo, (typing mistake). Depending on the device one is using it might have "autocorrected" the message while Jim was typing, often inserting the mistake.

JC

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Well, since this thread went off the electronics path, click HERE.

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@Rohalamin

As Doc pointed out you are indeed correct in correcting my typo.  I was on my Android and the thing makes corrections and I am not always looking at things.  GOOD CATCH!

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Someguy22 wrote:

Well, since this thread went off the electronics path, click HERE.

I'm out of control for now!

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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Johan, my next visit to Stockholm I am looking for two things. Varm Korv anywhere and Kebab at hotorget. Ahh...

 

Please do not tell me what the kebab holds...

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Best hotdogs I've ever had are in the Cincinnati, OH (CVG) airport. I don't know what addictive drug they are putting in their cheese coneys, but I fly through CVG just to stop and eat a few. I'm sure I don't want to know what's in the actual hotdog though.

 

 

Image result for cincinnati cheese coney

 

Greg

 

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jaydhall wrote:

Johan, my next visit to Stockholm I am looking for two things. Varm Korv anywhere and Kebab at hotorget. Ahh...

 

Please do not tell me what the kebab holds...

Wait a second!

You are saying that we can find Kebab in Stockholm?

I should take a trip to Stockholm in the future! I really must visit it! I'm going to fall in love with Stockholm.kiss

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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Wait a second!

You are saying that we can find Kebab in Stockholm?

YOu can get a kebab just about anywhere.  I can get them from the same vendor that I get a dirty water dog from.

 

Next time I am in NYC I will have to take a few pics for you of some of the street carts.

 

Jim

 

 

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Rohalamin wrote:
You are saying that we can find Kebab in Stockholm?

As Jim said, you can get Kebab most everywhere in the world. Sweden has several hundred thousand immigrants from the part of the world from where kebab emanates. In most any medium size village and up (say, a few thousand inhabitants and up) there is at least one combined Pizza+Falafel+Kebab restaurant or take-away. They most often also serve Hamburgers of some kind, fried fish fillet and similar.

 

IMO, there are few things that beats really good Falafel! Also IMO, there are few more boring meals than a really bad Falafel..

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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jgmdesign wrote:

YOu can get a kebab just about anywhere.  I can get them from the same vendor that I get a dirty water dog from.

 

Next time I am in NYC I will have to take a few pics for you of some of the street carts.

Thanks.

Do it please and show us.
smiley

JohanEkdahl wrote:

As Jim said, you can get Kebab most everywhere in the world. Sweden has several hundred thousand immigrants from the part of the world from where kebab emanates. In most any medium size village and up (say, a few thousand inhabitants and up) there is at least one combined Pizza+Falafel+Kebab restaurant or take-away. They most often also serve Hamburgers of some kind, fried fish fillet and similar...

Do you know we Iranian is the best Kebab maker in the world?

JohanEkdahl wrote:
...IMO, there are few things that beats really good Falafel! Also IMO, there are few more boring meals than a really bad Falafel..

I badly Agree! and also it's soooo important to fresh and hot eat it.

I don't like Falafel while it's a southern food(Bushehr, Bandar-abas,...) in Iran and many Iranian like it though.

Also better to say it's a middle-eastern food.

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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I love shawarma, especially with a chilli sauce.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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We all go to Habib to get a kebab!

http://www.sbs.com.au/programs/kebabs-unwrapped/watch/kebab-kings
I'm not sure if this works outside of Australia.

Last Edited: Mon. Jan 18, 2016 - 11:26 PM
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valusoft wrote:

I love shawarma, especially with a chilli sauce.

We Iranian call it Turkish Kebab.

"One's value is inherent; money is not inherent"

 

Chuck, you are in my heart!

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It is called shawarma in Jeddah. cheeky

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I'll have a Ted's wit' da' werks and a large loganberry:) (Buffalo NY)

 

Just some guy