programmer for mac os?

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Hi! I´m totally new to avr micros, and I wonder if there is any programming software for mac os?

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Yup, avrdude can be used from the Mac OS. In fact in any Linux/Unix like operating system you basically have a choice of one toolset and that is the avr-gcc tools. There's a whole forum here dedicated to their support and one of the sticky threads at the top will give you an oidea of how to get started on an *nix type of operating system.

Cliff

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I am a Mac user and hear my advice: you're ten times faster set-up if you just use parallels (most recent build) and AVR Studio 4.13 or newer with WinXP than installing the toolchain on native OS X and doing all by hand. Sure, Terminal is great, I use it all of the time for repeating tasks. But still I love the convenience of one-button-uploading everything to the AVR.

Edit: I guess you can also use Boot Camp with WinXP if you have an Intel-based Mac. Should work even better because there is no bad USB implementation problem Parallels sometimes has.

Markus

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Or you can use OSX AVR.

http://www.digithink.com/OSX-AVR...

Regards,
Steve A.

The Board helps those that help themselves.

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Here is a step-by-step tutorial on how to install OSX AVR, including setting up the PATH and installing "make" (via XCode)

http://www.ladyada.net/library/a...

Interesting projects: www.ladyada.net Unique kits: www.adafruit.com

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If a MAC user only wanted to do assembly programming, what would you install besides AVRDude??

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dksmall wrote:
If a MAC user only wanted to do assembly programming, what would you install besides AVRDude??

Maybe AVRA?

http://avra.sourceforge.net/

(rather ironically you are going to need a native C compiler to build the cross assembler ;) )

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I have been working with AVR devices for more than a decade.

 

But new to XCODE and MAC. Now I am using XCODE(latest released version). No other software is installed.

 

What is the best way to get started now(Aug 2015)?

 

ATMEL--Heart Beat
Nothing Impossible

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I just Googled avr gcc osx a there seems to be some good hits.
Note - i use a mac but my avr stuff is done under a windows vm

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TO AVRGURU:

 

I am assuming that your intent is to use the Xcode IDE to develop AVR applications. Keep in mind, Xcode is tailor made for building OS-X / IOS code on X-86 and ARM architectures. Yes, Xcode 'can be' configured for other uses... but it's not ideal.

 

You will need two additional things, regardless...  a tool-chain obviously, and an 'AVR Project Template'. The template basically tells Xcode what tool chain to use. Most available templates are pretty simplistic, though X-AVR looks promising right now (https://jawher.me/2014/03/21/usi...). 

 

I say 'right now,' because when the next release of Xcode arrives, all your carefully fine tuned templates and scripts and work-arounds will suddenly become useless crud.

 

That's why I stick to simple text editors, Makefiles and the command line. Never has let me down.

 

Last Edited: Sat. Aug 29, 2015 - 08:41 PM
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To chrillz86:

 

Though many would excoriate me for saying this, the Arduino system is very good for 'getting your feet wet'. Use it to get started... but always keep in mind that it 'imposes' as much as it 'provides'. 

 

MacOS always seems to be left out of the main loop, but there certainly ARE avr programming tools available for it. Currently my main development is being done with  avr-gcc 4.9.3, AVR-Libc 1.8.1, supported by binutils 2.25 and avrdude 6.1. This is the latest (working) combination of tools in release, and running on MacOS 10.10.5 

 

If you need some pointers just PM me.

 

 

 

 

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Having an Atmel ICE programmer/debugger can be a productivity booster. As far as I know debugging is only possible using Atmel Studio. On OS X I run Windows 7 in a VM (Fusion). Works for me.