Crosswork for AVR experience

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Hi

I have youst finished an evaluating of CrossWorks (http://www.rowley.co.uk/avr/) for AVR c-compiler as an competitor for gcc (which I pr. to day use for private projects), IAR (which I use almost daily at work), Codevision (Which I used befor gcc (demo version)) and ImageCraft (which my work has used for a couple of times, since it was wanted by our customer).

My conclusion is that for 495£ this is an potential good competitor for IAR compiler and the others. It is also one of the developers intention to meet the IAR marked. The project GUI is for me very intuitive and logic and it is easy to manipulate project settings. The compiler is fast and optimation logarithms ar effective. One ported project for Attiny2313 ended up on 1786bytes opose to 2020 for GCC (with best achieved size optimation) and the program runned faster, and then i didn't enable all or best optimation levels.

But it could have been so much more if they youst wanted to implement a few things. First and for me, worst, is that there is only suport for propritary debug formats which is not supported by AVR studio, i.e. I am stuck whit their Crosswork to emulate and also for simulating my projects and the simulator GUI is lacking many features like the io view in avr studio. In crossworks everything is variables and port registers are viewed and altered by adding them to the watch window, i.e. you must deal with hex or dec value of the registers an offcourse, you do not see any bit names for a particular register. Next is that there is no support for inline assembley, thats bad. Next is that the c-compiler only suports V2 and V2E architecture i.e. at90s2313 which I still have a couple of in my basket is only supported by using assembley. Thats no big deal since attiny and all megas is supported, including the new 256KB devices. (Can anynone point to some recourse explaining the differences of the v0, v1, v1e, v2, v2e and v3 architecture?). Other things to mention is the output format which also is propritary, but you can select additional output formats including intel-hex (but you cant deselect the propritary format).

Does any of you have experience with Crossworks, please share them with me. It is an interesting competitor but, as I explained for the Crosswork team, it is not interesting enough for me, yet.

Regards
Z

---
By the way, when speaking of other c-compilers. Has anyone of you ever tried the SPJ c-compiler for avr?

Regards
Vidar (Z)

----------------------------------------------------------

"The fool wonders, the wise man asks"

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I think that since you have personally used all the major avr c compilers, you have just won the prize as the the official avr freaks c compiler consultant. We are all awaiting your review of the crossworks and spj compilers!

Imagecraft compiler user

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Youst got yet another response from Crosswork according to the debugger solution. I share it with you since it is interesting news aboute the compiler...

Quote:
During the development of CrossWorks for AVR, Atmel knew that COFF support in AVR Studio was badly broken (it supported a very limited, fixed set of sections) and the replacement ELF/Dwarf output wasn't finished so we were in a difficult position.

Hopefully the next version will include an ELF/DWARF output option to be compatible with AVR Studio.

--
Paul Curtis, Rowley Associates Ltd http://www.rowley.co.uk
CrossWorks for MSP430, ARM, AVR and now MAXQ processors

Hopefully that won't take to long.

Regards
Vidar (Z)

----------------------------------------------------------

"The fool wonders, the wise man asks"

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Quote:

CrossWorks for MSP430, ARM, AVR and now MAXQ processors

Readers of this thread may be interested in the IAR vs. CrossWorks numbers on a selection of microcontroller platforms, including Mega8 AVR, that Maxim ran for its MAXQ benchmark:

http://www.maxim-ic.com/products...

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Hi,

I've used Crossworks for ARM for the last 2 years (at least) and it is an excellent tool. The ARM version uses the GCC compiler although I think all the other platforms supported use Rowley's own compiler, including the AVR version.

I haven't yet had any experience with their AVR version but, as I intend to migrate our AVR development to it as soon as I have the time, I'm also interested in how people are getting on with it. From what I have read (including the Maxim document) their compilers are very well regarded.

What I do have experience of is Rowley's customer support which is second to none, absolutely first class!! Had they not helped us get some working code going on our hardware (for free I might add) then we may well not be in business today.

Regards,

Tim.

------------------------------------------------------------------
www.activeflightsystems.com

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Well... at 495£ (865$) it is rather expensive for my taste... [clearing my throat :shock: ] Is there any chance to get a discount from Rowley's (non-profit version of Crossworks AVR C-compiler)?

Real men don't use backups, they post their stuff on a public ftp server and let the rest of the world make copies.

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Well, I may be poking my nose here, but this thread seems to be interesting. I am a migrator from MCS51, so I had the choice for deciding the tools first before starting any AVR project.

I came across almost all the compilers, IAR, Codevision, GCC and ofcourse Crossworks. One thing what migrating people expect is, there should be no big change between the working environment. Learning and working in a brand new architecture is worse than the worst, but we have to survive! Only IAR and Crossworks are multi-faceted compilers now, but they are on the higher side of $$$.

I had to sit finally on GCC, because 1)it is free, 2)it has a pool of self motivated users(a.k.a amaterus). But when it comes to professional development, Crossworks seems to be a good competitor.

For those who have worked in Keil compilers for MCS51 and ARM, now Keil has been 'bought' by ARM! When these sort of mergers happen, then the so called technical support for existing users may not be satisfying. I rely this would not happen.

Zainka, as Bobgardner has said, you have worked in almost all the contemporaty compilers. I found this topic to be interesting, so putting my little thoughts here.

Vignesh

Cheers,
Vignesh

If everything seems to be coming onto your way, then you are probably driving on a wrong lane..