Just great...fried my stk-500

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What a day :(

Stuck an atmega168 into the socket backwards like an idiot major.

Now it all lights up like normal..and plugging the 8515 that came
with it results in it's little program running OK and blinking the LEDs.

But no ability to program or read a chip...dang it..boohoo
90 bux flushed I guess :(

(there goes last weeks babysitting money)

Moral of this story..don't work in dim light and NEVER stick an
AVR in backwards.

This hobby gets more expensive every day....

Can anyone recommend a very simple programmer that I can
build and use on the serial port with AVR Studio to program chips
until a replacement stk500 from digikey can get here? I'm running XP
and have serial and lpt ports.

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Hey..anyone ever buy one of those usb avr programmers from TuxGraphics ??
did it take long to get it mailed to you?

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Perhaps you may be able to repair it. Since the lights light up, that means that the powersupply and such is ok; you may be able to get away with replacing the main 8535 MCU (I remember a guide being posted here showing the correct method for that). I'm gonna go check the schematic to see what may have been damaged. Have you ever soldered surface mount before?

Also, if you have an AVRISP you can plug that into the ISP6pin socket and use that as the programming system (the rest of the STK board works as the powersupply, convenience socket mounts, LEDs, resistors etc. Check what functions are still avaliable in AVRStudio; perhaps only a small amount of damage as been caused.

PS: If you don't want it anymore.... :D

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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I can still change setting like the voltage,freq..etc

Just cannot read the fuses,flash,eeprom
or write them either :(

Maybe I will just order the EasyAVR3 instead of getting
another stk-500...but I would miss the ability to do
hi-v programming.

There is NO WAY I would try to solder one of those surface mount chips..the whole stk-500 would end up as a blob of solder :)

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Get another STK would be my reccomedation, but I still think yours is fixable. The schematics show the ISP6PIN connector rigged directly to the 1200 and 8535, so if you've blow that you will need another 8535 (and possibly 1200). Can you monitor the MISO and MOSI pins (1 and 4 respectivly) with somthing to see if they're being driven? You can connect PORTB to the LEDs on the STK in ISP mode, and they will flash briefly when you do a read/write.

Were you using ISP or HV programming?

Edit: To those familiar with the STK500: I've always wondered why there is a chip not mounted on my STK500 board. Looking through the schematics this is U201, a AT45D021 5V Dataflash. What was it's purpose and why is it no longer mounted?

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Gwen,

You're talking babysitting so, I get the impression that you are fairly young.

Electronics has been my hobby since I was about 13 and, I'm now 53.

You have absolutely no idea as to how expensive this hobby gets. I don't think I can put a number on it. Maybe $100,00.00 U.S. or more over the past 40 years.

Case in point... I just bought a new Dell notebook PC this past week because, the old one was losing it. It crashed frequently. The cost was about $2,000.000. Now I find out that it won't support the old DOS based schematic and printed circuit board software that I have been using for about 20 years. The replacement cost for that looks to be about $800.00. On top of that, I can't recover the license keys from the old PC for ICCAVR 6.xx. Another $200.00. But wait! I now have to get ICCAVR 7.xx at $350.00 because ICCAVR is no longer available. All this, in one week.

But that is just the cost of maintaining a love afair with the hobby! I sometimes feel like a Coke or Heroin addict. I'm hooked and see no way to get free. But then, do I really want to get free? I'd say resoundingly, NO!

So don't dispare! These things happen. While you now feel the pain and anguish of your loss, it fades.

The longer I do it, the more I love it.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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The missing DataFlash has been discontinued and wasn't replaced by anything compatible with the STK500. Most DataFlashes are <5volts now.


My AVR Site

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$$

JChristoff
Illinois

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 7, 2011 - 05:04 AM
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Microcarl: use GCC. Much better, and free too! Also, be thankful you had the forsight not to get a Compaq. But that's a whole different kettle of fish...

LCD: What was the purpose of the dataflash? What is performing it's non-volatile storage now? (I assume the 8535's internal EEPROM).

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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JGrunt, the STK's main controller "guts" is identical to the AVRISP, at least as far as I can tell by eye. The STK just has extra powersupply circuitry and neat functions, and sockets/LEDs/Switches. I have both an AVRISP and a STK500 and am very happy with both.

OT: I see there's a "AVRISP MKII" out now. What's the advantages? I assume it just has the ability to program the newest devices...

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Hi microcarl :)

I'm still in High School.

I'm not giving up this hobby because of this setback..no way.
Just wish I did not have to shell out another 90$ :(
Just think..I could have bought a load of AVRs with that.

Actually, I think I can talk my mom into replacing the stk-500
as my folks are impressed with my new hobby now and seem willing
to fund it for me....but I sure hate to waste money by blowing up a programmer!!

If I can't build up a simple programmer to tide me over till a new stk comes
in I will fire up the old PIC stuff and play with that some...they are slow as
anything but at least I can still program something while I wait...And the
programmer for the PIC is pretty much indestructible so i can't blow it up
and even if I did it was only 12.98 at sparkfun.

And also I still have my resurrected butterfly to play with.

@abcminiuser
I was using low v programming when I goofed up.
Oddly enough I hooked up Hi-v parallel programming just a few minutes ago
and it managed to erase the chip...I don't seem to be able to change the fuses though
and I will have to write a small program and see if it can write it to the chip.

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Hey,

Check www.newae.com/old_site/download/...

Regards,

-Colin

Last Edited: Sun. Nov 13, 2005 - 05:51 AM
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Quote:
How can placing a target AVR device in the socket backwards damage the STK500??

Maybe the surface mounted chips need new firmware

Wonder how I could try reloading firmware to those chips?
And no idea how just plugging a chip in backwards could totally
fry this thing :( and it was at 3.3v when it fried..not 5v
as I have the low-voltage version of the 168 chips.

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$$

JChristoff
Illinois

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 7, 2011 - 05:04 AM
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Hi c_oflynn :)

Thanks for that link..I will check out that file and see if it offers any help.

Quote:
Are there two small holes (0.1") in the STK500 near the front-end

I don't see any holes...

I think I better turn in for the night and sleep on this...maybe it
won't seem as tragic after a nights sleep...

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Oh, that's another thing. Next to the 1200 on the board are pads for a 6-pin headder - what's this for? The 6-pin ISP headder is connected to both the 1200 and the 8535, so you could program them again with an AVRISP or similar - this is only if you want new firmware, not if the actual chips are screwed - so why the pads?

Gwen, i'm going to go investiagate those datasheets again. Seriously, I doubt you've destroyed anything serious so don't shell out (AND NO MORE OF THIS PIC TALK TOO!) for a new '500 just yet. And again, if it really is dead and it needs a new home...

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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abcminiuser,

Quote:
...be thankful you had the forsight not to get a Compaq.

Actually, I've bought two Compaq notebooks over the years. I got a Compaq 1640 in about 1988. This is a great machine. I still use it to run the table-top mill. A couple years later I bought a Compaq 1600 notebook. It was a peice of junk. It got sent back to Compaq three times, with no resolution. After about 8 months of nothing from Compaq for my $2, 400.00 U.S., I shelved it and bought a Gateway Solo 9300. It was a good machine, but had a very hard life traveling around the Middle-East. My oldest son bought a Compaq desk-top, as well. It was useless. He couldn't keep it running. And understand, we both are pretty computer literate. I have settled on Dell, for as long as they deliver a reliable machine. We have seven Dell notebooks and one Dell desk-top between the six of us in the family, and we have had ZERO issue over the past five years.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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The DataFlash was for your experiments' nonviolate storage.

Off Topic:
LOL I didn't know their were so many young AVR hobbyists. I'm about to go to High School(7th grade).


My AVR Site

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I'm computer literate too, I love computers and all they entail - incidentally, learning how the microcontrollers work has bettered my computer knowlege. In any case, I bought a second-hand Compaq Armada (which i'm currently using) and it suffers from a terrible design fault with the hinges and lid assembly (stiff hinges + two thin pieces of plastic holding the lid to the base = >:() and I plan on replacing it with a decent machine when I eventually get a job. IBM thinkpads are indestructable - although IBM are sub-contracting their manafacture now I hear - and reliable but are expensive for what you get, but I've seen nice laptops with VERY good specs latley for only AU$1000 - this time i'm googling before I buy.

I've said it before, but i'll say it again: Compaq (and HP/Compaq) sucks Donkey balls ('scuse). Compaq/HP if you ever read this: please a) Grab iron stick b) Fornicate Iron stick c) Remove iron stick d) Repeat. That's for all the unhappiness you've brought me.

EDIT: I'm 16, does that qualify me as a "young hobbyist?". ;)

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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abcminiuser,

 I'm 16, does that qualify me as a "young hobbyist?".  

Yes! And I envy your youth and the wonders of technology that you'll get to see within your lifetime...

Good night.

P.S. Hewlet Packard still makes excellent printers, and the worlds best calculators.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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There is a really cheap programmer at ere..it connects to the lpt port
it is 6.95 and works with several different software programs... It works
with that ponyprog..but I checked and that cannot program atmega168,169
and in fact seems to program only a few AVR types. Are there any other
freeware programs that can drive something like this and let you program
a wider range of AVRs ?

I will get another stk-500 if mine is permanently dead but I want to use the new
one as little as possible to avoid frying it too.So I could use a cheap
programmer to do day2day stuff and pull out the new stk500 to do hi-v
programming to set fuses and stuff.

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@Gwen

I would not expect the STK-500 to be fried after plugging in a M168 backwards.
But maybe the M168 would get fried.

You have tried with another chip , havent you ??

Btw: Atmel will release their new USB programmer in a week or so ($23 i think)
That one would support all AVR's , but requires the new 12.xx AvrStudio , to be reckognized.
https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

You don't want to be based on PonyProg , as i seem to remember it is no longer being developed
PP is a fine piece of sw , but doesn't know the newer chips.

AVRDUDE that comes with the WinAVR package (or look in sticky in GCC forum , V5.0) , will do what you want.

/Bingo

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Quote:
What was the purpose of the dataflash? What is performing it's non-volatile storage now? (I assume the 8535's internal EEPROM).

It was for user applications. Signals are available between portB and portE.
My STK500 has one in place, although I have never used it. It's an AT45D021A-RC, 2Mbit.

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microcarl wrote:
...P.S. Hewlet Packard still makes excellent printers...

good

JChristoff
Illinois

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 7, 2011 - 05:03 AM
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Yipeeee!!! :)

I got up this morning and decided to try one more thing...
I was thinking that maybe plugging things in backwards
made a glitch that might have wiped out part of the data
held in the flash ram of the 8535 chip.. So, I installed the
old version of AVRstudio from smiley's disk and then downgraded
the 8535 and it worked! Then I re-installed the newest beta of
AVRstudio and upgraded back to the latest firmware..still working! :)

So if anyone else ever has troubles with their stk500 and it is still
able to write the flash in the 8535 then try that..seems that chip
is prone to having its flash corrupted when you do something stoopid like
I did.

Thank a million to everyone that came here and offered helpful suggestions..
I don't know what I'd have done without you :)

BTW...I am getting one of those new 34$ AVRISP mkII thingies
as a backup programmer as soon as digikey has them in stock.

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I've made my own stk200/300 programmer with the following schematics: http://www.lancos.com/prog.html#... (look under AVR ISP parallel port interface)

Works like a charm, i've put a DB9 connector on my robot and am using this same connector for rs232 also.

To make things clear: the cable looks like this:

                     -----------= Serial port (serial comm.)
  =---------------XXXX
db9 connector        -----------= Parallel port (programmer)
robot                   

The XXXX represents my custom board, based on the schematics in the mentioned link. Please note that the DB9 connector on the robot's side is custom and not compatible with anything...

Vorik

Check out my open source Robotics software project BOTIX:
http://botix.sourceforge.net

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Gwen wrote:
Hi microcarl :)

I'm still in High School.

I'm not giving up this hobby because of this setback..no way.
Just wish I did not have to shell out another 90$ :(
Just think..I could have bought a load of AVRs with that.

Actually, I think I can talk my mom into replacing the stk-500
as my folks are impressed with my new hobby now and seem willing
to fund it for me....but I sure hate to waste money by blowing up a programmer!!

Even if you're not quite up to it yet, find someone on the board who has the parts and tools to replace them for you. $20-$30 is better than $90, and it seems your board is likely to be working otherwise..

Don't have one so not so sure on the pin count on these, but soldering all but the most pin packages can be easier than you might think. Just heat up the pins and work the part off the board, level the solder on the pads, and solder the new part down, using a sucker to get any excess off. Maybe not quite 'beginner easy' but not 'super advanced hard' either..

Alan

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Hi alan69 :)

I managed to fix my stk500..see above.

Thanks for the encouragment re: soldering surface mount chips.
I'm scared to death of trying to solder those things... I have an
invitation to use the electronics lab at the local Community College
and they have a setup just for doing things like removing/installing
surface mount thingies.. Plus there are lots of way cute guys there
willing to lend a hand :) sooo, I'm going to let them help me with stuff
like this..