English Prepositions ("at", "on")

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#1
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Hello AVRfreaks, hello native English speakers,

first I must excuse me, because my question has nothing to do with AVR (though an AVR is used with my application).

But because I know here are very wise guys (maybe also wise girls), I put this question at this place:

On a label I want to tell the user that he/she can do an online service by connecting the signals RxD, TxD and GND.

So, what do I have to write on the label for the connector:
For RS232 service use only RxD, TxD and GND on connector XY. or
For RS232 service use only RxD, TxD and GND at connector XY.

Thank you very much for an answer. In the Internet I found both, but I'm wondering if both is correct...

Greetings from Germany
Michael

[/b]

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

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on

Keep it simple it will not bite as hard

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I'd use "on", but I don't think "at" is incorrect, it's just a personal thing.
Why not start a poll? :wink: :wink:

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Since this post is about English usage, I'd like to point out that sutton's tag-line should read,
"Let's" as it's a contraction of "Let us".
Hope this isn't construed as a negative comment.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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John you are correct so have changed, (as you can see).
p.s. Should sutton have been Sutton? Then as I have used lower case then not the case.

Keep it simple it will not bite as hard

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Search me, your displayed name is all lower case!

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Thank you very much, Sutton and John_A_Brown for your answer.

I will use "on".

Have a good Day,
Michael

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

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I'd use on or of but not at.
Pedantic as ever!
C.H.

C. H.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
It's only waste if you don't use it!

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I thought people from England spoke english.

JChristoff
Illinois

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 7, 2011 - 03:08 AM
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Germanic was established as the main language in England around 1500 years ago but it has changed a bit since then :-)

Ralph Hilton

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... mainly due to the French. ;)

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... But French didn't have as big an impact on the English language as other conquering hordes because they weren't a horde, just a few knights and barons, and French stayed a "court" language until they all gave up and learned English. "Dieu et mon droit" and "Honi soit qui mal y pense", not exactly everyday phrases. Compare "husband" (Danish) - "wife" is ancient British - or "castle" (Latin). After a lot of thought I was finally able to come up with a French contribution - "bis-cuit". Twice cooked, ie crispy. Ooops, I'm off topic. "ON" connector XY.

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How about tampon, torture, bribe, bayonet, camouflage, debris, espionage, macabre, parachute, regime, ricochet, rifle, route, sabotage, syndicate, reprimand. French seems to account for most of the additions to the Germanic Old English.
I'd go for "on" aswell but "to" could be used.

Ralph Hilton

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what about deodorant?

JChristoff
Illinois

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jgrunt wrote:
what about deodorant?

Then I'd go for "in". The armpit, that is. Or perhaps "under"?

Ohhhh.....

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"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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The English words for animals - cow, sheep etc. - come from the Saxon because they had to look after them, but the English words for meat - beef, mutton etc. - come from the Norman (French) because they got to eat them.
C.H.

C. H.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
It's only waste if you don't use it!

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rhilton wrote:
How about tampon, torture, bribe, bayonet, camouflage, debris, espionage, macabre, parachute, regime, ricochet, rifle, route, sabotage, syndicate, reprimand. French seems to account for most of the additions to the Germanic Old English.
I'd go for "on" aswell but "to" could be used.

Notice they're all bad, messy and painful words. Incidentally, is "Ze Wine!" a French contribution? Also: http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/....

- Dean :twisted:
(Disclaimer: Above rambings were made toung-in-cheek and thus shouldn't be read by anyone ;))

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Nice one Dean!
Where is nice derivide from? :lol:

Keep it simple it will not bite as hard

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Whoops! Just saw that I put in the new address of my documentation in wrong for my signature; apologies everybody. Now, on to funnier things: anyone else got any international humour? I assume, of couse, that we can all take a good ribbing in the spirit of fun...

Bet there's almost as much "Australian" humour as there is English and French :D!

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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peret wrote:
... But French didn't have as big an impact on the English language as other conquering hordes because they weren't a horde, just a few knights and barons, and French stayed a "court" language until they all gave up and learned English.

Then you'll be interested in going to the Wikipedia article about the English Language:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eng...

Specifically, this part is interesting:

Quote:
Word origins

Main article: Lists of English words of international origin

One of the consequences of the French influence is that the vocabulary of English is, to a certain extent, divided between those words which are Germanic (mostly Old English), and those which are "Latinate" (Latin-derived, mostly from Norman French but some borrowed directly from Latin).

A computerised survey of about 80,000 words in the old Shorter Oxford Dictionary (3rd edition) was published in Ordered Profusion by Thomas Finkenstaedt and Dieter Wolff (1973) which estimated the origin of English words as follows:

* French, including Old French and early Anglo-French: 28.3%
* Latin, including modern scientific and technical Latin: 28.24%
* Old and Middle English, Old Norse, and Dutch: 25%
* Greek: 5.32%
* No etymology given: 4.03%
* Derived from proper names: 3.28%
* All other languages contributed less than 1%

James D. Nicoll made the oft-quoted observation: "The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary." [2]

And the quote at the bottom there, is just priceless. :)

Eric

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Anyway, "on" will be fine.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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"on" UNDER avrfreaks supervision ;-)