Atmel Biometrics chip - any experience with it?

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All that I have heard about them is what Atmel spoke about at the seminars.

As I understand it, the processing involved in matching the fingerprint to a person well enough to deny or allow access to something is much more than an AVR can do.

/* John Butera */

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Does anyone know of a source for the dev board and chip?

Also, any initial suggestions on how to interface the chip to M128?

Thanks for any and all replies.

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I would also be interested in this. I would like to know if anyone has been successfull in using their fingerprint sensor and sending it to a PC to make an image.

Thanks

Adam

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One of my former co-workers demonstrated his app for using the Atmel fingerprint thingy to us. I don't recall whether the PC was involved with any "image". We were the test subjects with varying fingers. It seemed to work fine to me, but that was the first time I had seen the guts of one so I've nothing to compare. The contract was fulfilled, and AFAIK it is in production. If I tell you more I'll have to shoot you.

So my summary answer is yes, someone has been successful. I have no info on comparing the Atmel solution to others, cost comparisons, or whether Pepsi's assertion about not enough horsepower in the AVR applies.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Scanning quickly through some of the datasheets seem to imply that the devices are not doing any recognition whatsoever, it's simply a sensor. There is no AVR involved either, as I could see.
There's nothing new to the idea of sweeping the finger over the sensor. Fingerprint have had that for years. However Atmel claims the patented that in 1996 ?? Let the fight begin ;-)

/Jesper
http://www.yampp.com
The quick black AVR jumped over the lazy PIC.
What boots up, must come down.

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I was simply looking for a device/sensor that I can use to get a bitmap to a computer. I think I may be able to find sofware that will compare to fingerprint images together and give me a yes no result.

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Most commercial sensors you can buy will do that, and normally includes the software. However, it's not bitmaps that are compared, it's some derivation of the fingerprint data.

/Jesper
http://www.yampp.com
The quick black AVR jumped over the lazy PIC.
What boots up, must come down.

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In the case of fingerprint recognition, I suspect, there is a whole lot of "image" translation involved. For example, you may need to rotate one image relative to the reference to get a match. This could involve quite a bit of memory, even if you can tolerate the processing delay. All of this is NOT to say that it can't be done; my bet is that it could be a fair challenge.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net