Max range of WIFI

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Are there a list anywhere about the max range of the different WIFI modes? (speeds).
And is it possible to change settings for long range?

I want to make a point to point connection over about 800 meter and want to know what the max speed is.

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There are other factors, such as the antenna.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Wikipedia doesn't seem too hopeful about you reaching 800m:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-...

Personal experience suggests it is right. (I have had several "n" routers - almost none can deliver a signal to my garden shed that it is about 100m from where the router is located though it's true that signal is indoors behind two walls).

To extend range you can, of course, get repeaters (assuming there's something in the intervening 800m that will power them).

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That's not a problem I can see target, so it can be two parabolic dishes if needed, I(we) own the land between so I don't care about to strong a signal.

I just want to know if it's a way to get fast internet, I can max get 4Mbit, my "neighbor" live in an other county with better connections, we are on each side of a valley.

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But how does city/campus WiFi work?
When I lived in us and lived on our sailboat most of the harbors had WiFi.
But as an example GSM protocol have a max range of 35 Km because of the delay.(can't reach the correct timeslot).
I will like to know the limits for WiFi (and if they can be changed), I'm the only one that will use it so both ends can have a special setup, but I don't want to change HW.

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Quote:

But how does city/campus WiFi work?

A LOT of access points. Typically not more than 50 metres apart in-doors and perhaps a few hundred at most outdoors - lower if there is a lot of reinforced concrete around..

If possible I would go with a highly directional antenna. E.g. if it is for connecting two buildings far apart it might work. (I know for a fact that Swedish gadget shop-chain Kjell&Co had a highly directional antenna - they claimed a pair of those could bridge a few kilometres in a free line of sight.)

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How much can you afford to pay? There are turnkey solutions. http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Mile-Range-50dBm-Long-Range-WIFI-Booster-USB-Receiver-/251507774953

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There are wifi bridges/routers with high output power. Most wifi radios work at about 20dB, while high power ones will do 30dB or more. On top of that, putting highly directional antennas at each end will increase the signal received at the far end. My totally uneducated guess is that ~30dB transmit power + ~12 dB antennas at each end + direct line of sight will get you the range you want.

- S

ps: you'll need to check if that combination will be legal in your country. There are many places that limit the directed power in the 2.4GHz band.

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Quote:
ps: you'll need to check if that combination will be legal in your country. There are many places that limit the directed power in the 2.4GHz band.

As I said it's is fare out over a valley where I own the land so I don't care.(if anyone find out I will ask them to get off my land).

So from what I read here there are no limit other than signal strength!?

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In the beginnings the antenna needed to be as high as possible from the access point to get the best range. I just upgraded to a new Netgear gigabit router with the latest wifi and it works fantastic for range even with it being in the basement of the house.

If your router/access point has an external antenna capability then you can go the route of a directional antenna, or look online for high power range extenders.

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BTW it may not be for you but I've found Powerline to be a great way to get a network signal to those "hard to reach" places. It does, of course, require the two locations to be on the same mains supply of course. At the "far end" you could then install an access point to repeat the wifi signal with the same SSID and security and the DHCP would all be from the one server. I keep bying PowerLine adapters and have them dotted around various places in the house (and garden shed which has a spur mains connection).

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sparrow2 wrote:
That's not a problem I can see target, so it can be two parabolic dishes if needed, I(we) own the land between so I don't care about to strong a signal.
Big Bend 50 Ultra Marathon HSMM-Mesh(TM) networking by Jim Kinter (YouTube; Apr 24, 2013)
Select "About" to read the gain, power, and range.
sparrow2 wrote:
I just want to know if it's a way to get fast internet, I can max get 4Mbit, my "neighbor" live in an other county with better connections, we are on each side of a valley.
Wireless Networking in the Developing World

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
If possible I would go with a highly directional antenna. E.g. if it is for connecting two buildings far apart it might work.
Waveguide antennas have excellent gain but the usual ones weigh a "ton"; one needs to construct a strong mast and mounts.
A cantenna may work.
How To Build A Tin Can Waveguide WiFi Antenna by Gregory Rehm.
"for 802.11(b or g) Wireless Networks or other 2.4GHz Applications"

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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sparrow2 wrote:
But how does city/campus WiFi work?
One way to implement that:
1. Introduction to HSMM-MESH or Broadband-Hamnet by klreeve123 (YouTube; Apr 14, 2013)

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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sparrow2 wrote:
... I own the land ...
A number of points of view and projections of power by authority.
Then add ether, water, air, outer space, etc.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Check out "Pringle can antenna". These are 2.4GHz antennas made from the containers that "Pringle" pseudo-potatochips come in. They have significant gain and are widely used as WiFi range extenders.

Google: pringles wifi antenna distance

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A Pringles can is not the best value for this whereas the pasta sauce can has some value.
802.11b Homebrew Antenna Shootout - 2/14/2

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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If I should build something I guess it will be something like this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Thpdfw2b9uM
And he has an 19 element video aswell

But first try will be a sat dish I guess.

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Quote:
One way to implement that:
1. Introduction to HSMM-MESH or Broadband-Hamnet by klreeve123 (YouTube; Apr 14, 2013)

If I read it correct, this need a modified router.

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Using online parh loss calculators you can estimate the path loss, thus determine the gain of the antennas required. I've done 3km links using high gain antennas.

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thanks Kartman

At what speed?

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sparrow2 wrote:
If I should build something I guess it will be something like this
Yagi Cantenna (Yagi in a Can) 2.4GHz by andrew mcneil
Wow!
Very directional is good for interference prevention and rejection.
If I correctly heard it starts with a toilet brush holder.
Its mount may be iffy; birds will like to perch on the antenna.
Raptors weigh some; may want a stronger mount and some rough wood on top for the birds.
sparrow2 wrote:
But first try will be a sat dish I guess.
Its feed may need to be changed.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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sparrow2 wrote:
If I read it correct, this need a modified router.
Mesh Upgrade by AustinHams (YouTube; Oct 4, 2013)
"Upgrading Your previous versions of HSMM-MESH node firmware to the newest 1.0."
Point-to-point links run with unmodified firmware; appears some use the full WLAN band instead of only the ham part of WLAN.
Austin Amateur Radio Club

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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At what speed? 11mbit. This was in the 90's with pre wifi stuff. We used some big yagis and 1/2" heliax. Cnt400 is much cheaper these days. With the cost of wireless routers, you can put them in an enclosure below the aerial and avoid the loss in long antenna cables. You'll want a wireless router with detachable antennas so that you can attach a larger antenna.

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sparrow2 wrote:
And is it possible to change settings for long range?
Yes.
Linksys WRT54G
"The Open Source community has written several firmware versions for it that allow for complete customisation of every transmission parameter. In particular, OpenWRT firmware allows for the adjustment of the acknowledgment time of the MAC layer, as well as the output power."
"Fortunately, the OpenWRT firmware allows for adjusting the ACK timing."
"The purpose of the modification of the standard WiFi MAC is to make it suitable for long distance applications by replacing the CSMA Media Access Control with TDMA. The latter is better suited for long distance point-to-point links since it does not require the reception of ACKs."
Long Distance 802.11 in Venezuela (Wireless Networking in the Developing World)
280km, 100mW, repurposed satellite dishes.

Radio Mobile by Roger Coude.
"This software is a tool used to predict the performance of a radio system."

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Quote:
I want to make a point to point connection over about 800 meter and want to know what the max speed is.
My internet connection requires two hops, 0.3 km and 4.5 km. Right now my download speed is 20 Mbps. I am using 2.4Gb Ubiquity equipment.

Don

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sparrow2 wrote:

I want to make a point to point connection over about 800 meter and want to know what the max speed is.

Making your own antennas could be a good idea 10 years ago. Using two of these equipments https://shop.omg.de/ubiquiti-networks/5-ghz/airgrid-m/airgrid-m5-ag-5g23-23dbi-gitter-antenne/a-13037/ I could now establish a 40-50Mbps full duplex link at 7Km distance.

Dor

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Mikrotik and Ubiquity are the two leading low cost vendors for long range wifi. Both are shaking up the markets.

I've used mikrotik with great success.

800m should be obtainable providing you have line of sight, enough clearance from object so not as to intrude too far into the fresnel zone and most importantly no trees in the way.

Mikrotik SXT or UBNT Nanobridge should do what you need.

http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#nanob...
http://routerboard.com/products

Mikrotik do several versions of SXT - price & performance options.

Do your research, understand rf path loss and fresnel zones, before you spend your money.

Always choose antenna gain over more RF power. You are limited to a certain power at the antenna by law, and whether or not you own the land makes no difference. Don't be antisocial the kill other people's wifi by blasting out power.

And besides, increasing the power leads to reduced RF performance, and thus reduced data rates compared to antenna gain.

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Long range primarily comes from directional antennas with short low loss coax cable.

Easy to do:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Pr...

Hard to do:
http://www.l-com.com/wireless-an...

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Quote:
You are limited to a certain power at the antenna by law

If you are concerned about being legal, ensure that you are not limited by EIRP rather than power at the input to the antenna.

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Priorities:
Antenna gain if possible
lower data rates, like 802.11b's rates or lowest in 802.11g. Low rate = reduced signal-to-noise requirement for a given error rate = longer range by far.