Good books for circuit design and analysis

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Hi!
I'm sorry if my question isn't first one. But I couldn't find any book thread sticked in this subforum. I mean there is a book thread in AVR one. But there isn't any here.

My question is pretty simple: which books could you suggest on the subject?

In this time I read 'Alexander C, Sadiku M. Fundamentals of Electric Circuits'. I must say the book is better (just for me) than 'The Art of Electronics' in some parts of it. Of course I know about 'Tietze and Schenk's good ones.

I'm not a beginner in circuit design, but I'm also not a highly experienced. I just want to find something beautiful and simple in reading... with a deep knowledge.

Ok, I'm interested exactly in analog (mostly analog) circuit design and its analysis :)

Thanks in advance!

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The late Jim Williams and Robert (Bob) Dobkin (Linear Technology) co-authored a number of books.
IIRC this was the last one they were able to create:
Analog Circuit Design - A Tutorial Guide to Applications and Solutions (Linear Technology)
P.S.
ACE Awards 2014 Celebrate Ecosystem, Awards close to our hearts by Susan Rambo (EE Times, 4/6/2014, last page)

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Thirty years ago I learnt pretty much everything I know about electronics from this:

http://books.google.ca/books/abo...

(that's probably the reason that these days I am a software not a hardware engineer! :lol: )

BTW I must say that this is a real testament to the power of Google. I have the book somewhere but couldn't find it so I just typed "yellow covered book about electronics" into Google (nothing more) and it was able to remind me what the book was called in the first 10 hits!

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Ah-ha. I used Milman and Halkias too. Possibly a few years earlier than you. It was a pretty good textbook then. There may be better ones nowadays.

David.

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Quote:
It was a pretty good textbook then. There may be better ones nowadays.
What's a textbook?

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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If you are interested in amplifier circuits, Op Amps For Everyone, by Ron Macini (Texas Instruments) is a pretty good beginner's primer.

Edit: T.I. even has it for free on their website (though a bound copy is nice to hold...)

http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slod006b/slod006b.pdf

Science is not consensus. Science is numbers.

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Paul Horowits & Winfield Hill, The Art of Electronics. Have had the 2nd edition and the 3rd edition is just about to happen.

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Ha. I am not holding my breath. The 3rd edition has been "just about to happen" for something like three years now.

Science is not consensus. Science is numbers.

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Milman & Halkias.. mid seventies.. 40 year ago
I found Schaums series of books good value for time

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Thank you very much, friends! Very interesting book have been proposed to me. I must say I have a bound copy of 'Op Amps for Everyone' by Mancini. Unfortunately it's translated into Russian. I would prefer using untranslated one. But it's expensive delight to me))) So e-book is just for me))

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Quote:

Milman & Halkias.. mid seventies.. 40 year ago

As everyone knows the direction that electrons flow has changed at least 3 times in those intervening four decades ;-)
Quote:

What's a textbook?

If only God had invented Wikipedia eh? Oh ... wait a minute ... she did:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tex...

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An interesting Wikipedia entry. Especially the discussion of price, market, second-hand trade, ...

Personally, I would prefer a well-written paper book to any electronic version.

Let's face it. Even Computer Science has a mature Syllabus. Most algorithms, techniques etc were developed over thirty years ago.

So a respected textbook remains in print. And is possibly updated with new editions.

Oh, I just looked at my "Millman and Halkias". It is (c) 1972. So I must have bought it after leaving University. An unusual book choice for a Dairy Farmer! And incidentally, it looks as if it has not been opened for many years.

David.

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Quote:
If only God had invented Wikipedia eh? Oh ... wait a minute ... she did:

If the expression "God" itself is already female, what would "goddess" actually mean? And would a male god then be called "Godzilla"?

Einstein was right: "Two things are unlimited: the universe and the human stupidity. But i'm not quite sure about the former..."

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Careful or you'll fuel an equivalent of the actor/actress debate!

(female actors like to be called actors these days as actress is a diminutive word effectively meaning "assistant actor" ;-))

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Ok, thanks for a lot of information. I'm wondering if is there any possibility to download any google book as PDF? Or it breaks copyrights? It's interesting: i can see book, i can make screenshots but i can't save it to my hdd))) But actually I can save it with lots of efforts making screenshots)))

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And now for some spin

"... As everyone knows the direction that electrons flow has changed at least 3 times in those intervening four decades ..."

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david.prentice wrote:
An unusual book choice for a Dairy Farmer! And incidentally, it looks as if it has not been opened for many years.
What an ungrateful bunch of dairy cows you have. You spend your scarce funds, and they don't even have the courtesy to open it. Sheesh... what is the world coming to?

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I like this one:

"Analog Design Essentials"

http://www.springer.com/engineer...

It goes far behind the usual stuff. Its more oriented
to IC design, but the concepts and ideas are all so
well explained that I learned very much out of it even
if I will probably never design an IC.

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ossi, that's also what I have meant when I opened the topic))) The books which go far beyond the usual things)

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valusoft wrote:
david.prentice wrote:
An unusual book choice for a Dairy Farmer! And incidentally, it looks as if it has not been opened for many years.
What an ungrateful bunch of dairy cows you have. You spend your scarce funds, and they don't even have the courtesy to open it. Sheesh... what is the world coming to?

Perhaps these cows would appreciate it more? My son used to love this book...

http://www.amazon.com/Click-Clack-Moo-Cows-That/dp/1442433701/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397219103&sr=8-1&keywords=click+clack+moo

Science is not consensus. Science is numbers.

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Quote:
What an ungrateful bunch of dairy cows you have.

Don't slag off those cows... they are outstanding in their field.

Einstein was right: "Two things are unlimited: the universe and the human stupidity. But i'm not quite sure about the former..."

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OT:

Quote:
Even Computer Science has a mature Syllabus. Most algorithms, techniques etc were developed over thirty years ago.

So a respected textbook remains in print.

Ohh.. Too good to be left there hanging.. Let see, then:

Dijkstra.
Wirth.
Aho, Hopcroft, Sethi, Ullman (in several permutations).
C J Date.
Sommerville, IIRC.
Tannenbaum, of-course.

McConnell, Hunt, R. C. Martin, Fowler, Brooks, Beck, DeMarco, GoF, Bjarne..

Not to mention Kernighan & Ritchie.

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Although my Holstein cows were not really into Electronics, they were a lot more intelligent than the Jersey heifers that currently live on this farm.

David.

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hobbss wrote:
valusoft wrote:

Perhaps these cows would appreciate it more? My son used to love this book...

http://www.amazon.com/Click-Clack-Moo-Cows-That/dp/1442433701/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397219103&sr=8-1&keywords=click+clack+moo


Oh, thanks! This book is pretty useful! It revealed all the secrets of analog circuits design! I'm going to buy it as soon as possible!

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Johan

The Bible. The Art of Computer Programming (all 7 volumes) by Donald Knuth.

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I think you should place order for your required PCB at pcbmaking.com and I m sure you will get your job done quickly on affordable price. It provides professional PCB with Free shipping and big discount price. Good luck!

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clawson wrote:
Thirty years ago I learnt pretty much everything I know about electronics from this:

http://books.google.ca/books/abo...


That was one of our course set books!

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I've come to the conclusion that there is no one "best book for learning electronics".

I have most of the classics (Horowitz, Millman, Macini, etc) in my shop. I find it best to use multiple sources for a given topic. One book will have a better written explanation than the others. One will address more specifically my topic of interest du jour. Sometimes I'll pick up part of the answer I'm looking for in one book and the rest in another book. Often one book has nothing at all about a topic of interest, while another has a whole section about it.

So: The "best book" is actually "the most books".

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Here's two more:

via

Reactance, impedance, and electromagnetics are big subjects that I've only lightly touched on. They're pretty interesting, too! I highly recommend the book High-Speed Digital Design for a deep and dirty look at working with high-speed systems.1 The ARRL Handbook from the American Radio Relay League is possibly the best introduction to electronics available.2 It doesn't skimp on the math, but never goes beyond complex numbers. The focus is decidedly on radios, since this is the bible of ham radio, but the basics of electronics are covered here better than any other book I've found. There's a new edition every year; my dad bought me a copy in 1966, and since then I've "upgraded" every decade or so.

...

Endnotes

  1. Johnson, Howard and Martin Graham. High-Speed Digital Design,1993 PTR Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
  2. The ARRL Handbook, American Radio Relay League. Published afresh every year. www.arrl.org.

Probing pointers, Take 2

March 25, 2012

Jack tests several probes to see how different probes change the results.

http://www.embedded.com/electronics-blogs/break-points/4369755/Probing-pointers--Take-2

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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clawson wrote:

Thirty years ago I learnt pretty much everything I know about electronics from this:

http://books.google.ca/books/about/Integrated_Electronics.html?id=Qta8v9hJBMAC

(that's probably the reason that these days I am a software not a hardware engineer! :lol: )

BTW I must say that this is a real testament to the power of Google. I have the book somewhere but couldn't find it so I just typed "yellow covered book about electronics" into Google (nothing more) and it was able to remind me what the book was called in the first 10 hits!

There's several places you can download it for free also!

Just got mine will start looking it over in the morn....thanks

Happy Trails,

Mike

JaxCoder.com