European Wire Sizes?

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In U.S., we use AWG (American Wire Gauge) to designate wire sizes. What is used in Europe? Is there a list somewhere of standard sizes?

Thanks
Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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We have *lots* of ways of describing it, all of which are exactly the way you don't want it when you need it...

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search... <-- check the parametric options.

Oddly enough, we even use AWG though no-one has any idea how thick it is; most common is probably something along the lines of '7/.6' which is seven strands of point six millimeter (actually, that's a fairly fat wire!) but we also spec by external diameter, current capability and so on.

http://www.technick.net/public/c... gives an idea. I think the main difference is that we specify the number of strands and their individual thicknesses in many cases rather than the bundle size.

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I was brought up with SWG. (Standard Wire Gauge)

Now that we are in the 21st century, we use a more logical system. SWG is not used any more but the world has to accept that AWG is understood by Americans.

You should be able to find conversion tables for AWG, SWG, diameter, cross-secional area, ...

And to keep Uncle Bob happy, you might even find the results in 1/64ths of an inch !

Of course AWG and SWG have different sizes. But at least they have unique names. Unlike other bastardised imperial measurements.

David.

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I was in Eu over the december /january period and needes ome hookup wire.
Called the supplier and was given to know that that EU is moving toward application driven product based on atributes such a temperature/ halon/ smoke/ etc classification followed by conductor attribute.

For example H07-U, H07-R H07-K wire application classifications followed by conductor atributes

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Quote:

I was brought up with SWG. (Standard Wire Gauge)

+1

I have done a lot of brushless motor hand rewinding in my time and this involves buying a lot of enammelled copper wire. Of course most articles/tutorials on the internet are from America so there's always been confusion about wire gauges being specified.

Some resources under "Calculators, spreadsheets, tables" here:

http://www.bavaria-direct.co.za/...

Possibly the best table to use would be this one:

http://www.micronradiocontrol.co...

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clawson wrote:

Possibly the best table to use would be this one:

http://www.micronradiocontrol.co...


Agreed. Thanks.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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We use the number of square millimeters cross section of the wire. And for the rest it's descriptive, like
Insulation: PVC (Teflon, Silicone)
Voltage rating: 500 V AC
Solid or stranded (7x 0,14 mm2)

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Thanks, folks.

That really helps.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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For (thin) enamelled wire her some product data from
a european based manufacturer:

http://www.elektrisola.com/ename...

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I figured you Euro guys would have a more intelligent system than we have here. You do for almost everything else!

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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Tom,

You obviously haven't been following the Eurovision Song Contest! A dud (perhaps with the exception of Abba) IMHO. :lol:

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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SWG has previously been known as BWG (British Wire Gauge) and IWG (Imperial Wire Gauge) dating from 1883 so predates all this euro, SI nonsense and is in multiples of 0.001in.

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Looking at the link that you posted, SWG is just as esoteric as any other system.

I must admit that you recognise SWG welding rods by eye. e.g. 4 SWG looks very different to 6 SWG.
Aluminium sheet by eye, weight and feel. e.g. 16 SWG
Tinplate by eye, weight, feel. e.g. 22 SWG
Enamelled copper wire by eye, feel. e.g. 28 SWG

Anything out of the ordinary requires reading the label on the bobbin of wire.

And of course, my eyesight was better!

David.

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Aye, but when I look at the half-dozen high temperature insulated copper wire reel on my bench, they're all marked by diameter in millimetres...

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Good catch, Neil. Indeed, I found enamel wire to be in mm diameter too.
Odd, isn't it ?

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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My application - winding HF inductors - will probably use enamel wire by a co-worker in Belgium. So, it looks like its mm.

Does anyone know if that is the total diameter, or the diameter of the copper? That could be significant for smaller gauges, I suspect.

Thanks
Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Hi Jim,
all given in the link gien in my post above.

ELEKTRISOLA manufactures a lot of wire and has a lot of
data on their site. They also provide HF litz-wire and corresponding data.

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I'll get the electric ruler on a few samples at work today. It's better than working!

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Quote:

Does anyone know if that is the total diameter, or the diameter of the copper? That could be significant for smaller gauges, I suspect.

The whole thing including the enamel I believe as you can use digital vernier calipers to check wire gauge and that's obviously measuring the outside diameter.

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Whether it is AWG or SWG or mm, this refers to the copper diameter.

Any enamel or plastic covering is extra. You need the O.D. for winding a coil. So you need both dimensions in mm.

I am sure that your suppliers will have all the necessary information.

David.

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Measured four wires on the desk today:

indicated measured enamelled?
0.2mm     0.22mm   yes
0.315mm   0.35mm   yes
0.56mm    0.63mm   yes
24swg     0.60mm   yes

24swg is listed as 0.559mm but has a normative metric size of 0.60mm.

I guess they measure it with the enamel off.

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And they were all a nanosecond long?

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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Nah, some of the reels were still full. A few microseconds there, I reckon!

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Thanks, very much!

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net