Toolchain for mac?

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I did search before posting, but did not find anything here in the *ARM* section. Searching for "mac gcc" gives lots of AVR results, but when you limit the search to this community, nada.

I'm pretty experienced with the AVR side of the house, but I have a project where I'm likely to start using an ATSAMS70N19 (I need SDHC, AES and hi-speed USB). I've ordered a SAME70 XPLD board to begin experiments with, and I have an ATMelICE which which (I assume?) I can do JTAG programming (with avrdude?).

One of the next things on my to-do list is to get a mac toolchain. I assume there's going to be more to it than just getting an ARM GCC compiler for mac... is there a set of headers for the various devices and/or a baby C library like there is for AVR?

If I really have to, I can use an IDE in a Windows VM, but frankly I'd be holding my nose the entire time, and it's hard to get work done with only one hand free.

P.s. I do see something potentially useful here, but the registration system is completely broken. The e-mail to verify your address contains a supposed verification link that isn't even close to a proper URL.

Last Edited: Thu. Aug 3, 2017 - 03:06 PM
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I've been developing for the SAMD21 on a mac for about a year now - you might be able to leverage some/most/all of this for the SAMS70, but No Guarantees.  :)

First thing I needed was a compiler and a way to program the chip - the Xplained Pro boards have an on-board debugger, and the samw25 Xplained Pro (and D21 Xplained pro, and Atmel SAM-ICE, which I use for programming custom boards) was pretty straightforward to get working with OpenOCD 0.9  (I've been having some problems with OpenOCD 0.10 that I haven't figured out yet - but I haven't spent much time trying, either, since 0.9 works well enough for me)  You can install OpenOCD via Homebrew.  I use a combination of OpenOCD and GDB to program the chips.  Somewhere in this forum is more information about how to use OpenOCD+GDB for programming - let me know if you have trouble finding it.  I found I needed both a .bin file for actual programming of the chip and the .elf file I generated it from (for debugging).  You'll also need to learn about linker scripts to make sure you put everything where it needs to go.

Regarding the compiler, I use the GNU ARM embedded toolchain for mac ( https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-em... ) - I've been using 5.4 2016Q3.  Most of the Atmel ASF examples come with a GNU Makefile which works well enough, though they're pretty confusingly written.  Dig around a bit until you understand them.

 

Personally, I find the Mac setup (and other posix-type setups in general) a lot easier to work with than the whole Atmel Studio/Visual Studio thing, but it does make it hard to get certain questions answered - everyone here is very Windows-focused.  Good luck!  I'll help if I can...

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Thank you for all of those pointers. It's going to take me some time to digest, but I wanted to say "Thank you" right away. :)

 

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Well, it looks like Microchip provides an ARM toolchain for MacOS.

http://www.microchip.com/development-tools/atmel-studio-7/avr-and-arm-toolchains-(c-compilers)

But the download doesn't seem to be working for me at the moment...

(link fixed, but still doesn't work.)

 

Otherwise, you can download the binaries from launchpad.net, and you'll need to find CMSIS-Atmel somewhere...

Ah.   There is also: http://ww1.microchip.com/downloa... (note that a ".atpack" file is actually just a zip file, so you can rename it and unpack it.)

 

Last Edited: Sat. Aug 5, 2017 - 04:07 AM