Some equivalent of nits?

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Sorry for the bit offtopicness - it's a mechanical question, no need to start a new forum ;-)

Is there any dissasemblable equivalent of these? Whats the english word for them?

I have a connection of two pieces of metal, which will rotate around the connection. But I wanna be able to dissasemble the connection. I don't wanna use a screw, because it would most likely untighten after a few movements.

Thanks,
David

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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Rivets are what you are looking for.

I have seen "rivets" like the very bottom left hand one that had an internal threads so that you could screw a normal screw into them. No idea what they are called!

Good luck

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Those are rivets of various type.

One method would be to use what are called sholder bolts. These are usually bolts that are only partially threaded. The big difference is that the sholder is usually larger in diameter then the threaded part. For securing the nut, you can use a "Self-Locking" style nut to keep it from un-threading off of the sholder bolt.

In addition, the sholder bolt is usually selected to be a length that it can be drawn up tight against the supporting bracket and the sholder will still allow free movement of the part that needs to remain movable.

There are sholder bolt that use external threads, as just described. But there are also sholder bolts that have internal threads. In both cases, lock washers can be effectively used as, the fastening screw can be drawn tight against the supporting component.

And then too, don't discount the use of some thread locking material. Here in the U.S., we use a lot of "Lock-Tight" which is a liquid that comes in different ratings as to its effective locking ability.

I have also used Teflon tape and Finger Nail Polish as locking agents with some good success.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Thanks for the advice all!

Quote:
And then too, don't discount the use of some thread locking material. Here in the U.S., we use a lot of "Lock-Tight" which is a liquid that comes in different ratings as to its effective locking ability.

Carl, unfortunately I'll need to dissasemble it from time to time, so I'm looking for a solution that will allow me to reasemble and dissasemble it at will.

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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Have you thought about a Dowel pin, similiar to what you have shown, but with a hole drilled in the end and, just using a Clevis pin.

Clevis pins are those things that look like "Bobby-Pins" that slip into the hole and are self retaining because the humpy shape holds them in place at the end of the dowel pin.

If you used the correct size, they are very reliable and extreemly quick dis-assembly.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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There are grades of lock-tight that are designed to be broken (with a reasonable amount of torque on the screwdriver/spanner) when you want to undo whatever it is you did up. We use the stuff for fixing calibration screws and the like in place (where we might want to re-calibrate at a later date)

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Bolt, with "Castle Nut" and Cotter Pin. Used for eons. Easily disassembled. This site has pictures:

[url]
http://myword.info/sendword.php?...
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Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Jim: Very interesting! Now just to find a slovakian distributor.

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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There are Screw Posts used as an alternative to binding holed paper sheets.

http://www.screwpost.com/

Stan

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In the Opto-electronics realm, nits are the same as candelas per meter squared. Similar to lumens?

Imagecraft compiler user

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Castle nuts have been around at least 100 years, if not more. They are widely used on farm equipment that MUST not come loose. Also industrial machinery.

One annoying thing about them is that the screw or bolt has to have a hole through it. This means that the hole has to be positioned according to the thickness of the material. Or, you add washers either under the head or the nut or both to make the required thickness.

In the US, any "real" hardware store will have them in various sizes. Also, places that sell automobile parts. Also automobile "junk yards" might have them.

Also, in the US, most larger cities have "hardware distributors" that sell mostly to industrial users. McMaster-Carr (sp?) is a catalog distributor. But, from these places, you usually have to purchase a whole box of each piece (nut, cotter pin, screw/bolt).

by the way, "Loc-Tight" is a resin that is catalyzed by the metal and lack of oxygen. It comes in a variety of strengths. When put on a nut, the nut will not come off accidently. But, you can break the resin and remove the nut. Because of Loc-Tight, the use of castle nuts has dropped very much.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net