Replacing the XMEGA on an Xplained XMEGA A1?

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Hello.

 

I have a Xplained XMEGA A1 board which contain the faulty ATxmega128A1, however I also got new ATmega128A1U ICs(100pin TQFP) which is what is on that Xplained board.

 

I am hesitant to do what I plan to do and as such wanted to ask you about it, what I wonder is:

Why would/could I not replace the faulty XMEGA on the Xplained with the new A1U chip?

 

As long as I am careful with the removal there shouldn't be any difference as far as pin layout is concerned right?

 

Regards

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Comparing the pinouts, it appears they are compatible.  IIRC, PORTD6 and PORTD7 are N.C. on the A1 Xplained, so there won't be any circuitry hanging on the A1U's USB.

Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Atmel Studio 7.0 on Windows 10

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

 

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A1U is LVTTL and LVCMOS whereas A1 was almost.

DAC is different.

BOD levels for the better.

Otherwise should be pin hardware compatible.

Microchip Technology Inc

Microchip

AVR1019: Migration from ATxmega128A1/64A1 to ATxmega1281U/64A1U

http://www.microchip.com//wwwAppNotes/AppNotes.aspx?appnote=en591086

via http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/atxmega128a1u

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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How do you feel about soldering SMD devices? 

274,207,281-1 The largest known Mersenne Prime

Measure twice, cry, go back to the hardware store

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A new board costs ~$30 - is it worth it ... ?

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Completely lost track of this, I apologise.

 

SMD soldering is only fun, and removing this IC would be good practice since if I screw it up it isn't that big of a deal.

 

The main reason is that all XMEGA A1U dev. boards I can find is more like 50-60USD(estimating, I think in terms of SEK, Swedish kronor), and I am an autistic person which makes my motivation for things to be the crucial factor. And given the apparently poor state of the ADC on the first XMEGA A(ATxmega128A1) I find it hard to get y self to invest any time in exploring the chip because I would soon be facing some of all the faults that I have read that the chip has.

 

And since I own the XMEGA A1U IC already it would not take long to do so I will do it.

 

Then I could continue with the exploration of the XMEGA A knowing everything is working, AFAIK.

 

I might even go so far as to solder on a couple of wires and glue them to the board or something, in order to make the USB transceiver accessible. I haven't ever used USB and if it wasen't for the fact that someone here on AVRfreaks in some thread I found have shared all the files required to get USB going on an XMEGA it would be a monster of a project for me to get USB working, even with this fellows code I have some reading in the USB documentation to do in order to know how to do what or what is happening. And use this as an opportunity to see if I can make USB work or if that is above my head. If I use a short USB cable to connect to those DIY style tacked on wires I hope that would still work. If you look at what the recommendations is for the USB tracks on a PCB board, there are some rather specific requirements in terms of routing the tracks to be equally long and present the same value of characteristic impedance of some certain amount IIRC but I guess those are only really required for data transfer of higher speeds.

 

I know in general how the USB protocol functions but the details of how to write a descriptor and such is another matter, and a project I have wanted to do needs USB so this might be a good idea.

 

I will return here to tell you if it worked out as hopped.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

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Is now a good moment to take a step back and weigh up the relative merits of Xmega versus Cortex I wonder?

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Microzod wrote:
SMD soldering is only fun, and removing this IC would be good practice since if I screw it up it isn't that big of a deal.
It's fun until you lift a pad (too much heat)

Could try ChipQuik and an inexpensive heat gun as either a PCB pre-heater or direct to heat the QFP; a soldering iron might be enough though a QFP-100 is large.

Microzod wrote:
The main reason is that all XMEGA A1U dev. boards I can find is more like 50-60USD(estimating, I think in terms of SEK, Swedish kronor), ...
That's about the price here, it's a little less in Europe, and inexpensive in China.

 


Chip Quik

Chip Quik

http://www.chipquik.com/store/index.php?cPath=200&osCsid=fn6i025s3q8mftp8iebparatf2

Chip Quik Alloy (10)

The Best Solution in Surface Mount Chip Removal!

MattairTech LLC

MattairTech

MT-X1S ATxmega128a1u USB development board

https://www.mattairtech.com/index.php/development-boards/mt-x1s-atxmega128a1-u-usb-development-board.html

ALVIDI SHOP

Alvidi Shop

with ATxmega

http://www.alvidi.de/shop/index.php?cat=c12_with-ATxmega.html

AliExpress

ATMEL ATxmega128A1U mini board, 12Bit ADC, 12Bit DAC, 8UART, USB 2.0 Full Speed Device, JTAG PDI, USB Bootloader preloaded

https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/ATMEL-ATxmega128A1U-mini-board-12Bit-ADC-12Bit-DAC-8UART-USB-2-0-Full-Speed-Device-JTAG/800571_1345195217.html?spm=2114.12010612.0.0.5f613f4657NDMP

via the Mcuzone store on AliExpress :

AliExpress

Store: Hangzhou ARMe Electronic Co., Ltd

https://www.aliexpress.com/store/800571?spm=2114.12010108.100004.2.149c5d86QxhTnm

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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An alternative approach to removing the chip is to use an xacto knife, (razor blade knife) to cut the pins adjacent the chip's body. Remove chip. Use soldering iron to clean up pads.
JC