Programming surface mount parts

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Hello, I sent this question to Atmel's online help. Instead of answering my question
they said I should post it here. Any help will be rewarded.

I am using the ATSTK to do programming on the AT90LS4433.
Right now I am using a DIP package, but would like to use
the surface mount in the future. I was wondering if there was a
way to program the surface mount chip with the
ATSTK100 board. An adapter of some sort was what I had in
mind. If there is not such an adapter, what is the recommended
procedure for using the surface mount parts?

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Hello Steve,

Please consult the list of third party adapter vendors from Atmel.

Best regards,

Morten, AVR tech. support, Atmel FAE

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Steve,
See my comments to Jon in the thread 3 below yours (Tiny15 in SMD-package).

Scott Pierskalla

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Steve,

Why don't you program the part serial? It needs only an MAX232 (or ST232), Transisitor and some extra C's and R's....that's all! See www.roesink.com for the hardware description and the free software loader (windows 98, ME and 95).

Greetings Robert

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What I do with a 20pin SSOP atmal package is
solder it down in its final resting spot
before programming. I bring a trace from
every pin to an edge of the board and I just
clip on an edge card to DIP connector
ribbon cable and plug the DIP end into the
programmer. Keep the ribbon short, and you
can use the programmer's crystal for clocking
during programming. By the way,
the first program dumped to every board is an
LED walk that traverses every I/O pin, which
highlights any solder bridges between pins
or pins that aren't stuck down to the pad.
Then I put the "real" program into the chip,
and solder on all the rest of the components.

Regards,
Scott

Regards,
Scott