PIC32 VGA

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YouTube

VGA driver for PIC32

Bruce Land (at Cornell University)

Published on Nov 29, 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgSOXxtIgHo (5m53s)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Great project.

 

I need an hour with the student to work on polishing their presentation skills.

 

JC

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"one bit monochrome" to match the one bit monotone... I stopped watching as I could not take it any longer.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I need an hour with the student to work on ... presentation skills.

Only an hour huh?  I was feeling a bit comforted; after all these days the engineers that get the press seem to be the ones that churn out well-presented videos, rather than merely well-written material as might have been the case "back in the day."

 

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I'm not really sure how much merit this sort of project has these days, when one can find so much well documented prior art on the net. A clone of "Breakout"? A game from 41 years ago, that didn't even have a microcontroller?

48MHz! The old Atari 2600 microcontroller ran at around 1MHz, if memory serves. OK, it had some extra hardware, but was still rendered a scan line at a time.

Quebracho seems to be the hardest wood.

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I'm not really sure how much merit this sort of project has these days...

Wow, tough crowd!

 

I liked the project.

Granted, it has been done before, but getting rock-solid (color) video has a few challenges that might not be readily apparent until one actually tries to do it.

 

I think the Breakout game was just an easy "app" for the purpose of showing casing the hardware.

 

(There implementation of Breakout needs a little work, btw, for their angle of reflection algorithm..., but that wasn't the purpose of the project)

 

A lot of the "project", I think, for that course, involves the write up of the project, (goal, approach, trade-offs, safety, schematics, BOM, etc.).

The working hardware is the flashy part of the project, and what one sees on YouTube, but is only part of the overall task at hand.

 

JC

 

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But the video isn't rock-solid, and you could, as I said, find pretty much everything done for you via a bit of Googling.

I've used the SPI hardware for video, as have many others. I also used to fix the original Breakout PCBs, and I've written code for the Atari 2600 and several other video game platforms. But I'm talking about more than 30 years ago(apart from the SPI for video bit...).

I don't want to put anyone down, but I just think there might be something a bit more innovative to do.

 

Quebracho seems to be the hardest wood.

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I just think there might be something a bit more innovative to do.

 Using the second DMA channel to control color is a pretty neat idea.  Certainly enough for a class project, and probably enough for an undergraduate "senior project."   We're not talking PhD theses here!

 

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Breakout, hmm, I was a baby when it came out, but I did play Arkanoid.

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El Tangas wrote:
I was a baby when it came out,
You mean you missed the joys of...:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

I remember a few years later my dad bringing home the first "Pong" machine. As an almost direct consequence I later spent 25 years working for a company making (initially) home computers.

Last Edited: Sat. Dec 2, 2017 - 12:27 PM
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Actually, my parents had a pong console (a clone, not an original - I can't find any pictures of that exact model...) that was still operational when I was a kid. So I do know that game :)

 

But you worked for Amstrad, right? The ZX Spectrum and related products from Sinclair, Amstrad and Timex were very popular in the 80s here in Portugal. These I know very well, that's were I learned to program (BASIC and Z80 assembly).

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When I die they will find "LDIR" engraved upon my heart.
.
(to misquote Elizabeth I)

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:-)

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I quite fancy this on my headstone...

DECLARE LIT LITERALLY 'LITERALLY':
DECLARE DEC LIT 'DECLARE' :
DEC BRIAN LIT 0:

'This forum helps those who help themselves.'

 

pragmatic  adjective dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical consideration.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I used to fix these:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

The monitor was a modified consumer TV chassis, with a light bulb to drop the voltage. The "logic board" was about 2 feet by one foot, and all 7400 TTL series(or equivalents).

 

I believe the guy I worked for was the first person to import and operate video games in the UK. That's what he said, anyway.

http://www.coin-opcommunity.co.u...

The story goes that he was a cab driver who picked up an American one day who was in the fledgeling video game business, and who bankrolled his UK startup.

He sold his 4 or 5 man company to a large Swedish company who had strong ties with Atari, as a result of which I got to go to the US and hang out with Nolan Bushnell and Al Alcorn.

Seems like a lifetime ago.

 

Quebracho seems to be the hardest wood.

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 8, 2017 - 08:44 AM