New Raspberry Pi 3 available!

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#1
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The new 64-bit RPi 3 is available from most suppliers. I've just ordered two from RS, they have about 22,000 left. It has built-in Wi_fi and BT.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Thanks!

Couldn't locate it here at Allied Electronics; will need patience.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-3-on-sale/

 

Adafruit is another supplier here; possible stock soon :

https://www.adafruit.com/pi3

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 2, 2016 - 02:20 AM
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Interesting to see what Dean Camera ("abcminiuser") had to say on Twitter about it: https://twitter.com/abcminiuser

 

OTOH my twin is one of the experts on the RPi forum and he just bought one as his 10th Raspberry Pi - so some people think it's good value! :-)

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I. must have about 10, but I bought 6 of one type when they were very scarce so that I could supply them to people who couldn't buy them.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Just ordered one for the fun of it ....

Just as a playtoy, and to see how much faster it is, compared to my old 1'Gen Raspi's

 

For performance im always going for Odroid.

Will use the new Odroid C2 (released in a week or so) as my new Multi-Vlan Linux firewall/router , that's serious ethernet performance for 40$

 

/Bingo

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 1, 2016 - 04:59 PM
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Bingo600 wrote:
Will use the new Odroid C2 (released in a week or so) as my new Multi-Vlan Linux firewall/router , that's serious ethernet performance for 40$

하드커널

ODROID

Hardkernel

ODROID-C2

http://www.hardkernel.com/main/products/prdt_info.php?g_code=G145457216438

...

* Amlogic ARM® Cortex®-A53(ARMv8) 2Ghz quad core CPUs 

...

 and more ARMv8 is either already here or arriving soon.


The Linux Foundation

Linux.com

Top 10 Best Linux and Android Hacker SBCs of 2015

by Eric Brown

16 December 2015 15:24

http://www.linux.com/news/embedded-mobile/mobile-linux/873718-top-10-best-linux-and-android-hacker-sbcs-of-2015

...

Here comes 64-bit

...

For this list, I chose the second 96Boards SBC, Qualcomm’s $75 quad-core, Cortex-A53 DragonBoard 410c.

This is the most powerful board on my top 10 list, although ...

...

In 2016, we can expect more 64-bit boards and at lower prices.

Earlier this month, a Kickstarter project launched for a 64-bit Pine A64 SBC that starts at just $15.

When it ships in Q2 2016 ...

...

Next year, I predict we’ll see at least one intriguing low-cost SBC based on the capable and fairly affordable, 14nm Intel Atom x5 (Cherry Trail).

...

Arrow.com

Embedded System Development Boards and Kits

DRAGONBOARD 410C by Arrow Development Tools

https://www.arrow.com/en/products/dragonboard410c/arrow-development-tools?utm_source=product-page&utm_medium=96boards&utm_term=organic&utm_content=dragonboard40c&utm_campaign=dragonboard410c-arrow

...

Operating Temp: 0°C to +70°C

...

linux-sunxi.org

Allwinner A64

http://linux-sunxi.org/A64

Olimex on Wordpress

A64-OLinuXino 64-bit ARM OSHW designed completely with KiCAD is live!

17 Feb 2016

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2016/02/17/a64-olinuxino-64-bit-arm-oshw-designed-completely-with-kicad-is-live/

...

... 1GB RAM (2GB is possible) and 4GB fast SLC eMMC Flash, with WiFi+BLE4.0 module.

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 2, 2016 - 03:14 AM
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gchapman wrote:

 

Next year, I predict we’ll see at least one intriguing low-cost SBC based on the capable and fairly affordable, 14nm Intel Atom x5 (Cherry Trail).

Do you mean we need to wait until 2017 ?

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Intel + Embedded? surprise Wonder how that is going for them? cheeky

 

(they've tried and tried to break into the embedded world over the years but they are stuck in a desktop/server mentality and can't seem to grasp the concept of low margin volume pricing)

 

Of course their recent mobile phones have really set the world alight.... oh, wait a minute....

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MinnowBoard max http://wiki.minnowboard.org/Minn...​ is a pretty good platform.  Just got my RPi3 so hope to have a play later. 

 

David

 

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clawson wrote:

Intel + Embedded? surprise Wonder how that is going for them? cheeky

 

(they've tried and tried to break into the embedded world over the years but they are stuck in a desktop/server mentality and can't seem to grasp the concept of low margin volume pricing)

 

Of course their recent mobile phones have really set the world alight.... oh, wait a minute....

 

Intel are certainly an interesting case.

They started in Embedded Devices, and their 8051 is still very widely used, with new silicon releases.

Intel still deploy the 8051 core inside their chipsets (but not as separate MCUs)

 

Even with all that, you are right that their FAB and corporate cost structures have rather run ahead of classic Embedded design

 

Most of the lowest cost MCUs out there, are made on processes Intel long since forgot about - but their cutting edge FABs are somewhat too high in leakage current for Low current ( or wider Vcc)

 

Perhaps they can get the die area low enough, on those new FABs, to get into the lower end MicroProcessor Space, even if generic Microcontrollers are now outside their scope.

 

As things like RaspPi 3 'grow upwards', maybe Intel can come down to meet that hardware ?

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Intel Edison is not a bad platform for IoT and embedded, it has wifi and BlueTooth on board too, and it's pretty small. It is Atom based I believe.

SpiderKenny
@spiderelectron
www.spider-e.com

 

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SpiderKenny wrote:

Intel Edison is not a bad platform for IoT and embedded, it has wifi and BlueTooth on board too, and it's pretty small. It is Atom based I believe.

True, I find this in stock :

 

Intel EDI2.SPON.AL.S Intel Edison SoC Module; Dual-core 500MHz Atom CPU; 100MHz Quark MCU;  $59.19

Dual-core, dual-threaded 500MHz Intel Atom CPU and 100MHz Intel Quark microcontroller
1GB LPDDR3 POP SDRAM (Dual channel 32-bit @ 800MT/sec)
4GB eMMC Flash memory
Broadcom 43340 802.11 a/b/g/n dual-band (2.4 and 5GHz) WiFi
Bluetooth 4.0
40 x configurable 1.8V GPIO
On-board antenna
Power supply: +3.3V to +4.5Vdc
Connector: 70-pin Hirose DF40 Series
Operating temperature range: 0 to +40°C
Dimensions: 35.5 x 25.0 x 3.9mm
Atom Operating System: Yocto Linux v1.6
Quark Operating System: RTOS

 

http://www.mouser.com/new/intel/...

 

 

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The new Intel Curie module seems interesting; they put an x86 and an ARC in a module that runs at 32MHz (pushing power way down.)  Includes BLE and some sensors, and is supposed to sell for ~$10 (which is less than some of the competing BLE modules, though those might be running faster.)  Available now as Arduino101; supposed to ship by itself sometime this quarter.  And it's one of the targets of the new Zepher RTOS...)

 

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westfw wrote:
The new Intel Curie module seems interesting; they put an x86 and an ARC in a module that runs at 32MHz (pushing power way down.)

I find these specs

  • Flash Memory: 196 kB
  • SRAM: 24 kB
  • Clock Speed: 32MHz

 

so the memory may be up on Ardunio, but that's very small for a Microprocessor.

"The Intel Curie module memory is shared between the two microcontrollers, so your sketch can use 196 kB out of 384 kB (flash memory) and 24 kB out of 80 kB (SRAM) "

 

 

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clawson wrote:
Intel + Embedded? surprise Wonder how that is going for them? cheeky
The local in-city industrial computer manufacturer specs those Intel embedded x86; use cases are machine control, machine vision, some automotive and all in the industrial temperature range.

AMD Embedded also has product into those same use cases and also for an IP router (fan-less).

P.S.

While browsing noticed that one of the machines has real-time Linux as an option.


EE Times

x86 SoC Series Spans Wide Application Range

by Rich Quinnell

3/1/2016 02:53 PM EST

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1329071

Nuremberg, Germany — At Embedded World last week chip maker Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) announced an expansion of its Embedded G-series systems on chip (SoCs) ...

...

... available in extended temperature versions for demanding industrial environments.

...

Devices in the "J" family target lower power operation than the I series at a slight reduction in performance.

... , these devices consume only 6w-10W.

...

... the new devices address the needs of product designs with long-term operating life.

...

... AMD's commitment to a planned 10-year product availability.

So developers can continue to use the familiar and popular x86 processor architecture for another decade without worrying about product obsolescence or end of life.

AMD

Embedded solutions from AMD

Embedded Developer Zone

http://developer.amd.com/resources/embedded-developer-zone/

Mentor Graphics

Mentor Graphics Expands Mentor Embedded Linux Support to the Third Generation AMD Embedded G-Series SoC

Wilsonville, Ore., Feb. 23, 2016

https://www.mentor.com/company/news/mentor-expands-embedded-linux-third-generation-amd-g-series-soc

Cogent Computer Systems

COM Express Type 10 Mini

http://www.cogcomp.com/com-express-type-10-mini.html

PC Engines Home

PC Engines apu2c4 product file

http://www.pcengines.ch/apu2c4.htm

Real-Time Linux Wiki

https://rt.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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If I read it right, the MinnowBoard Turbot variant has a temperature range of 0C to 40C then to 70C with a larger heatsink.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
The local in-city industrial computer manufacturer specs those Intel embedded x86; use cases are machine control, machine vision, some automotive and all in the industrial temperature range. AMD Embedded also has product into those same use cases and also for an IP router (fan-less).

I'm not talking about "niche" applications. For example I was responsible for an Intel Atom board being designed into a media display device that made something like 20,000 units because in the days before the likes of Rpi it was possibly the cheapest way to make a Linux based design. But that is not "volume" embedded.

 

No I'm talking about true embedded in volume. The 10 million microwaves that Panasonic make. Or the 20 million washing machines that Zanussi makes. Or the 100 million mobile phones that Apple makes. Or the 5 million vehicle ECUs that Audi/VW make. How many of those are tempted to put "Intel Inside"?

 

When you can buy a washing machine or microwave chip for $1 or a mobile/car chip for $10 why would anyone in their right mind pay $20..$50 to someone like Intel for their silicon?

 

They have made attempts to make $5..$10 chips and the Atom is as close as they get. But they just don't really have the idea because an Atom might be in the right price ball park but where are the 4 UARTs, 8 timers, 3 SPIs, 4 I2Cs, ... that low or mid range embedded CPUs are expected to have? To use a Pentium style processor from Intel you end up having to put in "NorthBridge" or whatever it is called this week. (and you probably still end up going to Winbond or someone to get the "IO mop up" chip anyway).

 

If they were serious about embedded they develop a core like MIPS or ARM and then invite 3rd party silicon vendors to group their favourite peripherals around such cores (very much in the ARM mould of things).

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clawson wrote:
When you can buy a washing machine or microwave chip for $1 or a mobile/car chip for $10 why would anyone in their right mind pay $20..$50 to someone like Intel for their silicon?

You are absolutely right.

However I suspect Intel is run by bean counters who cannot understand the most basic principle that if you sell more (qty) then you make more ($$$).

Every beancounter I have ever come across has raised margins to (attempt to) increase profit instead of lowering margins to increase quantity to increase profit.

 

Ironically, Apple has some fabulous ARM based embedded processors/SOCs, but do you think anyone else would be allowed to use them? No chance!

SpiderKenny
@spiderelectron
www.spider-e.com

 

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Also, it won't be long before Apple desktops PCs ditch intel and start using their own ARM chips. I'd bet on it.

Unless of course some Intel lawyer managed to author some iron clad contract way back when Apple ditched the G5 and moved all their desktops to Intel.

 

When I worked at <name of famous PC manufacturer redacted> we could buy Intel Pentium chips for peanuts - but ONLY if we stuck a tacky "Intel Inside" sticker on every machine. We had to buy the stickers from intel too.

If we didn't buy the same number of stickers as processors then "strange" anomalies would appear in the shipping dates and availability. If I remember correctly there was some court cases about it at some time.

 

Gratuitous shot of an Intel product:

SpiderKenny
@spiderelectron
www.spider-e.com

 

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 3, 2016 - 01:01 PM
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My new RPis arrived from RS on Tuesday. I've just got round to putting the latest NOOBS on a uSD and it is busy installing the latest Raspbian version. I'll have a play with it in a few minutes.

It works OK. Booting seems very fast.

Leon Heller G1HSM

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 3, 2016 - 04:16 PM
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Both work OK. Internet works OK using Wi-Fi to router.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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clawson wrote:

No I'm talking about true embedded in volume. The 10 million microwaves that Panasonic make. Or the 20 million washing machines that Zanussi makes. Or the 100 million mobile phones that Apple makes. Or the 5 million vehicle ECUs that Audi/VW make. How many of those are tempted to put "Intel Inside"?

 

When you can buy a washing machine or microwave chip for $1 or a mobile/car chip for $10 why would anyone in their right mind pay $20..$50 to someone like Intel for their silicon?

 

With the 8048/8748/8751/87196 etc, Intel was a large player in the embedded space once, but imagine you have X^Y square feet of FAB space, and you have a choice of making 100 million die with a selling price of $50, or $1.50, which one will you choose ?

 

Intel still use their embedded cores internally, but they got out of the embedded space because they had the luxury of being able to.

The 8051 is still the most widely sourced 8 bit MCU on the planet, and the 1 Clock modern versions, lead that space in Price/Performance.

A lot of  Asian vendors have 8051 on their line cards too - so yes, Microwaves will have an Intel Core inside :)

 

What has happened since, is one sector of Embedded space has grown upwards, to leave Microcontrollers behind, and use Microprocessors.

That suits Intel again - but like the 800lb gorilla they are, their response time is not great....

 

Raspberry Pi I would say, is harming high end Microcontroller sales.

That $5 Pi Zero is under the price of a good many bigger MCUs.

 

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Who-me wrote:
With the 8048/8748/8751/87196 etc, Intel was a large player in the embedded space once, but imagine you have X^Y square feet of FAB space, and you have a choice of making 100 million die with a selling price of $50, or $1.50, which one will you choose ?

True that. But where Intel and Microsoft appear to have failed is recognising the direction in which the world was heading. There was a time when the vast majority of all computing being done on planet Earth was being done using Wintel boxes. Now most people have more computing in their trouser pocket and the chances are what they are carrying round is some kind of RISC processor running a non-Microsoft OS. Both companies failed to see that coming big time! Too busy resting on their laurels I guess?

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Intel won't be going bust soon - there's still a huuuge market for servers to provide the magic backend for all those mobile devices. Recently Dell acquired EMC, so i dare say they know where their market is heading.
The paradigm shift in the server space might be something like each hard drive running linux with a low power medium grunt cpu like an ARM 64 bit. Given the form factor of a HD, poking some extra chips onto the board might add $10 for a 1G quad core and 2GB ram. All we need is the infrastructure to handle a more parallel solution and a high speed network interconnect. If this happens, the drive manufacturers become king. Buy shares in seagate and wd now!

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 3, 2016 - 10:14 PM
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leon_heller wrote:
I've just got round to putting the latest NOOBS on a uSD and it is busy installing the latest Raspbian version.

Memory content from Electronic Design

Raspberry Pi Gets USB Hard-Disk Drive

by

Mar 18, 2016

http://electronicdesign.com/memory/raspberry-pi-gets-usb-hard-disk-drive

...

The new drive is called the WD PiDrive and it is available in kit form ... that includes cables and an enclosure.

...

... 314 Gbyte ...

...

External USB hard drives are very common, but internal USBs are not.

...

Raspberry Pi and module developers also have access to other flash-drive solutions, but hard drives still offer more capacity at a lower price point.

...

"Tried interfacing an external HD to it because SD cards tend to die easy ..." - justinmamaradlo

...

"This includes a regular PC so it is possible to copy information from a PC to the drive and then plug it back into the Raspberry Pi." - Bill Wong

WDLabs

WD PiDrive 314GB

http://wdlabs.wd.com/products/wd-pidrive-314gb/

Western Digital US Online Store

WDLabs Products

http://store.wdc.com/store/wdus/en_US/list/ThemeID.21986300/parentCategoryID.13092600/categoryID.70262300/Accessories/WDLabs_Products

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 28, 2016 - 06:39 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Kartman wrote:
The paradigm shift in the server space might be something like each hard drive running linux with a low power medium grunt cpu like an ARM 64 bit.
Linaro specs a small (160mm * 120mm) ARMv8-A board in its 96Boards Enterprise Edition with a 64MB boot flash (at least, maybe secure boot) that typically have SATA connectors.

96Boards Specifications

http://www.96boards.org/specifications/

The Linux Foundation

96Boards Gains New SBCs, But Is Pressured by Rasp Pi 3

by Eric Brown

Friday, 11 March 2016 00:00

http://www.linux.com/news/embedded-mobile/mobile-linux/891763-96boards-gains-new-sbcs-but-is-pressured-by-rasp-pi-3

...

... 96Boards.org announced a major Reference Software Platform 16.03 release, which for the first time produces a common and unified kernel tree based on Linux 4.4.0 that can be shared across all supported platforms.

...

LeMaker Cello

This week, the first 96Boards SBC using the larger, server-oriented Enterprise Edition (EE) spec appeared, but it was not the expected AMD HuskyBoard.

...

The delayed AMD HuskyBoard was demo’d this week at Linaro Connect Bangkok.

The board was running the developer preview of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 7.2. 

...

Pi 3, Odroid-C2 Add Pricing Pressure

...

Fortunately for Linaro, it’s not so much going head to head with the Pi as it is trying to duplicate the Pi open source ecosystem on the high end, appealing more to traditional embedded vendors than hobbyist hackers.

Many vendors are attracted to the onboard wireless, 40- and 60-pin connectors, and stackable add-on board design, which provide more expansion possibilities than does the Pi.

Some of these vendors are new to open source and feel more comfortable with the approval and promised stability of ARM and other big semi vendors behind Linaro, which is known for its well-maintained Ubuntu and Android distributions and middleware.

...

While there’s really no competition for 96Boards EE in the ARM server and high-end embedded space, 96Boards CE may struggle to find a niche above the Raspberry Pi, Odroid, and others.

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Just finished building Atmel-3.5.1 toolchain on the new R3

 

4Hr's on the Rv3 , and 20+ Hr's on the old Rv1

GMP needs some persuation with the Atmel buildscript , else it "barf's"

 

/Bingo

OK
Finished at Tue Mar 29 01:40:04 CEST 2016
Task completed in 4 hours, 4 minutes and 7 seconds.
root@raspi-4:/home/bingo/Atmel-3.5.1/builddir#
root@raspi-4:/home/bingo/Atmel-3.5.1/builddir#

 

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 29, 2016 - 12:25 PM
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Another small SoM though no stock yet* :

Raspberry Pi CM3 from Allied Electronics

http://www.alliedelec.com/lp/170124/raspberry-pi/

...

... The CM3 is already being used in the next-generation, large-format displays from NEC.

...

* https://octopart.com/search?q=CM3+Raspberry

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/CM3/1690-1016-ND/6605499

From the datasheet (CM1, CM3, CM3 Lite) at Digi-Key :

  • -25C to 80C
  • EOL on or after 2023-Jan
  • Significant external power supplies with required sequencing

 

The follow-on to Intel Edison is Intel Joule :

Intel® Software

The Intel® Joule™ Compute Module

https://software.intel.com/en-us/iot/hardware/joule

 

Edit : Digi-Key

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 31, 2017 - 01:11 AM
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The follow-on to Intel Edison is Intel Joule :

 Electronic Design

Electronic Design

Intel To Amputate Three Modules For Internet Of Things, Including Joule

by James Morra 1

Jun 20, 2017

http://www.electronicdesign.com/embedded-revolution/intel-amputate-three-modules-internet-things-including-joule

...

Intel revealed plans to end the Edison, Galileo, and Joule compute modules, exposing yet again how it had bowed and warped under years of pressure from ARM, ...

...

... the last of the modules will be sold by the end of the year.

...

The module [Joule] impressed with its four computing cores and compatibility with Intel's RealSense three-dimensional camera, but Intel hit stumbling blocks almost immediately. Sales were barred in Taiwan, China, Japan, and other companies as the device awaited certification.

...

Intel still has grand ambitions for its Internet of Things business, though.

...

In August, Intel will release its new Compute Card, which contains storage, memory, and wireless connectivity in a "mini P.C." module slightly bigger than a credit card.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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they're a bit late to the party, then!