microchipDIRECT, free shipping Tiny817 Xplained Mini

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The following arrived early afternoon today :

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The tiny817 series of MCUs marks the beginning of a new era in AVR Microcontrollers. They combine the efficiency of an efficient 8-bit CPU with autonomous peripherals designed to increase throughput while further reducing power consumption and system latency.

For a limited time, we are offering the ATtiny817 Xplained Mini development board with FREE shipping at Microchip Direct! Please use coupon code FREESHP817 at checkout.

...

The duration of that coupon code is unknown to me.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Total votes: 0

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Total votes: 0

I tried to order one of these and after a long, slow process, I got a message saying that my order was rejected for "export restrictions".  I'm in the USA, so I don't know what's going on with their ordering system.

 

I think that I'll simply stick to the mega328P found on Arduino Nano boards,  and the Tiny85 for applications that need very small physical spacings and low cost.

 

If they want to sell a lot of these, then they should mate them with a CH340G USB-serial IC, a bootloader, and a cheap (about $1.50 USD max) breakout board.  And then write the code that integrates them into the Arduino framework. 

 

Microprocessor companies tend to overestimate the value of proprietary development/debug tools focused on embedded-system engineers, and underestimate the growing importance of free, easy-to-use, wiki-supported development/training tools like Arduino that focus on technician/hobbyist applications.  I suspect that in the future there will be more small scale (100 or so units of a design) development by non-engineers needing to solve a specialized problem or application, rather than 10000+ unit "design wins" that require highly-trained, specialized, and expensive engineering-level support and development staffs.  For that reason, I suggest that Microchip develop a process for integrating all their embed-sys products into the Arduino framework.