LOW cost WiFi?

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I have an AVR tiny chip application to control a motor. Now I'd like to step it up to add WiFi connectivity/remote control (on/off, fwd, rev, speed, etc)...(quantity 2500). I don't need any measurable data capacity (though wifi doen't have a "slow" mode). Is there something in the $5-$10(max) range? I see a lot of modules in the $20 range, but that's too much.

Bluetooth is not a desired connectivity option (though I see the prices are nice and low)

I realize its somewhat ridiculous to expect to get a full-fledge GHz transceiver & high speed data access for this price, but I also remember when GPS was a $1200 option.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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You might be able to use the InfraRed signals of standard television remote controllers. The IR receivers for standards like RC-5 are cheap, reliable, and easy to use. You would only need to decode a few of the buttons for the five options listed: on/off toggle, frd/rev toggle, speed up, speed down, etc.

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Thanks Simonetta,

That's a good suggestion you make, but this needs to ultimately be controlled & monitored through the internet (web).

I'd use some cheapo ASK rf module, but then it wouldn't be internet accessible.

I did find this interesting...wonder what the 2500 quantity cost would be (and if this module is any good)

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Low-cost-WIFI-module/1873368127.html?s=p

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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avrcandies wrote:
Bluetooth is not a desired connectivity option (though I see the prices are nice and low)
An example of that is RFduino BLE SMT (RF Digital).
Look-up a large quantity price; close to your requirement.
Might port all or most of the app from the AVR to that module's MCU then add motor control electronics; total price and/or cost may still be acceptable.
Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) / Bluetooth Smart / Bluetooth (BT) 4 -
Its range may not be acceptable; one BT chipset manufacturer, maybe more, are adding mesh networking to BT 4 to solve that problem.
A work around is to move the BT 4 central role device within range of a set of BT 4 peripheral role devices and rescan.
Or, network a set of BT 4 central role devices.
avrcandies wrote:
I realize its somewhat ridiculous to expect to get a full-fledge GHz transceiver & high speed data access for this price, ...
Not ridiculous for there is, or soon will be, enough demand to drive the price down.
WifiDuino for the Internet of Things

 (Atmel on Wordpress)
Atmel teams up with industry leaders to form IoT group (Atmel on Wordpress)

Your application is a better fit for WPAN instead of WLAN or Bluetooth Smart (low data rate, mesh networking for range, price).
Port to another AVR (AVR plus integrated WPAN transceiver); create or purchase a gateway to LAN/WLAN.
WPAN gateways already exist off-the-shelf.
Atmel and third parties state how to create a gateway.
Atmel's gateway application note is WPAN to LAN.
A third party's gateway is WPAN to router via a router's USB port (iow by a USB dongle).

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Quote:
Atmel teams up with industry leaders to form IoT group (Atmel on Wordpress)

This looks interesting, however, any notes about the pricing?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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Ideally, zero.
'"Atmel is excited about our participation in OIC to establish an open source framework that goes beyond the digital home and supports services for multiple verticals including consumer, industrial and automotive markets,” said Kaivan Karimi, Vice President and General Manager of Wireless MCUs at Atmel Corporation.'
I'm assuming an open source stack attached to Atmel Studio, and Atmel will use hardware sales revenue to support OIC.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I would not bother with anything with Atmel and WiFi for now.

Try this maybe:
http://www.alibaba.com/product-d...

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Thanks Jim--This looks great! I'm going to contact the supplier for quantity pricing & if it will be a long time to get one shipped for eval, I'll run down to Radio Shack to see if they stock it.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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I am looking at the Texas Instruments CC3100 series...has a lot of features. The price is not as good as Chinese imports (though it probably comes from China anyway), but it's available "now".

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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Quote:
Texas Instruments CC3100
and depending on what you read it is not easy to work with either.

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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My soldering iron will make it talk!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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avrcandies wrote:
Is there something in the $5-$10(max) range?
Yes for quantity 1 and less for larger quantities.
New UART to WIFI chipset will unleash low cost Internet of Things by OLIMEX on Wordpress (28 Aug 2014)
mentions this module:
WiFi Serial Transceiver Module w/ ESP8266 (Seeed Studio)
7USD/one
Using this WiFi SoC: ESP8266 (Espressif)
Browse the comments to Olimex's post to get URLs for the translated datasheet, translated AT commands, and the SDK.
Wouldn't be surprised if there's already an Arduino library for that module.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Now we're talking(WiFi, that is)!
Thanks for posting this awesome news. :D

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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Seeed appears to be sold out. AliExpress has a number of listings, but at this point too scary for me. http://www.danviews.com/facts-ab... scan through the comments...

So I purchased the only offering on eBay (at least as of today ;) ). http://www.ebay.com/itm/5PCS-LOT... I had to pay a bit more, but at least I should not have a horror story.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
... but at this point too scary for me.
Olimex may be along soon and Olimex may give some of their's in exchange for some software one creates.
Alternate manufacturer and vendor are in this thread:
What we know so far (ESP8266 Community Forum)
Looks like a number of configurations; some of these may be a better fit/form/function (less height, more functionality, etc.)
theusch wrote:
... but at least I should not have a horror story.
I guess some distributors would either hire a broker or use escrow for risk reduction.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Damn! Will not ship to Australia. I'll be in Shenzhen in a few weeks, so hopefully the situation has freed up a little by then. I'd been following another similar chip by Mediatech , when i stumbled on this one at Seeed and now there's heaps of interest in them. It looks like it might get some traction in the hobbyist community.

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Quote:

Looks like a number of configurations

On AliExpress I saw at least one other offering with the chip set, with an antenna connection.

All merely a curiosity for any real work, at least in the US, as these modules are not FCC licensed. And even if they would happen to pass the tests we couldn't afford to amortize the certification cost over low volume.

Similarly for LOW cost, it is again a curiosity for real work. Put a $5 module into your device. Sell 1000. $10000 certification cost adds $10 per unit.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
AliExpress has a number of listings, but at this point too scary for me.
Kartman wrote:
Damn! Will not ship to Australia. I'll be in Shenzhen in a few weeks, ...
Free shipping ESP8266 serial WIFI industry milepost unbeatable price deep Mingyang Electronic (AliExpress)
by a comment on the Olimex post on Wordpress.
Australia is listed for one customer on page 2 of Transaction History (Product Details tab, near page bottom).
Some are jumping into the water ;-)

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Quote:
Similarly for LOW cost, it is again a curiosity for real work. Put a $5 module into your device. Sell 1000. $10000 certification cost adds $10 per unit.

Well, theoretically if it's something you are selling commercially containing a processor (potential RF source), it should be tested anyhow--so there is cost regardless. But if it's for your own use, just wrap it up in a wad of tinfoil and nobody will care (but then so much for your WiFi).

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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Maybe there should be a different thread to discuss aliexpress?

In the meantime, I made a purchase through them. Their escrow statement at that time said they would refund your money if the product wasn't delivered in 60 days. I started trying to get resolution from the vendor at 45 days to no avail. 60 days passed and aliexpress began blithely ignoring me. I hounded them weekly and got nothing. Then sometime after 90 days the product arrived, followed shortly be a request for a positive review. I'm still stunned that the product actually arrived. 30 days from China I can believe, but 90?

I do a lot of business through ebay, only with vendors with more than 10000 good reviews, and I have never had a problem. It will be a while before I try aliexpress again.

Smiley

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After looking at the thread from the beginning there is only mention that "an AVR" is being used and there is nothing on actual implementation, so I agree with smiley and will move this to General Electronics with a copy still here.

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Another distributor:
ESP8266 WI07c Wifi Module (Electrodragon, Shenzhen)
Payment methods are by PayPal UK and Skrill (UK).
Using Arduino as serial port monitor (Electrodragon, wiki, Wi07c)
Found via EEVblog Forum, "Wifi Serial module for under $4 - You cant be Serious!" by boz (New Zealand).

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
Another distributor:
ESP8266 WI07c Wifi Module (Electrodragon, Shenzhen)
Payment methods are by PayPal UK and Skrill (UK).
Using Arduino as serial port monitor (Electrodragon, wiki, Wi07c)
Found via EEVblog Forum, "Wifi Serial module for under $4 - You cant be Serious!" by boz (New Zealand).

$4.5 :shock: :shock: :shock:
Did someone try it? I'm impress about the price...

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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WiFi Serial Transceiver Module (Seeed Studio, wiki)
is an example of an HTTP GET how to for an Arduino Uno with a note about Arduino Mega.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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From HackADay.com:

Quote:

There’s a catch, right, there’s always a catch. Yep. About two hours after this post is published it will be the number one English language Google result for “ESP8266.” As far as the English-speaking world is concerned, there is absolutely nothing to be found anywhere on the Internet on this module.

Seeed Studio recently sold a few of these modules for $7 and has some documentation, including a full datasheet and an AT command set. All the documentation is in Chinese. There’s also an “ESP8266 IoT SDK”, but from a quick glance at the code, this appears to be an SDK for the SOC on the module, not a simple way to connect the module to a microcontroller.

See http://hackaday.com/2014/08/26/n...

274,207,281-1 The largest known Mersenne Prime

Measure twice, cry, go back to the hardware store

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ESP8266 WIFI chips and modules arrived by Olimex on Wordpress (08 Sep 2014)

From there to Tutorial for ESP8266 Serial WiFi Module for use with an Arduino Uno clone.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Sep 10, 2014 - 02:49 PM
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I've ordered some from electrodragon - we'll see how quickly the ship.

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Aliexpress says mine left on 15 September. Let's see how long...

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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theusch wrote:
$10000 certification cost adds $10 per unit.
The following message states that US problem and one possible way of overcoming that; proceed to the next message for a hint on how to reduce the US price.

http://www.esp8266.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=128#p699 in thread "Few new module designs".

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Kartman wrote:

I've ordered some from electrodragon - we'll see how quickly the ship.

Electrodragon updated their design with 3 new signals to do restart and firmware update and new firmware (double the baud rate).

Appears a 3.3V FTDI USB can power and interface to this ESP8266 board.

http://www.electrodragon.com/w/Wi07c#Pin_Wiring_.28V090.29

  • Current firmware V091 for all stock, new reserved reset and CH_PD (for updating) pins available, you can refresh the firmware now.
  • All using new ESP8266ex new chip, old chip is not available anymore.

http://www.electrodragon.com/product/esp8266-wi07c-wifi-module/

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Sep 19, 2014 - 10:25 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I received my esp8266 boards from electrodragon on wednesday. I got one going last night - seems i got the new models where you have to tie the powerdown pin high and use 115200 baudrate. They basically do what they say but i think we're still a bit bleeding edge with the firmware - a few small things need to be added like dhcp or at least the means to do it. I've had my ipad connect to it but i had to type in the ip address. I've also had it connect to my router.

the instructions aren't entirely clear but a few people have posted info.

 

I'd give them 8/10 at the moment.

 

mind you, for a few more dollars you get a whole lot more if you go for the wireless routers - nothing like having a large slab of ram, linux and a real webserver. I see little boards for around $10 or so on Aliexpress. Once you start playing around with web servers, you start needing ram - the get request from the ipad is 230 bytes. So you need some reasonable buffers or a means of coping with large data (in AVR terms).

 

here's a challenge for Ralph - see what you can do with one of these and a tiny85,

 

ross, if you're champing at the bit (sic), you can grab one of mine.

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Thanks for the review.

Kartman wrote:
mind you, for a few more dollars you get a whole lot more if you go for the wireless routers - ...
May you share your thoughts on WRTNode?

WRTnode Opened for $25

http://wrtnode.com

Reason for asking is WRTnode appears to compete with Carambola 2.

http://8devices.com/carambola-2

Kartman wrote:
Once you start playing around with web servers, you start needing ram ...
Some of the off-the-shelf embedded Wi-Fi modules are SoC of a Cortex-M3 with baseband; these have significant internal SRAM and run a webserver.

Kartman wrote:
... the get request from the ipad is 230 bytes.
An alternative is Google protobuf on TCP/IP though that's not as integrated as HTTP.

http://m.eet.com/media/1119361/ubme_esd1011.pdf (Embedded Systems Design, October 2011, 4.4MB, go to page 9 and "A cheaper way to The Cloud")

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 25, 2014 - 02:57 AM
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Kartman wrote:

mind you, for a few more dollars you get a whole lot more if you go for the wireless routers - nothing like having a large slab of ram, linux and a real webserver. I see little boards for around $10 or so on Aliexpress. Once you start playing around with web servers, you start needing ram - the get request from the ipad is 230 bytes. So you need some reasonable buffers or a means of coping with large data (in AVR terms).

 

here's a challenge for Ralph - see what you can do with one of these and a tiny85,

 

I've been planning to get one of those $10 RJ-45/wifi routers as well.  A cheap router running linux/OpenWRT + a BTLE USB dongle is what I think is the best bet for an IoT (sorry for the over-used buzzword) gateway.

Someone's already done the heavy lifting:

https://github.com/solarkennedy/...

 

The idea would be to have the gateway be able to log to data.sparkfun.com or to google spreadsheets using rest.

 

The esp8266 modules do look interesting, and at under $7 for a pair the price is not bad, but doesn't come close to the cost of a nrf module and attiny with a c2032 coin cell (< $1.50 per node).

 

Once people have gcc working to compile code for those modules I'd be more inclined to try them out.

 

 

 

 

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

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gchapman wrote:

 

Kartman wrote:

mind you, for a few more dollars you get a whole lot more if you go for the wireless routers - ...

May you share your thoughts on WRTNode?

 

WRTnode Opened for $25

http://wrtnode.com

$25 without an enclosure and no rj45 is a no go compared to the $10 routers Kartman is talking about:

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/W...

 

I'm guessing they are based on the  Ralink RT3050F which is supported by openWRT.

 

http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/asus...

 

Quote:

An alternative is Google protobuf on TCP/IP though that's not as integrated as HTTP.

 

The problem is to publish anything to the internet you pretty much need https and enough string processing resources to do rest or json.  If there's any free online service supporting google protocol buffers, that would be great.  Even better would be Cap'N Proto.

http://kentonv.github.io/capnproto/

 

 

 

I have no special talents.  I am only passionately curious. - Albert Einstein

 

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Gchapman - i hadn't heard of the wrtnode. The Carambola has 64MB ram which is quite useful along with 16MB flash that gives you a bit of space to load some apps and/or webpages. The wrtnode has 512Mb ram which translates to 64MB along with the same flash. Don't expect to run Joomla on these things! A raspi or BBB these are not. Things like mbusd (modbus gateway) and ser2net (serial to tcp) run fine. Small setups of asterisk (voip server) seem to run as well. This spec is the same as the arduino Yun.

another thing to note - whilst the clock rates are high, they only have a 16bit bus to the ram so that hobbles them a bit. You definitely can't compare them to a x86 with 64 or 128 bit memory busses!

 

As Ralphd mentions, to do 'proper' web stuff, you do a lot of string stuff - JSON encode/decode. Under linux, languages like Lua make this trivial vs bare metal embedded with k's of ram where it becomes a challenge. The other thing to consider is the javascript libraries one might use to do your pages can chew up a few MB if you store them locally.

 

 

 

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I use NRF24L01. Costs < $1 (4pc for 2.6gbp on ebay). Although not real "wifi" but great for remote control applications.

LibK - device driver support for flash based microcontrollers: GitHub project

http://oskit.se - join me on my quest to become a better programmer

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In my previous post I mentioned there was no DHCP - seems I didn't wait long enough. There is DHCP and it works with the iPad and iPhone - I didn't try it with my Nexus 7 as its battery life sucks (always has). It also looks like it can support a number (probably 4) concurrent connections. I've only tried two.

So much fun for so little dollars!

 

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I think this thread is about IP networking.

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Atmel Expands World-class Wireless Portfolio With 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi SoCs and Modules

SAN JOSE, CA, Sept. 22, 2014

http://www.atmel.com/about/news/release.aspx?reference=tcm:26-63348

Both wireless solutions are compatible to existing Atmel MCU solutions and can connect to any Atmel AVR® or ...

SmartConnect solutions accelerate development time for cost-effective, battery-operated applications in the residential, healthcare, industrial, smart energy and wearable markets.

http://www.atmel.com/devices/ATWILC1000.aspx 

http://www.atmel.com/devices/ATWINC1500.aspx

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Sep 25, 2014 - 02:47 AM
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Appears the baud rate has increased for some ESP8266 modules.

ElectroDragon, Wi07c, wiki

  • Support to change baudrate, default baudrate is 9600, AT command is ...

http://www.electrodragon.com/w/Wi07c#V0.922

Some ESP8266 modules can have code uploaded to the module:

NURDspace, ESP8266

Uploading code

https://nurdspace.nl/ESP8266#Uploading_code

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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ATWILC1000 now has a datasheet for the Atmel module ATWILC1000-MR110P.

Home > Products > Wireless Connectivity > Wi-Fi > SmartConnect

ATWILC1000

http://www.atmel.com/devices/ATWILC1000.aspx

Ordering code       Package  Description
ATWILC1000-MR110PA 22 X 15mm Certified module with ATWINC1500A-Mu chip and PCB antenna

Typo frown

Current consumption is in the SoC datasheet.

No stock yet but the module is appearing in some distributor's catalogs (quantity 1 : Avnet 12USD, Digi-Key 17USD; quantitiy 1000 is approx. 11USD each).

http://www.findchips.com/search/ATWILC1000

An assumption is ATWILC1000 software will be in Atmel Studio Gallery.

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Nov 3, 2014 - 07:27 PM
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 This press release contains a number of interesting topics:

Home > About Atmel > Press Room

Releases

Atmel Unveils Innovative Solutions Powering the Internet of Things at Electronica 2014

San Jose, CA, November 3, 2014

http://www.atmel.com/about/news/release.aspx?reference=tcm:26-64165

... at Electronica 2014 held in Munich, Germany, November 11-14. Atmel is also showcasing a number of IoT solutions in its booth located in Hall A5, Booth 542.

...

  • Secure Connectivity
    • Industry's first FCC-certified Wi-Fi and MCU integrated module

...

  • Atmel's SMART HOME ZONE brings more intelligent, connected devices together.
  • Showcasing hardware security with wireless connectivity to a variety of edge nodes applications, the well-received Atmel WINC1500 will demonstrate a video camera, temperature sensor and LED control highlighting ease-of-use connectivity to mobile handsets and cloud architecture. Strong key protection is provided by the ATEC108 Elliptic Curve security chip.

...

  • Atmel's MAKER ZONE showcases IoT inventions, enabling unlimited possibilities.
  • Being at the core of the Maker Movement, Atmel will be showcasing a number of Maker demonstrations including a remote-controlled Maker Robot powered by the Atmel | SMART SAM D21. "Mr. Abot" will be controlled through an Andriod app and the communications will be driven through Atmel's recently announced new WINC1500 Wi-Fi solution.

...

Some distributors have the ATWILC1000 module in their catalogs though no stock yet; price is about 11USD each for 1000.

http://www.findchips.com/search/ATWILC1000-MR110PA

Atmel

Home > Products > Wireless Connectivity > Wi-Fi > SmartConnect

ATWILC1000

http://www.atmel.com/devices/ATWILC1000.aspx

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Nov 3, 2014 - 07:32 PM
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Kartman wrote:
As Ralphd mentions, to do 'proper' web stuff, you do a lot of string stuff - JSON encode/decode.
The following mentions JSON :

element14

Community

All Places > Internet of Things > Blog > 2014 > November > 19

Internet of Things

ESP8266 Wi-Fi + Arduino upload to Xively

http://www.element14.com/community/groups/internet-of-things/blog/2014/11/19/esp8266-wi-fi-arduino-upload-to-xively

...

Some links:

...

ESP8266 control from a PC via USB-serial

...

Firmware update

...

ESP8266 + Arduino + Xively upload

...

  • Code for Arduino 1.02 is attached at the end of this blogpost. 

...

Major time consuming thing with Xively is that it is difficult to prepare json data for upload. One needs to insert data in special places into json and count the length of message.

...

In the above is a link to a 400m range test of an ESP8266 module.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I wonder if anyone has tested the module for ETSI/FCC compliance?  I'll have to update myself with the latest state of the firmware - the early ones were a bit dodgy.

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ETSI/FCC & ESP8266 modules - might be along but haven't searched for the word on that.

ETSI/FCC & Atmel ATWINC1500 module - it's compliant but no stock yet; one distributor has it in catalog at about 15USD/one and about 13USD/1 for 1000.

ESP8266 module firmware - the element14 link has a file named 'V0925.zip'; copied, unzip'd, looks like firmware.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Nov 20, 2014 - 06:48 AM
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ralphd wrote:
Once people have gcc working to compile code for those modules I'd be more inclined to try them out.

GitHub

/esp8266-wiki

Toolchain

https://github.com/esp8266/esp8266-wiki/wiki/Toolchain

IIRC from an incidental search (very cursory), this toolchain is functional.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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You can use a cheap radio and then build a "router" that converts your cheap radio signals into UDP packets which it dumps into the ethernet. AES encrypted of course. This can be implemented with an arduino and enc28j60 chip and any cheap radio. The benefit is that you can go as low power and low cost as you want for your nodes - pick any radio you like, then have it send it's packets to the module connected to ethernet. Then interact with your cheap devices from the computer, through this router using standard ip sockets (udp).

LibK - device driver support for flash based microcontrollers: GitHub project

http://oskit.se - join me on my quest to become a better programmer

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mkscheder -  what you propose is a common solution. Having direct connection via these cheap wifi modules is significantly easier. As for power consumption - that might be debatable. There seems to be a push for low power wifi but how it compares to bluetooth le etc, i'm not sure.

 

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mkschreder wrote:
You can use a cheap radio and then build a "router" that converts your cheap radio signals into UDP packets ...
Seeed Studio has such implemented by a MIPS WiFi SoC and OpenWrt with connectors for an Arduino shield.

Seeed Studio

Dragrove - Generic gateway for internet of things

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/Dragrove-Generic-gateway-for-internet-of-things-p-1118.html

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Kartman wrote:
There seems to be a push for low power wifi but how it compares to bluetooth le etc, i'm not sure.
WiFi modules and Bluetooth 2 modules are somewhat comparable (speed, power consumption) except for connectivity; Bluetooth 2 is IIRC 7 devices max to 1 host.

Bluetooth 4 (Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy) is designed for coin cells but its speed is about 1/10 of Bluetooth 2; same connectivity as Bluetooth 2.

802.15.4 is likewise for coin cells, similar speed to Bluetooth 4, but with much greater connectivity (WPAN) though less range than most WLAN.

There are off-the-shelf 802.15.4 bridges or gateways; for roll-your-own, Atmel has an application note for a 802.15.4 gateway.

There are 802.15.4 USB dongles (SAM3 plus Atmel transceiver); these can be used with a router, laptop, or tablet.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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