Intel Edison

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Is the Intel Edison still active?  I'm thinking of buying one.

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Lot's of projects with boards like these on Hackaday:

http://https://hackaday.com/?s=+Intel+Edison

 

I think this title says enough:

https://hackaday.com/2017/06/19/intel-discontinues-joule-galileo-and-edison-product-lines/

 

And if you read some of the comments below that article you will see a lot of complaints about lack of documentation.

Very few of the comments are surprised or sorry to see the board go.

That may be more telling than the discontinuation of the board itself.

 

Have you considered some small Linux board?

There are hundreds of them, they are very popular in the hobby world and have also been around in industrial applications for 20 year or more.

 

What kind of project do you want to do?

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 4, 2018 - 01:49 PM
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Boy you know how to pick em!

 

First you start with the barren wasteland that is AVR32-UC3

 

Now you look to using an embedded solution from Intel? Have you ever noticed how unthinkably hopeless Intel have been at trying to break into the embedded arena? There last success was probably the 4004!!

 

If you want a CPU  for IOT then isn't a Cortex (perhaps M7?) the more obvious choice?

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clawson wrote:
There last success was probably the 4004!!
smiley

but (unfortunately?) not true. MCS51 was pretty popular back in the '80s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_MCS-51

I don't know (nor do I care) if Intell still makes 8051 stuff.

It is however still being used today (for example Cypress CY7...).

 

For some "high power" specialty computing you may want to look into NVidia.

They make some strange stuff lately.

https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/data-center/dgx-1/

 

 

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 4, 2018 - 02:54 PM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 4, 2018 - 03:53 PM
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Yeah i know about 8051 but the point is it all went south for them from the 8088 onwards.

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Okay then lads, what would be the most powerful ARM development board support by Atmel Studio ASF.

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???

Edison is not on the list of asf devices ???

http://asf.atmel.com/docs/latest/

 

The hardkernel Odroid seem to be pretty nifty linux boxes, but Atmel software doesn't seem to run on Linux boxes...

Note: The swappable eMMC modules are a very nice touch to the Odroid boards. Performance & durability is also much better than the uSD cards lots of other Linux boards use.

 

Edit: Some of the Odroid boards have up to8 Processors on board and are upto 3 times faster than a Raspi. (Also because of the higher bandwidth of the eMMC.

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 4, 2018 - 08:47 PM
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If you want "powerful" isn't something like a wifi-rpi up there somewhere? Though obviously nothing to do with Atmel/Studio etc.

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You could google for "raspberry pi alternatives", or something similar, if you want to look at some possible choices.

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Paulvdh wrote:
MCS51 was pretty popular back in the '80s

But it only really took off when Intel dumped it - and every other chipmaker & his dog started making an 8051 "derivative".

 

The 8051 architecture was the Cortex of the 8-bit world - if Intel has actually supported &promoted it like ARM does Cortex, think where it could have got ... !

 

http://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

In Jube 2017, hardware.slashdot.org wrote:

Intel is discontinuing its Galileo, Joule, and Edison lineups of development boards. The chip-maker quietly made the announcement last week. From company's announcement:Intel Corporation will discontinue manufacturing and selling all skus of the Intel Galileo development board. Shipment of all Intel Galileo product skus ordered before the last order date will continue to be available from Intel until December 16, 2017. [...] Intel will discontinue manufacturing and selling all skus of the Intel Joule Compute Modules and Developer Kits (known as Intel 500 Series compute modules in People's Republic of China). Shipment of all Intel Joule products skus ordered before the last order date will continue to be available from Intel until December 16, 2017. Last time orders (LTO) for any Intel Joule products must be placed with Intel by September 16, 2017. [...] Intel will discontinue manufacturing and selling all skus of the Intel Edison compute modules and developer kits. Shipment of all Intel Edison product skus ordered before the last order date will continue to be available from Intel until December 16, 2017. Last time orders (LTO) for any Intel Edison products must be placed with Intel by September 16, 2017. All orders placed with Intel for Intel Edison products are non-cancelable and non-returnable after September 16, 2017.

 

https://hardware.slashdot.org/st...

 

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 5, 2018 - 12:08 PM
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An alternate to ASF for SAM arm Cortex-M7 is Microchip's SAM V software package (a bare board support package)

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/AppNotes/Atmel-44031-32-bit-Cortex-M7-Microcontroller-Getting-Started-SAM-V71-Microcontroller_ApplicationNote.pdf (p. 18 for GNU toolchain)

via http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/atsamv71q21

https://github.com/atmelcorp/atmel-software-package/tree/master/target/samv71/toolchain/gnu

 

 

An alternate to Atmel Studio is Microsoft Visual Studio Community with VisualGDB though that's not zero price :

https://github.com/sysprogs/BSPTools/blob/master/generators/Atmel/rules/McuAtmel.csv

https://visualgdb.com/?features=embedded

 

Edit: link target

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 5, 2018 - 03:58 PM
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right lads, going to go for a SAM board.  What was I thinking looking at Edison.

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do I need a new programmer for the SAM5, I currently use the JTAG ICE II

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Assumption is you meant SAMA5.

If that's true then will need a SAM-ICE or a SEGGER J-Link (or such from them)

If need trace then SEGGER J-Link Plus with select IDE.

An alternative to SAMA5 is PIC32MZ (MMU, trace via MPLAB REAL ICE)

 

http://www.microchip.com/DevelopmentTools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=AT91SAM-ICE

https://github.com/atmelcorp/atmel-software-package#run-and-debug-with-gdb

To run examples with gdb, JLinkGDBServer must be started. It can be downloaded for each platform at http://www.segger.com

...

https://wiki.segger.com/Tracing_on_Atmel_ATSAMA5D2

via https://www.segger.com/products/debug-probes/j-trace/technology/tested-devices/

http://www.microchip.com/design-centers/32-bit/architecture/pic32mz-family

http://www.microchip.com/developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DV244005 (MPLAB REAL ICE)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Does Microchips MPLAB ICD 4 In-Circuit Debugger/Programmer support SAM yet?

I assume SAM uses JTAG interface?...

​If so I'm holding out for that one, I'd say its just a matter of time.

I'm glad I didn't fork out for the Atmel-ICE when it came out.

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savman wrote:
Does Microchips MPLAB ICD 4 In-Circuit Debugger/Programmer support SAM yet?
No as of MPLAB X 4.10 Device Support (zero Atmel)

ICD 4 is currently beta for most PIC32.

savman wrote:
I assume SAM uses JTAG interface?...
Depends on the SAM (JTAG, SWD)

savman wrote:
​If so I'm holding out for that one, I'd say its just a matter of time.
fyi, there's an Atmel-ICE column in the MPLAB X 4.10 Device Support with one device in beta (CEC1702)

Atmel-ICE is in the Microchip Developer documentation.

savman wrote:
I'm glad I didn't fork out for the Atmel-ICE when it came out.
on sale this month

Atmel-ICE at 50% OFF!

http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/atmel-ice-50

 


http://www.microchip.com/developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DV164045 (MPLAB ICD 4)

http://www.microchip.com/mplab/mplab-x-ide

http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/cec1702

http://microchipdeveloper.com/atmelice:start

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote: 

fyi, there's an Atmel-ICE column in the MPLAB X 4.10 Device Support with one device in beta (CEC1702)
Atmel-ICE is in the Microchip Developer documentation.

Atmel-ICE at 50% OFF!

Hmm ok handy to know, thanks

 

I assume Atmel-ICE wont support PIC though?

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 6, 2018 - 05:39 AM
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The 8051 architecture was the Cortex of the 8-bit world - if Intel has actually supported &promoted it like ARM does Cortex, think where it could have got ... !

It did, didn't it?   Intel Licensed it widely, eventually (after patents expired?) spurring significant improvements and SoCs that are ubiquitous and really cheap.  Your phone may have an ARM chip, but the flash card you put in it probably has an 8051.  ARM probably wishes that their Cortex-M would do half as well, penetration-wise.   Preferably while they maintain control and collect royalties or license fees (which I don't think Intel managed to accomplish; much of the 8051 proliferation happened after they themselves got out of.)

 

The main problem is that the 8051 seems to be especially incompatible with most modern high-level languages. :-(

 

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savman wrote:
I assume Atmel-ICE wont support PIC though?
I assume that too.

MPLAB X 4.10 Device Support shows for MPLAB ICD 4 a lot of PIC (F, LF) (PIC18, PIC16, PIC12, PIC10) (beta)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
I assume Atmel-ICE wont support PIC though?

This month (Feb 2018) there is a sale for the "full package" of Atmel ICE with 50% off.

If you're optimistic it might be because Microchip has designed something new which supports both AVR's and PIC's and they want to get rid of the old ATAMEL-ICE before they put the new box on the market.

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

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http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/atmel-ice-50

Paulvdh wrote:
If you're optimistic ...
I am (relative to Atmel-ICE)

proposed :

  • UC3C instead of UC3A to get FlashVaultTM to secure it
  • SDRAM like Power Debugger (logic analyzer)
  • mux (instead of AVR or ARM it's debug and logic analyzer)
  • partial replacement for AVR ONE!  (very low impact data analysis capability for AVR 0-series, 1-series, and XMEGA)

pragmatic - bean counters said SALE! wink

Maybe realists will come fore (economics)

 


AVR - Calibration & Daq toolchain?
http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/avr-calibration-daq-toolchain

 

Edits: link target, last URL

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 6, 2018 - 03:38 PM
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Fianawarrior wrote:

do I need a new programmer for the SAM5, I currently use the JTAG ICE II

If you go for one of the Xplained boards, then you won't need an external debugger/programmer. Many of them have one built in already.

 

My suggestions, based on what I've used and in order of increasing performance/features: SAM4S Xplained Pro, SAME54 Xplained Pro, and SAME70 Xplained.

 

Steve

 

Maverick Embedded Technologies Ltd. Home of the wAVR: WiFi AVR ISP/PDI/uPDI Programmer. http://www.maverick-embedded.co.uk/

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Guys, I like the SAMA5D4 Xplained Ultra.  Cn I ask a few questions.  I'm downloading MPLABX at the moment.  Does it support the the SAM5 MPU and does it have a Software Frame work to get you started.

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Fianawarrior wrote:
I'm downloading MPLABX at the moment.  Does it support the the SAM5 MPU ...
No for SAMA5

Fianawarrior wrote:
... and does it have a Software Frame work to get you started.
Yes for PIC32

Microchip Technology Inc

Microchip

MPLAB® Harmony Integrated Software Framework
http://www.microchip.com/mplab/mplab-harmony

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Fianawarrior wrote:
Guys, I like the SAMA5D4 Xplained Ultra.
I'm confused then - the Intel Edison was an "IOT" solution but a Cortex A5 isn't really. It's an "application processor". As I said the other day Atmel (now Microchips) flag waver for IOT would like be the Cortex M7 and if you look at:

 

http://start.atmel.com/#examples...

 

you will find it littered with example projects and module support. Nothing there (AFAICS) for Cortex A5.

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8-bit, 16-bit & 32-bit

Exploring and Overcoming the Challenges of 32-bit Embedded Software Development

February 6th, 2017

by Anand Rangarajan, Microchip Technology, Inc.

http://eecatalog.com/8bit/2017/02/06/exploring-and-overcoming-the-challenges-of-32-bit-embedded-software-development/

...

The [MPLAB Harmony] framework integrates both internal and third party middleware, drivers, peripheral libraries and real-time operating systems, to simplify and accelerate the 32-bit code development process.

... 

via https://plus.google.com/+MicrochipTech/posts/5UDh6PUfths

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller