Has ARM destroyed market for 8 bit micros?

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Seems every job around now use ARM for everything. Are 8 bit micros becoming extinct?

:cry:

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HELL NO!!! :(

The 8051 is a great example. The bugger is still used in new designs and there are so many variants with added features.

Plus look at some of the designs out there. Do you really need an ARM when a simple 8bit avr can run a programmable thermostat?

If 8bit micros are becomming extinct, the Mfr.s would be dropping some warnings like EOL, oe Not recommended for new designs....

I personally hope the 8bit micro never dies because I cannot count past ten ;)

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than to attempt nothing and succeed. - Fortune cookie

 

Don't hang your hat on expectations because this often leads to disappointment.

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CC58 wrote:
Seems every job around now use ARM for everything. Are 8 bit micros becoming extinct?

:cry:


May be... in a couple of tens years... Not yet. I believe so.

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And some 8 bit MCU cores are part of bigger ICs, like USB memory card readers, USB flash drives etc.

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jgmdesign wrote:

I personally hope the 8bit micro never dies because I cannot count past ten ;)

Jim


I also think so. I prefer using 8-bit uC where they perform their work completely well and theirs features are enough.
Of course I've been learning ARM (LPC2468) to know much more. But I don't want to use TQFP (more than 100 pins) or BGA package for a simple device like a climate control or something else.

But for main processing unit ARM is vacant. Why? Because of its ability to work with SD-cards (not only in SPI-mode), because ARMs have a lot of interfaces (Ethernet, CAN, USB and so on), because they can run desktop OS (Windows, Linux and so on...) I know much of them we can make using AVR. But I say about full-function ones...

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Not this same old thread for the five billionth time. Did you even bother to search to see if this had been asked before?

I'm tempted to lock this as yet another cross-post, but I suppose the situation varies every few months as more and more cheap Coretex M0 and M3 become available.

BTW I don't know why Leon saw the need to try and advertise MCHP devices for the bazillionth time either. If the argument is that 8bit manufacturers continue to make new 8bit devices that's as true for AVR as anything else. There's just been a whole raft of new USB enabled Xmegas released for example.

Moderator.

 

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jayjay1974 wrote:
And some 8 bit MCU cores are part of bigger ICs, like USB memory card readers, USB flash drives etc.

Yeah. Let's remember old RS-232 (USART). It is still used. Where? In USB CDMA modems, for example. Connect such modem to Windows or Linux-based PC and you'll see at least one or even two serial ports. One port can take AT-commands, another one can take binary data.
Let's look at Bluetooth dongles. The contains Bluetooth module inside equipped with serial port that exchanges with PC through USB/Serial bridge...
As far as I know serial port lives since 1960s...

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Quote:

Connect such modem to Windows or Linux-based PC and you'll see at least one or even two serial ports.

You do know they are not real don't you? The whole reason they are called V-COMs is because V=Virtual - they don't physically exists - only logically. The hardware is USB and it's all but taken over from RS232.

 

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Yes, most beginners want using the ARM.
Because they are thinking, that bad program flow and bad programming style can
be compensated by bigger data width, faster clock and bigger memory.
But this was a mistake. :!:

Peter

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CC58 wrote:
Seems every job around now use ARM for everything.
The key word here is "seems".

They simply scream louder, sorry, have better publicity.

JW

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You are wise Peter, some people will wrote a bad application on a 700MHz 32bits ARM with Embedded Linux that drive an LCD display, and some others will write the same application on a 16MHz 8bits CPU...

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