Converting 110Vac to 220Vac

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1. I have made a circuit operating from 220Vac/50Hz. It had capacitive supply to power up the microcontroller, which inturn controls the triac to switch 220Vac/50Hz to heating wire which is resistive in nature. 
heating wire is resistive, which consumes 70W on 220Vac/50Hz.

 

2. Now I am checing some possibility if same circuit can work on 110Vac/60Hz. I think same capacitive supply can work(that I will check), but heating wire will not get heat up from 110Vac/60Hz, as it gets heat up at 220Vac/50Hz.

 

3. I am searching for some very light weight circuit which can do this. As this needs to be fit inside a handheld remote.
First thought was to use a transformer, but it will be bulky.

 

4. I think frequency does not affect much, as capacitive ckt will work fine & load is also resistive

 

5. Any ckt suggestion on this, On google I mainly found transformer based ckt or i am searching with wrong keywords

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Does wire need to get AC? (if not two diodes and 2 caps can do the job) 

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220Vac in a small handheld remote control?

 

I would not try to conver 110Vac to 220Vac and ten try to run a uC of of that.

I would change the capacitive power supply to run on the new voltage.

If you have a capacitive power supply then you basically need to halve the capacitance if you double the input voltage.

 

And 50Hz <=> 60Hz is a 20 percent difference and this is "not insignificant".

So if the frequency goes up by 20% make your capacitor 20% smaller.

 

Or is are you trying to get more power out of your wire at lower input voltage?

Is it for an electric blanket?

 

As sparrow suggested. Using a bridge rectifier and some 400V caps (from an old PC power supply for example) can upp the power through your wire.

But a triac can not switch DC, so you will have to switch AC before the bridge rectifier.

 

Duh,

I think sparrow means a "voltage doubler" with 2 diodes +2 caps.

https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=vo...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vo...

https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=vo...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vo...

 

But if you just rectify and flatten (capacitor) the voltage you already have increased the effective resulting voltage, so don't go too far.

Twice the voltage is 4 times the power (in the same resistive load).

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

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3. I am searching for some very light weight circuit which can do this. As this needs to be fit inside a handheld remote.
First thought was to use a transformer, but it will be bulky.
.
What on earth handheld remote with 70W-220VAC heater for?
.
Do I misunderstand this?
.
Heater can be powered from DC if it don't include any other AC part.
You can just doubler the 110VAC with diodes and elco but that not small either.
.
MG

I don't know why I'm still doing this hobby

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Does wire need to get AC? (if not two diodes and 2 caps can do the job)

    That would be bulky.

 

    I would select a wire for 110V and work out with the triac to reduce power when powered at 220V, maybe just turn it on every other half AC cycle. Some heat guns work like this.

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Another solution can be: using two-phases of 110 volts instead of single-phase, if available

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 4, 2017 - 08:21 PM
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I am betting that there is a whole lot of confusion, here.

 

My odds are on the idea that this hand-held remote controls some device that runs on 110V AC and that the OP wants said device to run on 240V AC. 

 

So far, Vindhyachal Takniki  has not provided much clarification. Until the OP fills in some details, its all a big guess. Any chance that this individual is "related" in some way to SICILY?

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Actually Jim, the OP states he has 240v heater that works, but would like to run it on 110V.....  

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Another solution can be: using two-phases of 110 volts instead of single-phase, if available

    While possible, only few outlets in your house / office have both phases available, especially for hungry power appliances like electric stove, water heater etc.

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Sounds like an electric blanket or similar.  The easiest solution would be to cut the heating wire in half.  Run the heating elements in series on 220 and in parallel on 110.  Whatever is switching the current will have to be resized to handle twice the current it does now operating on 220 to be able to get the same power output on 110.

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

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Vindhyachal Takniki wrote:
1. I have made a circuit

So show your schematic!

 

As the others have said, your description sounds very strange - a better description would help to understand and, thus, to be able to offer appropriate suggestions.

 

Photographs could help.

 

How to post images: http://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...