video streaming

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#1
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hi every one,
my graduation project is Car Kit (car security)
>> sending notifications about car to mobile app.
>> sending coordinates of car location and speed using GPS module
>> send image , video stream from car over 3G module to mobile ( over internet)
i interfaced RFID and GPS to Atmega32.
Now : i want to send notification over internet HOW??
especially VIDEO streaming

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Use of Google protobuf has been mentioned for 3G modules.
Video - may be easier to store it local then upload when the car is recovered.
That may be how automobile dash cams use it.

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Here's a suggestion: get a wifi/3g gateway (tplink wr3040), load openwrt firmware. Plug in usb camera and load camera app. Job done.

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gchapman wrote:
Use of Google protobuf has been mentioned for 3G modules.
Video - may be easier to store it local then upload when the car is recovered.
That may be how automobile dash cams use it.

i need video to be 'RUN TIME'

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Kartman wrote:
Here's a suggestion: get a wifi/3g gateway (tplink wr3040), load openwrt firmware. Plug in usb camera and load camera app. Job done.

i need to control camera with controller not streaming alltime

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Quote:
Here's a suggestion: get a wifi/3g gateway (tplink wr3040), load openwrt firmware. Plug in usb camera and load camera app. Job done.

Nice, I didn't konw about this 3G routers.
Quote:
i need to control camera with controller not streaming alltime

Video isn't a easy stuff to generate and transmit. So me advice is go for a ready solution like the others freaks said.
There is wireless analog video transition too.
To control the camera you should do with different hardware, like another RF module and a circuit to perform your controls tasks.

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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brunomusw wrote:

There is wireless analog video transition too.
To control the camera you should do with different hardware, like another RF module and a circuit to perform your controls tasks.

RF?? i need to monitor car where ever I am

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With the 3g router, add a USB memory stick and record the video. You can operate it as a DVR.

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Kartman wrote:
With the 3g router, add a USB memory stick and record the video. You can operate it as a DVR.

store video is an option ... is that possible to stream it?

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Can you stream it? Wasnt that in my first suggestion?

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Netduino or Raspberry pi ??

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Raspberry Pi with a usb hub and 3G dongle -it's all Linux. I suggested a wifi router as it's cheaper, smaller and packaged. Also, with Openwrt, the support and packages for 3G support are precompiled.

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Kartman, what he will get with the tplink wr3040 or tplink wr3040 + Openwrt?

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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What will he get with a wr3040? It's a battery operated 3g/Wifi gateway. When you load openwrt which is an open linux build, you have the choice of customising the unit many different ways. For a web cam, you need to load usb drivers for your usb camera then load an application like motion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(surveillance_software)
that grabs the vision from the camera and streams it via the web.

You'll also need to load drivers for the 3G dongle used ( only some are supported) and configure this for your network.
http://wiki.openwrt.org/doc/recipes/3gdongle

the wr3040 only has one usb port, so you need a hub. If you run out of flash space, you can add a memory stick so that you can record video to it. It's a bit like a raspberry pi that runs off a battery, has no video and with less ram (32mb) and only 4mb flash. The cpu is only a lowly 400MHz.
http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/tl-mr3040

These devices are also handy for adding wifi to your Arduino. The Arduino gets powered by the unit as well.

there's a family of similar devices:
wr703 no battery and chinese firmware (I paid $17 usd ea for these)
mr 3020 international version of the 703 (going price around $30 usd)

mr 3040 adds battery ( around $50 usd)

OpenWRT has a swag of precompiled drivers and applications ready for download. Remember it's just Linux - just don't expect to run Joomla! The small ram is a bit of a limitation.
You can do many things with these little babies!

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Kartman the wr703 or WR3040 has PCB antennas for the 3G link, right?
Does other 3G router came with SMA connectors or other to connect it to an external antenna?

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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These routers do not have 3G built in - you plug in a usb 3G dongle.

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Brunomusw, if you want to get you feet wet with Linux, I'd suggest starting with Ubuntu on your PC. You can run this under Windows by using Virtualbox or VMWare. I've had better success with VMWare. You can then download the various packages and try them out. If you want to go down the path of embedded Linux, then look at devices like the raspberry pi, beagleboard/bone or a supported wireless router.

http://wiki.openwrt.org/

look at the list of supported devices. You want one with as much flash,ram and usb as possible. The minimum is 4MB flash, 32M ram. The tplink units seem to have good support since they use the Atheros chipset. If you choose a model that has precompiled binaries, that makes things easier to begin with. You can download the Openwrt environment to your Ubuntu linux on the pc. This will download whatever is required and will build your selected binary ready for loading into the router. You can select what packages and drivers you require. Note that it can take many hours to do the first build as a lot of files are downloaded and the compiler tools are built. You can also write your own code and cross compile. For a number of routers, Openwrt has a significant number of apps and drivers precompiled ready for download. There is soooo much stuff for Linux it does my head in. One has to do much Googling.

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Quote:

I've had better success with VMWare.

Complete opposite of my experience so you can probably call that one a draw ;-)

The fact is that even if you develop for embedded Linux it's much easier to cross-compile on a PC based Linux anyway (and debug from it). So you'll want a way to run Linux on your development PC anyway. If you use a network mount you can have the embedded target share directories on the Linux host so as soon as the compilation is finished the embedded target can see the executable. Run gdb-server on the embedded target and gdbb+favourite IDE in the Linux host to remotely debug it across the TCP/IP connection.

 

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Cliff, i gave virtualbox a go since you had made positive comments about it. I had no end of problems when connecting usb sticks and serial adapters. No issues on an old vmware player. This was the latest version of vb as of over a month ago.

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How very odd. The very reason I gave up on VMWare and switched to Virtualbox was for the exact same reason. I had no end of problems with getting USB devices mapped in to the virtual machines. I switched to VirtualBox and all the problems went away.

I imagine it will probably be pretty dependent on host operating system and version and possibly even the USB hardware in use (both devices and host side).

When I first switched from VMWare to VB it was running Linux guests inside a Vista host. These days I have a Linux host and guest Windows (XP) machines.