gg toolgain for --- ubantu linux & AVR

Last post
15 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi,

Initially i was programming AVR on windows for last 2 years, with WINAVR everything comes ready to use.

Now I have started using UBANTU linux. What is the right toolchain for LINUX. How can make everything working :?:

Please help me in this starting stage :?:

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

OR build it yourself.
http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=download&id=17480
unzip and follow the directions in the readme file.

BTW you do mean Ubuntu don't you?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:
BTW you do mean Ubuntu don't you
Sorry mistake. Its Ubuntu only.

What is the diffrence between two packages. Both we have to run some scripts :?:

Quote:
OR build it yourself.
Even the one which cliff sugested we also have to be build :?: Also there is no concept of .EXE files in linux to have one click instalation.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:

Even the one which cliff sugested we also have to be build

No you don't. It's a deb. You just "dpkg -i" to install the prebuilt binaries. I see no point in attempting to build a GCC toolchain for Ubuntu (or any Debian distro) when Bing600 is good enough to build it for you.

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:
Quote:

Even the one which cliff sugested we also have to be build

No you don't. It's a deb. You just "dpkg -i" to install the prebuilt binaries. I see no point in attempting to build a GCC toolchain for Ubuntu (or any Debian distro) when Bing600 is good enough to build it for you.

Linux doesn't have a self extracting package format like Windows does, it uses a distro dependent installer (Yum for Suse, dpkg for debian/ubuntu, etc). In Ubuntu if you double click on the .deb file in the file manager it will probably just install it or offer to do so.

I only built mine since I wanted a native 64 bit image as I'm running the 64 bit kernel on my computer. You might also want to build it yourself if you want to build a version optimized for the processor you are running (but I doubt you would notice the difference in performance).

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:

Linux doesn't have a self extracting package format like Windows does, it uses a distro dependent installer (Yum for Suse, dpkg for debian/ubuntu, etc). In Ubuntu if you double click on the .deb file in the file manager it will probably just install it or offer to do so.

But ultimately, as far as the end user is concerned, what's the difference between a .msi on Windows or a .deb on Debian (inc Ubuntu) then?

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:
Quote:

Linux doesn't have a self extracting package format like Windows does, it uses a distro dependent installer (Yum for Suse, dpkg for debian/ubuntu, etc). In Ubuntu if you double click on the .deb file in the file manager it will probably just install it or offer to do so.

But ultimately, as far as the end user is concerned, what's the difference between a .msi on Windows or a .deb on Debian (inc Ubuntu) then?

On a distro like Ubuntu nothing since Canonical has dumbed down the installer for the user to a point and click interface (just like Windows). On a distro like Debian the user must know how to run dpkg in order to install the application. (Which means knowing how to get to the command line!)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:

On a distro like Debian the user must know how to run dpkg in order to install the application. (Which means knowing how to get to the command line!)

I've never run dpkg by any other means but the command line ;-)

Cliff ("luddite")

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:
Quote:

On a distro like Debian the user must know how to run dpkg in order to install the application. (Which means knowing how to get to the command line!)

I've never run dpkg by any other means but the command line ;-)

Cliff ("luddite")


The two of us are old hands at Linux. New Linux users starting via Ubuntu with NO knowledge of command line unix wouldn't 'get it'.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks for support.

also i have brought Intel Atom Motherboard,(cheapest available in market) i want to practice linux kernel & application programming.

Please suggest some good tutorial --- or how to start building tool chain or rootfile system & Zimage to see my first program running of ATOM processor .

Please suggest, something on it :?:

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Isn't the Atom x86 code compatible? If this is a standard PC motherboard just start by attaching a HD, DVDrom drive, memory, kb, network, mouse, memory, and power supply and just boot a Linux CD. OR boot using an image on a USB flash stick. If the motherboard supports booting via TFTP off of a network you can set up a TFTP server on another computer (probably not worth the effort at this point).

ANY Linux distro will work, but to start off small Slackware is a good choice. If you don't mind reading the manuals Arch Linux is also a good choice, but it isn't as easy to install. Debian is also good, use the non-graphical install and do NOT select any packages in the final step (command line only none graphical desktop) ... unless you WANT to run a GUI desktop, then pick LXDE or XFC at the start from the 'alternate desktop' menu at boot time.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:

Please suggest some good tutorial

Google "roll your own kernel"

EDIT: should get you here http://www.howtoforge.com/roll_a_kernel_debian_ubuntu_way

Personally I'd implement a command line Ubuntu (get the "alternative" CD)

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

There's also 'Linux from scratch'

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0