Has ARM destroyed market for 8 bit micros?

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clawson wrote:
only logically. The hardware is USB and it's all but taken over from RS232.

Of course I know :-) But RS232 logic is still inside. Why? Isn't there any progressive protocol? I thing it's been done for compatibility with old software, for example.

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Magister wrote:
You are wise Peter, some people will wrote a bad application on a 700MHz 32bits ARM with Embedded Linux that drive an LCD display, and some others will write the same application on a 16MHz 8bits CPU...

Yes, it's right! But there are a lot of task where ARM is really needed. Everyone choose his way to build a system. He can take ARM, he can take AVR, PIC, STM8 and so on...
But it should be wise choice.
I saw some tries to implement video processing on AVR(8), PIC(8). I think it must be study task not real product...
It should be taken into account that people use familiar instruments. And it is sometimes obvious if someone (who knows AVR very well) tries to make video compressing on AVR :-)

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Let's just say it's amazing that for less than the price of a mega48 one can get an ARM with 2x the flash, 4x the RAM, more than double the raw speed, better timer capabilites, more IO, 1% internal clock, etc.

But mega48 has 5V operation, much better output drive, EEPROM, among other advantages. Since I need some of those in my latest project, I'm using the AVR part. But now for every design I look first at ARM, and only if it doesn't cut the mustard do I look at 8 bit.

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And you can have this for $25...
http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/106

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Quote:

And you can have this for $25...

No you can't. See:

http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=115370&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=

Then:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Raspberry-Pi-Model-B-beta-board-10-limited-series-10-/180786734741?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item2a17baa695#ht_500wt_1334

So the current price for that board (of which there only actually appears to be one so far) is £1,900 !

(you will see my cynical suggestion that this may be deliberate to sell a handful of boards at a stupidly high price to the first idiots that turn up - I still believe that - see also my comment about €35 buying this: http://www.watterott.com/de/FriendlyARM-Micro2440-64MB - I confirm that really exists as I've used one and it is phenomenal value for money)

 

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Cliff, the beta board was bought and gave to a museum (and they sold 10 beta boards, not one).
Also they started manufacturing the Pi in China, so wait a couple of days/weeks before seeing it.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/

If it's really $25, even $35, I will test it for sure :)

A quick google search gave me a couple of link that should be trusted, I still highly doubt it's vaporware.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2012/01/raspberry-pis-35-700mhz-linux-computer-enters-manufacturing.ars
http://www.reghardware.com/2012/01/13/raspberry_pi_foundation_rolls_out_linux_based_pcs/
http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/11/raspberry-pi-begins-production/

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Oh I'll grant you they have a great marketing department. Either T3 or Stuff even mentioned the thing. But having worked for a company that used to have one of the most aggressive marketing departments you've ever met I know it doesn't actually take much to circulate a sexy looking press release and get it listed as news in various magazines, websites and so on. The proof of the pi will be in the eating I guess!

 

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leon_heller wrote:
Microchip is the market leader in 8-bit devices. They recently announced several new 8-bit chips with some interesting new features, as well as 16-bit and 32-bit devices, so they must believe that there is a market for them.

I don't like Microchip's spaghetti approach: build it, throw it at the wall and hope for something to stick.

Instead of reducing the errata on their dspic stuff they're releasing more and more designs.

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There are far more, and much more serious, errata for the Xmega devices.

Leon Heller
G1HSM

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Hey Leon,
I was wondering, have you ever done a design using an avr and not going near your beloved Mchp? Where you used the avr because it was the best chip for the job?

I have yet to see you support Atmel without bringing up the "M" word in some fashion.

Just for the record so I don't sound hypocritical, I am using a Mchip eeprom in something I am working on because it was the best chip at the moment. It came in DIP packaging so it fit in my breadboard.

.....The final product though will have an smd part TBD

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than to attempt nothing and succeed. - Fortune cookie

 

Don't hang your hat on expectations because this often leads to disappointment.

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