Proteus anyone/everyone?

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I keep seeing various posts mentioning Proteus; not really familiar with it.  Is this something that has become defacto popular the last year with the freaks?  Is it a good deal (ie: freeware, or limited freeware).  Maybe I'm missing out on the fun.  It seems like simulating might be useful at times, but I've seen a lot of poor processor simulations in the past, where critical peripheral parameters were not 100% modeled correctly.  I've been more on the LTspice train, riding it for circuit simulation & watching the scope traces roll by.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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Buy some XPLAIN boards and an Atmel ICE....Far cheaper, far more accurate.

 

And they work with REAL hardware.  Proteus is notorious for not identifying short circuits for example.

 

Jim

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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No, it's not freeware at all. Pretty expensive, actually, but pirated versions are easily available from the usual sources, therefore you see a lot of people using it.

As you know, software piracy is rampant in some countries, I guess it's a cultural thing. I never endorse it, but never criticize it either. I'm no judge.

 

Anyway, another software with similar capabilities (i.e. mixed analog/digital simulation) is DesignSoft TINA, but this one is less popular. It's also quite expensive.

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Proteus is notorious for not identifying short circuits for example.

My 100 amp supply highlights any short circuits quick! No lengthy all-day probing needed.  angel

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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My impression was that some educational classes are using Proteus instead of real hardware.

Education is a tricky business, and there are all sorts of reasons why a teacher or school might prefer a "non-industry-standard" set of software.  (Educational license.  Easy deployment.  Grading tools.  Security issues.  "Courseware."

 

(My college "assembly language" class, back in about 1979, did a section for PDP/11 on a simulator.  "Put your initial values in memory using the tool, run your code, and see if the correct results are in the proper memory location."  (Because, after all, doing actual IO is not actually part of the assembly language, I guess.  I was not impressed.))

 

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The impression I get of Proteus is that it looks quite excellent and on the whole it does a great job of not only simulating AVRs (and their internal peripherals) like the simulator in AS7 does but it also "knows" how to simulate pretty much all common external peripherals too. So unlike AS7 you really can design a complete "system" and then see if it will work before you commit to copper. Sure we see the odd report where it appears to have made a simulation error but sometimes I wonder if that is simply a result of wrong usage or, I suppose, that in software this complex it's almost inevitable there will be some bugs (just as there are buried deep in C compilers and so on!)

 

I notice from:

 

https://www.labcenter.com/buy-vs...

 

that as well as the "full price" €393 version they now have "feature restricted" bundles for a more reasonable €200.

 

I think there may be a "free" trial version that can do most things except save.

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jgmdesign wrote:

Proteus is notorious for not identifying short circuits for example.

 

And in fairness to it, nor should it. It is after all a mixed-mode simulator. Connect something to ground and create a short circuit, which in the real world would kill your device, and it won't tell you but it will allow you to measure the magnitude of the short-circuit current.

 

Maybe you could argue that if your design would burn out a chip in real life then a simulator ought to do the same. Or maybe it ought to randomly burn out a few kB of memory of your PC just to release some magic smoke for that authentic look-and-feel wink

"This forum helps those that help themselves."

"If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

 

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Personally I think it's actually pretty clever in some areas. Like in the area of HD44780 simulation for example, it'll say things like "you are only waiting 22ms after reset, it should be 30ms" or whatever the real numbers are.

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"I think there may be a "free" trial version that can do most things except save."

 

There is (was puzzled by proteus and asked its/his/her site)  ; and it is a cruel blunder to ask someone using the free version for a schematic (cannot be saved nor printed)....

Last Edited: Wed. Feb 14, 2018 - 01:36 PM
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dbrion0606 wrote:
schematic (cannot be saved nor printed)....

I guess that's why we see so many screenshots ... ?

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The demo says you can't simulate your own MCU designs? But that's the whole point of Proteus!

If you just wanted a pure analog simulator, there are plenty of free options.

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I was less puzzled when having a look at their site (but making a commercial software free modalities can vary with time: some student editions of matlab could last almost another year -though there were free clones, : octave and scilab-)....

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Proteus had important role in my progress in MCU and digital design
I was impressed by COMPIM : connecting real hardware to PC com port and communicate with virtual MCU model
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Like every other software it may have bug / issue, reported bugs are fixed and updated latest version must be used
.
I think price is reasonable if you earn money from your project,
if not earn money, evaluation version available
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Surely not proteus nor every other sim program never can take real hardware place,
İts an aid tool, very useful for students

Majid

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 15, 2018 - 02:07 AM
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Proteus is  a Great Software!

No one do what it do

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Main issue with proteus in these fora :

few people use it (hobbyists cannot afford)

very often (I know that I am biased) people who come for help do not need proteus - specific help, but AVR-specific help (or they forget bypass condenstaors; proteus does not simulate consequences) 

As there is a bias against it (people coming with very basic issues cannot be professional -> their proteus is seen as a pirate one; their question is seen as a pirate question), hinting of proteus  hides their question.