worth while IPv6

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Is it worth while writing creating a IPv6 stack for embedded systems?

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Most people would tell you it's not worth while writing or creating your own IPv4 stack ...

 

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I'm talking about an IPv6 not IPv4

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I think you missed the sarcasm!

 

 

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How in the hell did I, I'm Irish

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Any input would be appreciated guys...

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Any relevant input?

I'll attempt wink

IPv6 is already in some frameworks and RTOS.

8b and 16b MCU in deeply embedded systems can implement standard I/O to a 32b MCU or MPU that has IPv6.

 

Microchip Technology Inc

Microchip

MPLAB Harmony

http://www.microchip.com/mplab/mplab-harmony

...

 

TCP/IP Network Stack and WiFi support

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The BSD layer compatibility has been greatly improved, new dynamic socket options have been added as well as IPv6 support.

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The Contiki OS

Contiki: The Open Source OS for the Internet of Things

http://www.contiki-os.org/

...

 

Full IP Networking

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The Contiki IPv6 stack, developed by and contributed to Contiki by Cisco, is fully certified under the IPv6 Ready Logo program.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I have friends in the internet business who claim that ipv6 is important and necessary, especially for things like IoT where there are potentially a trillion devices.

Personally, I'm not convinced - the workarounds (NAT, etc) in IPv4 seem to work really well.

 

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Fianawarrior wrote:

How in the hell did I, I'm Irish

 

well that makes it official then... even Irish have off days

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Because of NAT I too doubt the need for IPv6.

 

Think about all your own uses of IP in your house or office? Are you really messing with anything but four part IPV4 addressing? In fact I'd go as far as to say that almost everything you do/configure is probably somewhere under 192.168.x.x

 

Sure you may set up some DNS servers (probably 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 in fact!) with a more global IP range but even then it's still IPv4 not v6.

 

Maybe the Cisco's of this world and the others that provide the "backbone" of the internet concern themselves with IPv6 - but domestic use? Even more so, "embedded micro" domestic use ? I don't think so.

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westfw wrote:
I have friends in the internet business who claim that ipv6 is important and necessary, especially for things like IoT where there are potentially a trillion devices.

The premise for this argument is that every single "Thing" in the Internet of "Things" needs to have its own, globally-unique, globally-addressable IP address.

 

Personally, I'm not convinced 

Neither am I.

 

I think the basic premise is flawed.

 

I don't see the point in being able to directly address every single lightbulb in my from anywhere in the world.

 

It seems far more sensible that I address my house, and then the things within it are just "sub addresses" of my house - which is what NAT effectively gives us.

 

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I don't see the point in being able to directly address every single lightbulb in my from anywhere in the world.

More to the point, I see a need to >>prevent<< direct access to every single light bulb from anywhere in the world.  Do you trust the light bulb manufacturer to get security right?  Or do you do the sensible thing and put it behind a routing/NATting firewall?  Will you have a trillion light bulbs behind that firewall? 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"Read a lot.  Write a lot."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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joeymorin wrote:
Or do you do the sensible thing and put it behind a routing/NATting firewall?
... or more than that as an IoT edge device.

embedded.com

IoT security: Putting trust in the edge

October 30, 2017

https://www.embedded.com/electronics-blogs/embedded-view/4459023/IoT-security--Putting-trust-in-the-edge

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... ARM has drawn a line in the sand for IoT security – a line that passes straight through the edge that separates IoT terminal nodes from the cloud.

 

IoT edge devices are emerging as a kind of catch-all device, defined variously as local data aggregators, device controllers, data/state buffers, fog computing appliances, cloud gateways, and more.

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Designed to provide developers with a concrete roadmap to IoT security, the ARM PSA [Platform Security Architecture] combines a security use-case analysis with hardware/firmware specifications and an open-source reference implementation ...

...

 

FreedomBox combines firewall and some local device access with (planned) mesh networking :

Debian

Debian

FreedomBox

Introduction

https://wiki.debian.org/FreedomBox/Introduction

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Advanced usage: Smart Home Router

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FreedomBox provides a VPN server ... to securely access various devices at home.

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In the future, FreedomBox intends to deliver support for alternative ways of connecting to the Internet such as Mesh networking.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Feck it!  I think I will implement IPv6.  Only problem is finding tools to test and debug development.

 

Thanks for the input lads.

 

Wm.

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Is it worth while to replace the Internet?

Yes

 

RT

‘By the people, for the people’: Kim Dotcom to launch alternative internet

Published time: 22 Nov, 2017 10:56 Edited time: 23 Nov, 2017

https://www.rt.com/news/410606-kim-dotcom-meganet-internet/

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Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom says he will help facilitate an unobstructed internet, free from prying eyes, through MegaNet, which will operate without IP addresses.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Just wondering:

What is your reason for wanting IPV6 for your project?

Not for domestic use probably (See all above).

Is it for some remote node directly connected to Internet?

 

If power consumption (battery) is not a too great concern I'd probably use some Linux capable hardware. That stuf starts at USD 5 nowaday's.

 

Wireshark is great for debugging.

On linux there are also command line ethernet capture tools.

 

ESP8266 is about the cheapest hardware (USD2)  you can find with TCP/IP (Built in WiFi) and therefore it's popular with hachers / hobbyists.

A quick search showed some availabilty of IPv6 for that hardware.

https://github.com/esp8266/Ardui...

 

What kind of hardware do you have in mind?

Paul van der Hoeven.
Bunch of old projects with AVR's:
http://www.hoevendesign.com

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Zephyr Project

Zephyr Project

What is the Zephyr Project?

https://www.zephyrproject.org/what-is-zephyr/

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Connected

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Supports standards like 6Lowpan, CoAP, IPv4, IPv6, and NFC

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Zephyr's Microchip and related boards are Arduino Due, SAM4S Xplained, and SAM E70 Xplained :

http://docs.zephyrproject.org/boards/boards.html

 


Mouser Electronics Česká republika - Elektronické soucástky Distributor

Mouser Electronics

Open Source RTOS Comes to IoT

On September 6, 2016 in Dev Tools, IoT by Lynnette Reese

https://www.mouser.com/blog/open-source-rtos-comes-to-iot

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Recently, Intel released WindRiver’s “nano-kernel” RTOS, formerly called “Rocket,” to The Linux Foundation (LF) and was renamed “Zephyr.”

...

 

Edit: typo

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Nov 30, 2017 - 05:38 AM