NXP bought Freescale

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bobgardner wrote:

I remember this argument from the 70s.... was a 68008 8 bit or 32 bit? How bout the xt 8088?  Is the number of bits the width of the internal data path, the number of external data lines, or the width of the accumulator? I guess a microcontroller doesnt have an external data bus, so that criterion is out. You could put a fast arm in a 16 pin pack with a couple spis and it could get a lot done.

 

 

Nothing has been clarified since the 70s!  People go about saying cortex is 32bits even though it uses the 16bit instruction set.  Its probably because the arm7tdmi was 32bits and the cortex is better so it must be 32bits?  What about avr, is that really 8 bits?  because it also uses 16bit instructions.

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The 'bitness' is determined by the width of the data path not the width of the instructions. You can generally tell by the number of clocks it takes to do a 8 vs 16 vs 32 add. For an 8 bit data path, we could assume an 8 bit data path would take over 4 times the clocks to add a 32 bit number.
An 8088 was a 16 bit cpu
As was a 68000
A cortex m3 is a 32 bit cpu
An AVR is an 8 bit cpu

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 6, 2015 - 09:09 PM
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So the width of the accumulators doesnt have any bitness to it? Seems like it should.

Imagecraft compiler user

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whats a word length?

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Looks like 6 characters

Imagecraft compiler user

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8 bit ARM eh? An ARM processor is one whose core is licensed from ARM, LLC. Trademark, copyright, etc.

 

I've seen only 32 bit MCUs from ARM (considering too the 16 bit thumb mode, changeable on the fly)

 

 

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Kartman wrote:

An 8088 was a 16 bit cpu

I recall it being an 8 bit processor with some 16 bit instructions.

As was the 6809.

 

The ARM7 has thumb mode which is 16 bit. Some called it a 16/32 bit processor. You can elect to run in either mode. Compilers/run-times had to generate inter-working code.

 

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 7, 2015 - 04:32 AM
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Bob, in a processor you have two main paths, the data path that consists of the registers, alu etc and the control path which pulls the various levers like select the alu op, register src and dest etc.

Stevech - the 8088 was a 8086 with a 8 bit bus interface. I think you'll find it was 16bit. The 6809 was 8 bit with instructions to do 16 bit ops. Similarly, the 68000 was 16 bit with some 32bit ops.
Thumb mode is 16 bit instruction width - the ARM conditional execution bits were chopped off and the opcodes squeezed down to get better code efficiency (that word again...). If we were to relate 'bitness' to the instruction length that would be mighty confusing with CISC cpus - the instruction length varied significantly.
In the olden days there were some bit serial processors (1 bit) drum computers?

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 7, 2015 - 06:44 AM
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I recall it being an 8 bit processor with some 16 bit instructions.

Like Kartman says, I have a tube of them  around, maybe 10 or 20 never used fro the past 25 years....how time flies!!

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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They're probably worth money! If you're short of hc11a8's, i've got a few of them.

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stevech wrote:

 

Kartman wrote:

An 8088 was a 16 bit cpu

 

I recall it being an 8 bit processor with some 16 bit instructions.

 

No, it was definitely a 16-bit CPU - it was used by 16-bit DOS/Windows, after all!

 

It was basically the same chip as an 8086, but with a reduced external address bus.

 

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I don't know about windows 1and 2, but win3 needed a 286 or better if memory serves me correctly.

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Nope we had windows 3 on our 8086 machines but 3.1 (may have been 3.01?) was then the first protect mode version. 

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Kartman wrote:
In the olden days there were some bit serial processors (1 bit) drum computers?

Quirky chips

January 29, 2012

http://www.embedded.com/electronics-blogs/break-points/4235428/2/Quirky-chips

...

Motorola's MC14500 was a one-bit CPU the company called an "Industrial Control Unit."

...

I can't determine when the chip came to market, but the handbook is dated 1977. Revision 3 of the datasheet was released in early 1994, so these odd devices did gain some traction.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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stevech wrote:
NXP did this to go after the automobile electronics market in a bigger way.

SoC vision for accident-free cars

March 05, 2015

http://www.embedded.com/electronics-news/4438816/SoC-vision-for-accident-free-cars

BARCELONA — Freescale Semiconductor has unveiled at the Mobile World Congress here an automotive vision system-on-chip, dubbed S32V, designed for what the company calls “an accident-free car.”

P.S. and O.T. :

Atmel Corporation

Home > Products > Microcontrollers > SMART ARM-based MCUs > SAM V MCUs

SAM V71 Xplained Ultra Evaluation Kit

http://www.atmel.com/tools/ATSAMV71-XULT.aspx

...

  • 2 MB SDRAM
  • 2 MB QSPI Flash
  • ...
  • ATA6561 CAN Transceiver
  • ...
  • Camera interface connector
  • ...
  • Coresight 20 connector for 4-bit ETM
  • ...
  • External power input (5-14V)
  • ...

 Atmel Corporation

Home > Products > Microcontrollers > SMART ARM-based MCUs > SAM V MCUs

SAM V71 / V70 / E70 / S70 Software Package

http://www.atmel.com/tools/samv71-samv70-same70-sams70-software-package.aspx

http://www.atmel.com/Images/samv71_softpack_release_note_.txt

Release Notes - SAMV71 Software Package
------------------------------------------
Release version: 1.0_rc4
Release date: 2015-2

...

2.1 GNU Software Package

...

GNU Tools for ARM Embedded Processors(later than V 4.8.4) has been used for SAMV71 Software Package for GNU development.
The official linker of GNU tools is https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded/+download

...

GDB can be launched using command line.

...

Several additional requirements are mandatory before building this target:
SAM-ICE gdbserver shall be started before.

...

3 Contents
-----------

This release of SAMV71 Software Package contains the following examples for CodeSourcery/GCC, IAR EWARM
and Keil μVision tool-chains:

...

Edits : Inject Atmel, corrected last URL.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Mar 8, 2015 - 01:20 AM
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If you're short of hc11a8's, i've got a few of them.

Never used the A8 but I still have a tube and half of  HC711E2, I sold some a couple of years back already programmed to a client, they may still come back and get more.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Kartman... you have written two messages (53 and 59) that seem to be refuting instruction length as an indicator of bitness. I dont recall ANY message by me in this whole thread that has mentioned instruction length at all. I DID ask why accumulator width doesnt have weight in determining the bitness of a cpu. It sort of defines the programmer's model. If 'load 32 bits into accumulator' is an assembly language instruction, and the accumulator is 32 bits, its a 32 bit cpu to me, whether its microcoded to do 4 8 bit accesses or 2 16 bit accesses. Its a price/performance tradeoff. Wider data paths->more silicon-> less chips per wafer. Price and performance are the primary selection criteria for which cpu to choose. Obviously.

 

 

Imagecraft compiler user

Last Edited: Sun. Mar 8, 2015 - 07:54 PM
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I dont recall ANY message in this whole thread that has mentioned instruction length at all.

CRS, Bob?  What about post #52, a response to one of >>you<< posts, which introduced instruction width?  (actually, outer_space made an indirect mention a bit earlier)

http://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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I haven't read all of this (holiday ;-) but to me the bit width of a CPU is the width of the accumulator/ALU. 

 

So rather remarkably I seem to be agreeing with Bob. surprise

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Smart guys think alike

Imagecraft compiler user

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How does that old truism go

 

 

Great minds think alike

 

and

 

...

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Chipworks

Patent and Technology Partner to the World’s Most Successful Companies

NXP/Freescale Merger - A Union of Equals

Contributed by Ray Angers

March 5, 2015

http://www.chipworks.com/en/technical-competitive-analysis/resources/blog/nxpfreescale-merger-a-union-of-equals/

...

To summarize, ...

...

Business analysts and the markets have signaled their approval. 

...

Technical analysts on the other hand are perhaps not as unanimous in their opinions, and not an unexpected reaction to those who are married to a given development platform. 

...

via a comment by cpldcpu in

Olimex on Wordpress

NXP bought Freescale for $11.8 Billion

06 Mar 2015

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/nxp-bought-freescale-for-11-8-billion

  • May one not wed an IDE for that implies love; like or dis-like of an IDE is more appropriate.
  • A concept of money exists in this thread; a key part of that article is the patent portfolio of each entity.

 

P.S.

Via the first URL (second JPEG titled "NXP Freescale Landscape of Patents") there's

02

for which I recall some of the early scenes in STNG "Where Silence Has Lease" for the outward appearance of the entity Nagilum.

May one not be similarly enveloped by patent (attornies, judges, justice) or harvested by entities (corporations, etc.).


Memory Alpha

Where Silence Has Lease (episode) - Memory Alpha, the Star Trek Wiki

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Where_Silence_Has_Lease_%28episode%29

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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accumulator width

Wasn't I reading recently how the Z80 has a 4bit ALU?   (Yeah: http://www.righto.com/2013/09/th... )  Yet it did 8bit math in the same number of clocks as an 8080, and people considered it an 8bit chip.

 

The 68000 was similarly confusing, with a nice array of 32 bit registers, a 16bit ALU, and 24 bit addresses.

 

bus width

 Some of the NXP ARM chips will execute code from serial (QSPI/etc) flash memory.  1bit CPU, anyone?

 

In general, I think you have to accept whatever the vendor says, and then make fun of them for whatever failings are obvious :-)

 

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westfw wrote:
Some of the NXP ARM chips will execute code from serial (QSPI/etc) flash memory.
Execute via QSPI is also a feature of Atmel Cortex-M7.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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westfw wrote:

1bit CPU, anyone?

Like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mot...

 

- S

 

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Wasn't I reading recently how the Z80 has a 4bit ALU?

Well I'll go to the foot our our stairs! surprise

 

I programmed Z80's for years in Asm and I would have sworn the ALU was 8 bits wide. As the article says:

Unlike Z-80 block diagrams published elsewhere, this block diagram is based on the actual silicon.

That includes the trusted Signetics opcode manual I always used and even the seminal "Rodnay Zaks" book. (page 49 onwards: http://www.z80.info/zip/zaks_boo... )

 

BTW that is one of the most interesting internet articles I've read in a long time - great link!

 

(Oh and thanks for making me google Zaks - I LOVED that book - learnt most of my Asm from it in the early 80's)

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Kartman wrote:
Codewarrior- yes it deserves its reputation.

Embedded Gurus

Freescale customer service

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015 by Nigel Jones

http://embeddedgurus.com/stack-overflow/2015/03/freescale-customer-service/

...

I then invoked CodeWarrior and got a wonderfully obtuse licensing error message that seemed to be saying I needed to purchase an additional component.

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Getting Codewarrior going is the least of your problems!

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Just received this, from Freescale:

 

Quote:

"Freescale + NXP"  .
Hello,
On March 2 we announced the pending merger of NXP Semiconductors N.V. and Freescale Semiconductor, Ltd. We are extremely excited about the possibility of combining two great portfolios of complementary products and technologies into one powerhouse semiconductor company.
First and foremost, you are absolutely our top priority -- now and always.
Our respective sales teams and distributors will continue to call on you and provide you great service and products. We are eager to be able to combine the families and portfolios of products, but for now, your contact will not change, nor will the products we offer. However, once the proposed merger has closed and we are allowed to combine resources (expected second half of 2015), we think you will find the solutions offered to you will be strong, complementary and exciting. If the transaction is successful, this upcoming merger will allow us to:
* Develop more complete solutions for you. 
* Shorten your design cycles by combining complimentary technologies. 
* Become a more valuable design partner for you. 

The two companies' portfolios overlap primarily in only one area, RF power products. In this case, NXP has decided to sell their RF power portfolio and keep the industry-leading Freescale RF portfolio. All other product families are expected to complement each other very nicely. For instance, the Freescale Kinetis MCU combination with NXP's leadership in connectivity and security is an easy and obvious fit. The same is true for NXP's FM tuners and Freescale's i.MX and Infotainment systems. Another is NXP's leadership in secure ID and Freescale's secure Digital Networking processors. We see these natural junctions in each product group and we look forward to exploring more with you.
Once the merger is complete, our plan is to keep the NXP Semiconductors name and operate as one company under the NXP brand. We are committed to our growth product lines and look forward to becoming the largest automotive semiconductor company on the planet and the fourth largest semiconductor supplier in the world. The focus of both companies has always been high-growth markets and focusing on our customers' needs and this will not change.
All total, we find the strength of combining NXP and Freescale to be exponential not incremental, and we look forward to sharing these benefits with you.
The Form F-4 has been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Once the proxy statement/prospectus is declared effective by the SEC, we will call the shareholder vote to approve the merger between NXP and Freescale. We expect to close the merger in 2H15.
We will continue to communicate as often as we can. In the meantime, if you have any questions or need information, please do not hesitate to reach out to us or your sales representative or FAE. Serving our customers is our first and most important priority and we want to ensure your happiness and success.
Best regards,
..

"Gregg Lowe"              
Gregg Lowe             
President and CEO             
Freescale Semiconductor             

"Brandon Tolany"              
Brandon Tolany             
Senior Vice President             
Chief Sales and Marketing Officer             
Freescale Semiconductor             

..

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward Looking Statements 
This document includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the securities laws. The words "may," "could," "should," "estimate," "project," "forecast," intend," "expect," "anticipate," "believe," "target," "plan," "providing guidance" and similar expressions are intended to identify information that is not historical in nature. 
This document contains forward-looking statements relating to the proposed transaction between the Company and NXP pursuant to a merger. All statements, other than historical facts, including statements regarding the expected timing of the closing of the transaction; the ability of the parties to complete the transaction considering the various closing conditions; the expected benefits of the transaction such as improved operations, enhanced revenues and cash flow, growth potential, market profile and financial strength; the competitive ability and position of NXP following completion of the proposed transaction; and any assumptions underlying any of the foregoing, are forward-looking statements. Such statements are based upon current plans, estimates and expectations that are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions. The inclusion of such statements should not be regarded as a representation that such plans, estimates or expectations will be achieved. You should not place 
undue reliance on such statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from such plans, estimates or expectations include, among others, that (1) one or more closing conditions to the transaction, including certain regulatory approvals, may not be satisfied or waived, on a timely basis or otherwise, including that a governmental entity may prohibit, delay or refuse to grant approval for the consummation of the transaction, may require conditions, limitations or restrictions in connection with such approvals or that the required approval by the shareholders of each of the Company and NXP may not be obtained; (2) there may be a material adverse change of the Company or the business of the Company may suffer as a result of uncertainty surrounding the transaction; (3) the transaction may involve unexpected costs, liabilities or delays; (4) legal proceedings may be initiated related to the transaction; (5) there may be difficulties and delays in 
achieving synergies and cost savings; and (6) other risk factors as detailed from time to time in the Company's and NXP's reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), including the preliminary proxy statement/prospectus filed with the SEC by NXP on April 2, 2015 and the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, which are available on the SEC's Website ( www.sec.gov <http://app.contact.freescale.com/e/er?elq_mid=3808&elq_cid=496340&s=1764&lid=8923&elq=6153bd41dba84f21a4d339119752b059&elqaid=3808&elqat=1&elqTrackId=8834212355814ae8825d990394ddb061>). There can be no assurance that the merger will be completed, or if it is completed, that it will close within the anticipated time period or that the expected benefits of the merger will be realized. 
Neither the Company nor NXP undertakes any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any of these forward-looking statements. 
Additional Information and Where to Find It 
On April 2, 2015, NXP filed with the SEC a Registration Statement on Form F-4 which includes a preliminary proxy statement of the Company and a preliminary prospectus of NXP. The Registration Statement has not been declared effective by the SEC and the definitive proxy statement/prospectus is not currently available. Following the Registration Statement having been declared effective by the SEC, NXP and the Company will deliver the definitive proxy statement and prospectus, respectively, to their shareholders. INVESTORS ARE URGED TO READ THE PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS/PROXY STATEMENT, AND THE DEFINITIVE PROSPECTUS/PROXY STATEMENT WHEN IT BECOMES AVAILABLE, BECAUSE THEY CONTAIN OR WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. Investors may obtain the preliminary prospectus/proxy statement, as well as other filings containing information about the Company and NXP, free of charge, from the SEC's Website (www.sec.gov 
<http://app.contact.freescale.com/e/er?elq_mid=3808&elq_cid=496340&s=1764&lid=8923&elq=6153bd41dba84f21a4d339119752b059&elqaid=3808&elqat=1&elqTrackId=b3069348b4654cd881d17ec0041b87b5>).Investors may also obtain the Company's SEC filings in connection with the transaction, free of charge, from the Company's Web site (www.investors.freescale.com <http://app.contact.freescale.com/e/er?elq_mid=3808&elq_cid=496340&s=1764&lid=8924&elq=6153bd41dba84f21a4d339119752b059&elqaid=3808&elqat=1&elqTrackId=6ff993f3423148138e8b3dbc79adcac8>)
 under the link "Investors Relations" and then under the tab "SEC Filings," or by directing a request to Freescale Semiconductor, Ltd., 6501 William Cannon Drive West, MD OE62, Austin, Texas 78735, Attention: Secretary.Investors may also obtain NXP's SEC filings in connection with the transaction, free of charge, on NXP's Investor Relations internet website at http://www.nxp.com/investor<http://app.contact.freescale.com/e/er?elq_mid=3808&elq_cid=496340&s=1764&lid=8842&elq=6153bd41dba84f21a4d339119752b059&elqaid=3808&elqat=1&elqTrackId=58da557b997f4e2fbf3769fbb732dd9f> or by contacting NXP's Investor Relations Contact by phone at 1-408-518-5411. 
Participants in the Merger Solicitation 
The respective directors, executive officers and employees of the Company and NXP and other persons may be deemed to be participants in the solicitation of proxies in respect of the transaction. Information regarding the Company's directors and executive officers and a description of their interests in the acquisition is set forth in the preliminary proxy statement/prospectus filed with the SEC by NXP on April 2, 2015, and additional information regarding the Company's directors and executive officers is set forth in its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, which was filed with the SEC on February 6, 2015, and its proxy statement for its 2015 annual meeting of shareholders, which was filed with the SEC on March 16, 2015. Information regarding the directors and executive officers of NXP is set forth in its Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2014, which was filed with the SEC on March 6, 2015. These documents can be obtained free of 
charge from the sources indicated above. This communication shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any securities, nor shall there be any sale of securities in any jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such jurisdiction. No offer of securities shall be made except by means of a prospectus meeting the requirements of Section 10 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. 

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Interesting that there is far more "cautionary" words than anything else...

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:

Interesting that there is far more "cautionary" words than anything else...

 

Standard boiler-plate in the US for publicly-traded companies, as any official statement like this may affect stock price(s).

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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["The two companies' portfolios overlap primarily in only one area, RF power products. In this case, NXP has decided to sell their RF power portfolio and keep the industry-leading Freescale RF portfolio. All other product families are expected to complement each other very nicely. For instance, the Freescale Kinetis MCU combination with NXP's leadership in connectivity and security is an easy and obvious fit.'"]

 

Nice try - did they really figure by not using the word MCU twice, they could fool some customers ?!

There is actually a shipload of overlap in ARM Microcontrollers, which has to worry designers, will their choice be NRND quickly ?

 

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Yes Lee, I am aware of the reasons for the boiler-plate addon. Thanks.

 

"Shipload"... maybe just in Australia, but we spell it differently devil

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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History says the buyer (Freescale) gets to cull and kill.

Bye-bye LPCs.

 

Hello NXP Kenits - (an odd word. Sounds like a medical condition).

 

 

 

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stevech wrote:
the buyer (Freescale)

Really?

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stevech wrote:
Kenits - (an odd word

The word you're looking for is Kinetis.

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And now Qualcomm wants to buy the lot:

 

http://www.electronicproducts.co...

 

Qualcomm_NXP

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Olimex on Wordpress

Qualcomm is buying NXP

30 Sep 2016

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2016/09/30/qualcomm-is-buying-nxp/

...

One is for sure imx.X is not going to be developed further as Qualcomm has plenty of competing products.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Update on the cross ref - deal still not closed, and now Broadcom appearing on the scene: http://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

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