Alternative non-Atmel non-homebrew uPDI Programmer

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I have one of these...

 

 

 

...and I've just been playing with a Beta version of the UP software which the guys at Asix have added uPDI support to.

 

It's nice to have something that doesn't rely on Atmel tools/software.

'This forum helps those who help themselves.'

 

pragmatic  adjective dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical consideration.

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You mean this: https://www.asix.net/prg_forte.htm ?

 

EDIT

 

Which appears to be just a programmer; no debug capability - yes?

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 31, 2017 - 06:04 PM
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awneil wrote:

You mean this: https://www.asix.net/prg_forte.htm ?

 

EDIT

 

Which appears to be just a programmer; no debug capability - yes?

 

That's the one and yes it's just a programmer (but one which do just about every uC out there).

'This forum helps those who help themselves.'

 

pragmatic  adjective dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical consideration.

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For $230 dollar it better be a nice programmer!!!.....that's a lot of dough, use a parallel port and 3 resistors. angel

 

It's nice to have something that doesn't rely on Atmel tools/software.

Why do you say that? 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.

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avrcandies wrote:

It's nice to have something that doesn't rely on Atmel tools/software.

Why do you say that? 

Good question: given that AVR is proprietary & single source - you're pretty reliant on Atmel anyhow ...

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awneil wrote:

avrcandies wrote:

It's nice to have something that doesn't rely on Atmel tools/software.

Why do you say that? 

Good question: given that AVR is proprietary & single source - you're pretty reliant on Atmel anyhow ...

 

A good question deserves a good answer...

 

I have spent far too long fighting the tools, both soft and hard. I earn a significant part of my living by sitting here designing embedded 'stuff' and every day I spend trying to get USB drivers to play nicely with other USB drivers is a day wasted. I do not need multi-gigabyte toolchain installations; I do not need bloated libraries; I do not need programmers that when installed stop other things which were working from working. I've been there and done that. That's why I'm happy to spend money on good tools that just work.

 

I use a commercial compiler and pay the annual upgrade fee to stay up to date. For that I get proper responsive support when things don't work, or when I need a new feature in the compiler. The current version of CVAVR has at least two features in it that are there because I asked for them. I use commercial hardware tools for the same reason. I had and used the Forte for other chips, it already did the current Atmel protocols and the other week I emailed ASIX to ask if they had any plans around the 'x1x' series. They said it was something they were considering and here I am a week later trying out a beta version.

 

I very rarely use software ICE. Most of the stuff I do is real-time hardware stuff. Debugging things like stepper motor controllers just doesn't work if you stop the processor. For me, a decent 'scope and logic analyser are much more useful.

 

It's true that the chips are single source, however, it's also true that if a chip was ever discontinued it'd be fairly painless to move to a different chip as I design things from the ground up. My favourite design tools are paper and pencil. Code comes much later.

'This forum helps those who help themselves.'

 

pragmatic  adjective dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical consideration.

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
My favourite design tools are paper and pencil. Code comes much later.
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