CAN using Xmega

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hii

 

i am new to atmel boards i wants to know can be able to make code using CAN protocol (programmming of CAN) ATxmega256A3U ic in Xmega-A3BU xplained board

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With Warm Regards
Devang Gupta
SW Embedded Engineer
Skype id Devang.gupta

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 19, 2017 - 08:41 AM
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I have split your hijack into a separate thread.

 

Moderator.

 

BTW the Atmel Product Selector seems to suggest there are no Xmega devices with CAN support.

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Devang Gupta wrote:
i am new to atmel boards

Do you have experience with other boards?

 

There is nothing special or magic about Atmel boards:  they have Schematics and BOMs and User Manuals just like any other boards - you study those for details of what is available on the board.

 

i wants to know can be able to make code using CAN protocol (programmming of CAN) ATxmega256A3U ic in Xmega-A3BU xplained board

The documentation is here: http://www.atmel.com/tools/xmega-a3buxplained.aspx - what further do you need?

 

As already noted, that board has no specific CAN hardware - so you would have to add that externally.

 

That would be just the same as using any other board & processor without specific CAN hardware.

 

But, if CAN is a specific requirements of your project, why would you not choose stuff that comes ready-equipped for CAN ??

 

frown

 

EDIT

 

typo

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 19, 2017 - 08:18 AM
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@clawson said:

BTW the Atmel Product Selector seems to suggest there are no Xmega devices with CAN support.

Not even the ATxmega64D3-Automotive, which is a little unusual.  I've always thought CAN was a requirement in the automotive arena. 

Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Atmel Studio 7.0 on Windows 10

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

 

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I guess "automotive" in that case just means qualified for the "automotive" temperature range?

 

There are plenty of things in automotive that don't actually need to talk to a CAN bus

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Really? My day job is automotive and about the only reason any electronics in the car are not somehow connected to CAN is simply because their comms interface is on a more modern Ethernet/Flexray interface.
.
Rather ironically what I spent my afternoon doing was pushing some CAN decode software into a new git repo.

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 19, 2017 - 05:48 PM
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clawson wrote:
Really? My day job is automotive and about the only reason any electronics in the car are not somehow connected to CAN is simply because their comms interface is on a more modern Ethernet/Flexray interface.

That's not so obvious. I'm a software engineer in an automotive company and although most of my colleagues works on devices with CAN and also I do it sometimes, currentlty I'm working on projects without CAN or any other interface like Ethernet or Flexray.