What does Atmel now Microchip have for 32 bit?

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I've been messing around with ST ARM's using Atollic TrueStudio and honestly I greatly prefer AS7.  How does what Atmel/Microchip offers compare to ST ARM's?  Are the UC3 what they did before the "Smart ARM"?  Does AS7 support "Smart ARM"?

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Atmel's SAM series predates AVR32. SAM7 was available in the early 2000's. AS7 supports the modern SAM series.

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alank2 wrote:
I've been messing around with ST ARM's using Atollic TrueStudio and honestly I greatly prefer AS7.
Considered Somnium's IDE?

http://www.mouser.com/new/somnium-technologies/somnium-drt-ide/

 

An alternative to Atmel Studio 7 is VisualGDB on Visual Studio :

https://visualgdb.com/

 

Edit : VisualGDB

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Sep 16, 2017 - 04:32 AM
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Microchip now has a broad range of 32bit microcontrollers:  UC3 (AVR32), ARM (assorted SAM chips:  CM0, CM3, CM4, CM7, ARM7) (plus "microprocessors"), and MIPS (PIC32) in various forms (that I'm less familiar with.)  It's actually pretty impressive.

 

(Hmm.  The current web pages list AVR32, SAM3, and SAM7 as "legacy products")

 

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alank2 wrote:
How does what Atmel/Microchip offers compare to ST ARM's?
One niche is large memory MCU for operator interface by PIC32MZ DA.

http://www.microchip.com/design-centers/32-bit/architecture/pic32mz-da-family

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Kartman wrote:
Atmel's SAM series predates AVR32. SAM7 was available in the early 2000's. AS7 supports the modern SAM series.

SAM7 was ARM7.

 

ISTR there was also a SAM9 - which wsa ARM9.

 

I think these were before they came up with "Smart ARM" as the meaning for SAM - I think that is a back-formation.

 

The "modern SAM" are all Cortex based.

 

westfw wrote:
(Hmm.  The current web pages list AVR32, SAM3, and SAM7 as "legacy products")

 

Well, AVR32 (and SAM7) we knew about .

 

I think SAM3 was Atmel's first Cortex? So not so surprising if it's now "legacy" ...

 

gchapman wrote:
An alternative to Atmel Studio 7 is VisualGDB on Visual Studio :

Or a generic GNU-ARM-Eclipse setup with GDB?

 

https://gnu-mcu-eclipse.github.io/

 

(now seems to be calling itself "GNU-MCU-Eclipse" - and including RISC-V support)

 

EDIT

 

typo

Last Edited: Sat. Sep 16, 2017 - 09:41 AM
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An alternative to Atmel Studio 7 is VisualGDB on Visual Studio :

A zero price alternative is the Visual Studio extension Visual C++ for IoT but it doesn't appear to be up-to-date.

Likely better is the Visual Studio Code extension Native Debug.

 

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=MarcGoodner-MSFT.VisualCforIoTDevelopment

Visual Studio Code > Debuggers > Native Debug

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=webfreak.debug

GDB, LLDB & Mago-MI Debugger support for VSCode

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller