Mini UV exposure box home made

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Ultraviolet exposing unit in many industries like Tshirt printing, PCB manufacturing etc. For electronics this UV exposure units are mandatory for developing films and photo etching. For learning if we need this UV exposure units these are bit costly to afford.

 

I faced this problem when i started to develop photo films for my own PCB, We can use sun light for this, but constant light source is need for good quality outputs. So i came up with this idea to make my own mini UV exposing unit.

 

Let me tell you how to do it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

connect UV LEDs in dotted PCB board like shown above. i have connected ten ten LEDs in parallels and interconnected them as serial. so energy will distributed equally and you will get equal amount of exposure all over.

 

You can buy UV LEDs from various online electronic stores. i bought it from electroncomponents.com

 

 

 

Once you finished with interconnecting LEDs, place the board in unused box like shown in above picture, let the positive and negative wire hang outside to connect power source.

 

you can use variable power supply to adjust exposure level.

 

I used a small size photo frame to frame the film i want to expose. and cover it with my exposure box to make the task simple.

 

 

Caution: Use Eye Protection while working on UV lights.

 

 

 

Hope you enjoyed this article, if you like this kindly share it with your friends.

 

 

 

 

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Last Edited: Fri. Sep 8, 2017 - 05:02 PM
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I'll move this to General Electronics
Jim

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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His 3 previous posts have been deleted. Is he just a spammer?

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His other posts are still there....

 

I'll let it be for now. Thanks.

 

JIm

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Doh, forgot to click comments and replies.

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I don't see any current limiting resistors.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:

I don't see any current limiting resistors.


I would guess that the cumulative forward voltage drops of each led equals the value of Vsupply so you might not need them?

There are 9 leds in each 'string'. Based on the specs of the UV led I found on the website the OP called out the Vf is between 3.5 and 4.5v. Assume Vf of 3.5 that's 31.5vdc. At Vf of 4.0 that's 36vdc and you can get power supplies in that output voltage.

I also saw constant current led drivers on the site which the OP could be using as well

Jim

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Jim, each of those "strings" looks to me to be 10 leds in parallel (which he also states) and those red/yellow wires also appear to be in parallel.... unless I am going blind. Could you check again for me?

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:
nless I am going blind.

You're not....I am.frown

 

YUP they are indeed in parallel.  OK, I'll grasp at a straw here.  The LED I pulled from the website he calls out:

 

http://www.electroncomponents.co...

 

On the high side says Vf = 4.5v  COuld a +5vdc Power supply be used...for a short time?  Or a hefty switcher with an output Vadj that can knock the supply to +4.5vdc?

 

On the flip side a hefty 3.3v switcher with a Vadj that can raise the supply to 3.5 - 4vdc?

 

YOu are correct though, based on just the pictures limiting resistors are needed unless the OP is using one of the two "straws" I just mentioned.

 

Maybe the OP can answer this burning question for us tomorrow/today.

 

Jim

If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue! - Kartman

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user