Using RN4020 with ATMEGA16A

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Having used the Microchip RN42 BT 2.1 module for some time, I thought it would be simple to migrate to Low Energy 4.1 using the Microchip RN4020. Not so!

Found out that I know nothing and need a good steer from learned forum members.

 

I've got a BLE2 click board from Mikroelektronika running on an Easy AVRv7 board with an ATMEGA16 mounted so the test environment is sorted and I can monitor

the traffic to the UART port which is OK.

 

My problem is understanding how to get a BLE scanner to communicate with the RN4020.

 

Any advice on a good reference book on Low Energy BT would be a great start. 

 

Also any advice on how to tackle talking to a portable device like a scanner would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Last Edited: Mon. Aug 21, 2017 - 10:05 PM
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jalbinson wrote:
My problem is understanding how to get a BLE scanner to communicate with the RN4020

Which has nothing at all to do with AVR.

 

Such experimentation is usually better done with a terminal...

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What's wrong with the Microchip's or Mikroelektronika website to ask question for that stuff? Moved to general electronics.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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From the horse's mouth (ie, the Bluetooth SIG):

Bluetooth LE: Point-to-Point

Bluetooth® Low Energy (LE) enables short-burst wireless connections and uses multiple network topologies, including point-to-point (P2P) topology for one-to-one (1:1) device communications. Bluetooth LE P2P optimizes data transfers and is ideal for connected device products, such as fitness trackers and health monitors.

 

https://www.bluetooth.com/what-is-bluetooth-technology/how-it-works/le-p2p

 

Bluetooth LE: Broadcast

Bluetooth® Low Energy (LE) enables short-burst wireless connections and uses multiple network topologies, including a broadcast topology for one-to-many (1:m) device communications. Bluetooth LE broadcast topology supports localized information sharing and is well suited for beacon solutions, such point-of-interest (PoI) information and item and way-finding services.

Sample markets

 

https://www.bluetooth.com/what-is-bluetooth-technology/how-it-works/le-broadcast

 

And, new in BT 5:

 

Bluetooth LE: mesh

Bluetooth® Low Energy (LE) enables short-burst wireless connections and supports multiple network topologies, including a mesh topology for establishing many-to-many (m:m) device communications.

Bluetooth mesh is optimized for creating large-scale device networks and is ideally suited for building automation, sensor network and asset tracking solutions.

 

https://www.bluetooth.com/what-is-bluetooth-technology/how-it-works/le-mesh

 

 

 

 

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LE: Point-to-Point   LE: Broadcast  LE: mesh

LE Pepé Le Pew....

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly